Trinity Due for Demolition in 2005

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    • #706854
      Anonymous
      Participant

      http://www.p45rateit.net/general/index.php?PHPSESSID=75dfeaa4fa376c3e93b363011fe6052b&show=view&sr=81&pp=1&cp=82&s=m

      Quote “Oringinally built as the set for the film Educating Rita. Due for demolition in 2005.”

      Is Trinity past it?

      Is the site too constrained?

    • #741022
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Diaspora, I am confused by the circular referencing of the online posts here. ie: your post brought me to your original source only for the original source to bring me straight back here!

      Can you also explain what your issue with Trinity is?

      Thanks

      Phil

    • #741023
      MB OMaoileoin
      Participant

      Trinity College is of course Dublin University’s only college. Why weren’t more colleges built as happened over the centuries at Oxford and Cambridge Universities? In any case were there ever any plans to expand Dublin University in this way?

    • #741024
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Originally posted by phil
      Diaspora, I am confused by the circular referencing of the online posts here. ie: your post brought me to your original source only for the original source to bring me straight back here!

      Well it just seemed like a quote that would provoke more reaction on this site than the that. I referenced this post so that anyone who was interested in TCD might look at this.

      The idea of this thread wasn’t really serious, and I don’t have any issues with trinity.

      But like many who have observed it’s development I am getting a little concerned about the constant additions.

      The quality of the amenity is going down a little as each additional building takes away a little more open space.

      Most are familiar with the historic section and the newer arts block and library. But it is to the back and Pearse St side that I am concerned about.

      It may be time fore TCD to acquire a site off the campus and transfer a few faculties before the entire site ends up built upon. :rolleyes:

    • #741025
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Originally posted by Diaspora
      It may be time fore TCD to acquire a site off the campus and transfer a few faculties before the entire site ends up built upon.

      I’m sure the British Embassy could give them some space. After all, TCD still acts like it part of the Empire.

    • #741026
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Ah, now I am with you Diaspora!
      I would be very suprised if anymore of the various squares within the campus were built upon. The only area which might get targeted could be the liear car park which runs along Naussau Street/South Leinster Street (Unlikely though). Are you referring to the way it presents a blank face on the Pearse Street side and is in some ways responsible for the fact that this area of Pearse Street is quite dead?!

      It seems as though it is starting to buy up a few properties off campus: for example the department of Sociology and the Politics department is in that Office Building on the corner of Fosters Place and College Green, whilst the old Gas Building on D’Olier Street is presently being converted into its Nursing School.

    • #741027
      garethace
      Participant

      It isn’t just Trinity, the whole education thing here in Ireland is still carrying a huge amount of baggage and excess weight on all fronts.

      Anyone who would try to put forward any aspect of Irish higher level education as a perfect solution, would be very foolish.

      By criticising Trinity in isolation, are we somehow trying to imply that other institutions are without fault altogether?

      Thread here:

      https://archiseek.com/content/showthread.php?threadid=2761

      Dealing with an idea, bit daft, but still an idea to ‘write a brief’ for a new improved faculty to do with the built environment.

    • #741028
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Originally posted by garethace
      It
      By criticising Trinity in isolation, are we somehow trying to imply that other institutions are without fault altogether?
      [

      Being honest Brian if Kevin St, most of Aungier St and Bolton St, Cathal Brugha St and Mounjoy Square minus the facade got nuked it would be no great loss. (As Buildings)
      No-one really believes that Grange G will ever happen I think. It is little more than Goldsmiths pipedream, and as lengths of wavin they don’t get much bigger.

      Trinity is also right in the centre of the City. The way it has operated its holdings onto Pearse St have been nothing short of a disgrace.

      That entire end of Pearse St is virtually dead to pedestrians and is in marked contrast to the way it was before they started their acquisition strategy. 😡

    • #741029
      garethace
      Participant

      You don’t need to look at Trinity even to see disgrace of pedestrian usage/sympathetic design.

      I remember doing a site over beside that old Casey building Georgian building at the end of Essex Street. The site beside the old church which is the Viking centre now. That street is absolutely dead, that area has nothing to draw people to it, and Dublin cco have insisted on using the pedestrian route through their building now as a place to put skips and park cars!

      That Essex Street route, coming through Wood Quay civic offices continues right over to Pearse street as you have described has no activity either. That whole axis is terrible in comparison to the south/north axis from the Green to Parnell Square. It is amazing what cardinal points can mean isn’t it? I mean, in peoples’ mental perception of their environment, in terms of Kevin Lynch and his book called ‘Image of a City’.

      I think people in Dublin see Trinity college as a useful way to define where ‘South of the river ends and the North really begins’. Unfortunately Wood Quay seems to have done just about the same thing, as has Guinnesses brewery too.

      I mean Temple Bar is really the only only place along the whole length of the river currently where North and South seem to be joined somewhat – and even there they made a mess of things with the footbridge!

      https://archiseek.com/content/showthread.php?s=&postid=21596#post21596

      I love the way in which Ringsend and the area around the point are connected in some small way by the bridge down there. I welcome the arrival of a new bridge though, between west link and buck bridge.

    • #741030
      notjim
      Participant

      as a acedemic research scientist let me comment that the city centre location and prestegious buildings is a huge asset to trinity. in a research career, one important thing is status, you try and move up, and status is linked partly to prestegious buildings and city centre locations. this help alot when recruiting researchers from abroad and any move from the current site would be stupid. tcd has a huge advantage over ucd when it comes to international perception and hiring, whatever about the domestic situation.

      the way pearse street has been treated is terrible, also the lincoln corner. the college is trying to improve, it promises to renovate the pearse street fronts at a rate of two a year, it is reopening the lincoln inn and is going to build student accomadation between luas hall and the street, though there is no money for much at the moment. there are plans to build behind the pearse street buildings, but not to encroach on the existing green space. there are no plans to build between nassau street and the park, nor is it likely any development that intruded on the view from nassau street would ever be allowed.

      as for the colleges ability to expand beyond the island site, there is still the an post site behind pearse station, the innovation centre on pearse street where the craft tower is, the new space on foster place and the move to the bord gais building.

    • #741031
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Originally posted by notjim

      the way pearse street has been treated is terrible, also the lincoln corner. the college is trying to improve, it promises to renovate the pearse street fronts at a rate of two a year,

      Trinity has submitted a planning application to demolish most of the college’s buildings on Pearse St including the Listed Nuzum Bros shop fronts. To be replaced by a large modern block that would be heavily glazed.

      Obviously they are saying one thing and doing another in the West Chapel these days. 😡

    • #741032
      notjim
      Participant

      i am shocked if that’s true, i thought retention of the pearse street facades was part of the strategic plan. when was the application submitted?

    • #741033
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Originally posted by notjim
      i am shocked if that’s true, i thought retention of the pearse street facades was part of the strategic plan. when was the application submitted?

      It was submitted before Christmas according to Devin who was not pleased at all.

      The deal was that a new structure would be built and in return new access from Pearse St to the main campus would be provided.

    • #741034
      ro_G
      Participant

      would hate to see Nuzum Bros shopfront go.

    • #741035
      blue
      Participant

      Correct me if I’m wrong but hasn’t Trinity acquired some buildings on Dame St next to Foster Place. They’re going to knock them into each other to create a larger space and construction is on going at the moment.

      The plan is to rent out the retail units and have lecture rooms etc on the upper floors. Think Little Ceasers is moving in!

    • #741036
      notjim
      Participant

      what you said is true blue, but with administration office rather than lecture theatres.

      would hate to see nuzum bros go, also the old bicycle factory, and indeed the terrace as a whole. there is easily a better way to reintroduce access from pearse street and to build behind these buildings.

    • #741037
      Rory W
      Participant

      luas hall

      It’s Luce hall – although it does remind me of a tram shed

    • #741038
      garethace
      Participant

      On campus space and architecture.

      Has anyone ever visited campuses on the continent, where buildings tend to get as large as this:

      http://www.cgarchitect.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=get_topic;f=4;t=000497

      This image is very rough I know:

      http://www.cgarchitect.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=next_topic;f=5;t=000435;go=newer

      But captures more or less the scale of buildings/spaces prevalent in many campuses around the globe.

      Then in campuses you get these odd kinds of stadia and things thrown into the mix, like in UCD, Trinity or UL where sports feature as part of the ‘scene’.

      http://www.cgarchitect.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=next_topic;f=5;t=000452;go=newer

      Making for a very interesting juxtaposition of scales and structures of various periods, designers and styles. I often laugh when someone describes a certain ‘architect’ being the master planner of a campus.

      But on the point about Trinity.

      I have noticed in UCD the attempt to do this kind of ‘undercroft’ treatment like in many foot ball stadia, and also the Leopardstown Race Course, where public activities etc happen at different levels to other functions.

      http://www.cgarchitect.com/cgi-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=next_topic;f=4;t=000514;go=older

    • #741039
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Garethace, have you had a look at the two new buildings in UCD? I personally think that the new Virus Reference lab is a gem! (the big black building which is located close to the front entrance)

      Thanks

      Phil

    • #741040
      garethace
      Participant

      Well to be perfectly honest with you I am more into how the external spaces are treated in university planning/architecture. Because that is where the students spend a larger portion of their time. Louis Kahn believed that these corridors and so forth, would be like class rooms in themselves where students would learn from no teachers – but from each other – rather than long narrow sneak passages as he called them – normally what is called for in educational budgets.

      Notice that nice new space created in front of the new MOLA student centre building – grey brick one, horizontal building. That new space works well I think and ties in the old existing sports hall, pub or whatever, which was quite isolated before now.

      MOLA have done a nice little DIT student residence building up at Broadstone, which should also be nice. I have seen the new buildings you are describing, the new Lab is indeed a good effort and commands the space around it nicely – but as you are possibly familiar with in Trinity college campus, new developments always seem to be a mixed bag – with some excellent examples like Arts block in Trinity and some trully awful attempts – owing to lack of budget etc, etc.

      It is as if they break the bank on one development, and then build a couple of cheap-o’s following that one great building.

      I am not really a big fan of the O’Reilly hall in UCD – not because of the building itself as such, but rather the lack of an attempt to deal with and create exterior spaces, like the new student centre does. The main boulevard type of space in DCU isn’t at all bad either I don’t think. To be honest, I find the UL campus a bit all over the place and lacks any clearly defined grand central space or avenue. Despite all kinds of buildings and investments down through the years, and attempts at making it better. Plus the campus at Plassey doesn’t seem to suffer from any problems of vandalism or other difficulties like Trinity college would be exposed to.

      What UL campus definitely lacked is a good architect with a vision.

      Similarly with the former RTC’s, Institutes of Technology around the country. But I think that main ‘mall’ type space in DCU is alright. In Bolton Street, there was no opportunity to make a good external space, so they opted instead for a grand atrium idea, which is worth visiting. In Angier Street there is a grand central courtyard, which isn’t even used, and very little other gesture towards public open space. In Kevin Street, nearby, they have tied together a mess of buildings quite favorably with a nice new hard landscaped courtyard now. Worth taking a look. You should try the little entrance on the side street, which is the one most used by the students now I think. Making the front entrance a bit underused now I think.

      I have not been to Cathal Brugha Street in ages now, but I wouldn’t expect much out of it really. MOLA seem to have a fine portfolio of educational projects at this stage, have a look here:

      http://www.murrayolaoire.com/education/projects/projectsindex2.html

      No attempt there is made to sell the UCD student centre project though – but other projects are a little bit better featured.

    • #741041
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Originally posted by garethace
      In Bolton Street, there was no opportunity to make a good external space, so they opted instead for a grand atrium idea, which is worth visiting.

      Any chance of a photo of the new structure errected for smokers. Its a Gem 😀

    • #741042
      garethace
      Participant

      Really?

    • #741043
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Iron painted blue although the finish is aging a little badly, heavily glazed (with perspex)

      The seats are of robust teak construction inthe minimalist style include a good layer of green gungy moss.

      It comfortably accomodates 4.

      POA

      Seriously Bolton St that apart is very good considering it was built in 1988. The internal area works very well when the Carrolls comedy club is in. The external courtyard is thronged during the exam season. The numbers of punters hanging around are usually a good indicator of Quality.

      But can someone please throw the bus shelter in a skip its an insult to a college with an Architecture faculty.

    • #741044
      garethace
      Participant

      If they could move that basement stuff out of Bolton Street altogether, you could establish a whole new kind of ‘level’ of spaces and uses. I.e. the Concrete testers and the mechanics – into a totally new facility. You could bring those existing lightwells into the picture – which at the moment just sit there with dead pigeons lying in the middle of them.

      I think pigeon shit is a real problem in dank, cold, mossy spaces like that. Dunno how one could design around it. It just says really, that light is an essential ingredient of any architecture. The architecture department is on the highest floor, so it tends to ‘lift itself’ somewhat out of the spooky, pigeon inhabited underworld below.

      I mean even the Georgian terrace, was a very dense form of development too, but at least it made one great shaft of space, as the street, to allow ventilation, views and light. Bolton Street is some kind of ‘knotted’ up figure of eight Georgian terrace gone badly wrong.

      I respect the background of Bolton Street though as a place for technological, engineering etc, etc, etc. Like the trades school thing across the road and all. The number of people down through the years who have passed through Bolton Street, Rathmines, Cathal Brugha Street, Mountjoy Square, Angier Street…………….. stands on its own merit.

      But DIT doesn’t really have a home as such. You have Bolton Street and the trade school, you have Kevin Street and Angier st. as sort of ‘hubs’ of activity in various parts of the city. With some ‘sporadic skermishes’ occuring at places like Mountjoy and Rathmines.

      I suppose this is really the advantage of ‘having a home’ though, something like an actual campus. Because you can invest in good once off building projects at least every decade, and be reasonably assured that it all adds up to some improvement of existing facilities, spaces, environment etc. With all due respect to University facilities, I think any of the investment in education pays itself back well.

      But it is always a good thing to see developments all happen on one campus, just so as to monitor what is being spent and where it is being spent.

      Angier Street have a new Library facility, which is very, very, very underused, as a main college facility. It is offered to anyone witha student card, for a cost of €1 per day ticket, which is wonderful – but that fact is not well advertised either. In Trinity, in the libraries, the number of bums on seats at all points during the day is just staggering by comparison.

      Limerick campus perhaps doesn’t ‘come together’ very well, where the lack of a central grand vision really tells. While having all this US money to build new big huge buildings for labs etc worked against it a bit. That new Olympic Swimming pool they have is interesting, because noone can really use it – it is just like a huge high security prison facility like in the movie ‘Face Off’.

      It towers over everything around it, including a village made of semi-d’s which they referred to as the on-campus student ‘accomodation’ up til quite recently.

      It might be noted too, that O’D & T started out years ago with Jim Stirling, and that their Virus building on UCD campus, in a way perhaps does pay some sort of homage to their first teacher and experience as architects. Where are those lab buildings, which Stirling did in England again?

      In general though, I think that the campus out in Belfield is starting to come together bit by bit and hopefully will continue to improve in the right ways.

    • #741045
      garethace
      Participant

      Guess what was an issue as part of the Trinity SU president election? 🙂

      Right, you have guessed it.

      The provision of a shuttle bus service from new Trinity student residences in Dartry into the college campus in town.

      Ah yes, I will scribble down more when I get around to it – worth seeing what SU in Trinity these days actually considers ‘issues’ – very applicable to design and architecture a large number of them.

    • #741046
      MB OMaoileoin
      Participant

      In terms of foreign universities, Oxford and Cambridge both stand out to me for their architecture (old and new) and their collegiate (as opposed to federal or unified) structure. Why does TCD have to keep expanding? Instead, why doesn’t Dublin University just build a new college (or colleges) on another site? I know there was talk in the 1960’s of TCD and UCD forming part of a new university but I think it was more along federal lines.

    • #741047
      garethace
      Participant

      I think as client universities generally go cap in hand to the government and ask for dough.

      I think generally universities have to be supported, they have to ask for money.

      I think it is therefore best probably to give them a good spread of land, with a view to filling it up with buildings in say, another 30-40 years.

      I mean, places like Crumlin were considered ‘out in the sticks’ years ago, but now are considered central. I am sure UCD ‘was out in the sticks’ not so long ago – but now you have all kinds of industry and offices moving into the Clonskeagh area, high density on Milltown Road and Dartry, Dundrum is getting more built up….. things change, and what was once all leafy residential suburban has now become ‘more mixed use’.

      I mean, places like Clonskeagh – a lot of ‘semi-d’s’ and bungalows are premises now to many young thriving businesses etc. Strange but very true.

      I was wondering does anyone have an idea how Maynooth became so big and popular so fast? Might be a bit related to your point, of having a whole new college for Dublin – in Maynooth? ? ? ? ? ! ! ! !! !

    • #741048
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Originally posted by GarrethAce
      I think as client universities generally go cap in hand to the government and ask for dough

      You could be waiting a long time, the Example of the Zhivago building in Bolton St is a typical situation. The college paid rent for 2002/03 for two floors which lay empty because the dept of Education wouldn’t give them the cash for the new desks and projectors etc.

      Originally posted by Rory W
      It’s Luce hall – although it does remind me of a tram shed

      God bless Henry Luce and all the other philanthropists who gave significant sums to Irish education through philanthropic foundations.

      The OPW site that is currently for sale on Lad Lane could have been the perfect site for TCD to expand.

    • #741049
      garethace
      Participant

      You could be waiting a long time, the Example of the Zhivago building in Bolton St is a typical situation. The college paid rent for 2002/03 for two floors which lay empty because the dept of Education wouldn’t give them the cash for the new desks and projectors etc.

      Which is what I mean exactly, this is exactly the kinds of problems Universities get themselves into, if they are not contained on a suitable stretch of land, in which they can populate with various buildings – some possibly of shit quality, and other ones that are great.

      I mean, TCD built a 10 million building, which they want to knock after only a few years. But they still get 10 million worth of use out of a building, and maybe replace it with something better – it could almost ‘work out’.

      But generally, as clients, Universities on the one hand are very big and powerful – with very expensive property and facilities, and on the other hand they are like Moscow when communism fell apart.

      Universities cannot take out short term bank loans – expect to make money on ‘the next big job’ like a company would – I don’t think.

      Then Universities have to pay staff, manage staff, manage courses, manage catering….. a lot of stuff. In a lot of ways Universities are different kinds of clients to most other situations – a very interesting client too.

      I wonder have many fifth years done thesis projects, for new buildings in Universities, with the Uni as the client?

      To be honest with you, I am finding it difficult myself to remember any thesis project I have seen, like such. One or two maybe, but not that many. I know, a lot of small art schools etc, are often done.

    • #741050
      notjim
      Participant

      ucd is out in the sticks. i work in tcd and we get lots of visitorsl; scientists who come to give talks; almost none have ever heard of ucd and none bother visiting the deptment out there because it is too far from the centre and they can’t be bothered. in fact, they are more inclined to go to Maynooth to visit there because it is on the train line.

    • #741051
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Originally posted by notjim
      ucd is out in the sticks. i work in tcd and we get lots of visitorsl; scientists who come to give talks; almost none have ever heard of ucd and none bother visiting the deptment out there because it is too far from the centre and they can’t be bothered. in fact, they are more inclined to go to Maynooth to visit there because it is on the train line.

      Notjim, by ‘deptment’ I am assuming that you mean ‘department’, but which department do you mean? Also, why have you chosen to insult UCD on an architecture site when the likelyhood is that many of the people who are viewing this site are UCD graduates in Architecture, a course which Trinity does not offer?

    • #741052
      notjim
      Participant

      sorry, no big insult, but the discussion partly touched on the importance of a city centre site versus a site with lots of room for expansion. i am argueing that a city centre site is an important asset when building and maintaining an international profile in research. my experience is that ucd doesn’t get the profile it deserves and has trouble attracting first rate international scientists because of its location, which is a pity, espessially given the quality and commitment of its existing staff.

      of course, the situation with architecture courses is different and something i know nothing about. lets not get caught into some silly ucd versus tcd arguement, the arguement was city centre versus lots of room, fitting modern lab space into a site containing old buildings versus building on green fields.

      by department i mean my own department, which is the Department of Spelling.

    • #741053
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Yes, I agree with you about the city centre location point. I think however that alot of what you are talking about is related to history and reputation if you know what I mean!? Don’t worry I am not interested in one of those silly arguments either, I was just confused by your initial point!

      Thanks for clarifying your point of view.

      Phil

    • #741054
      notjim
      Participant

      of course, history and reputation are alot of it, but, really, based on this, ucd doesn’t have as good an international repuation as it deserves whereas tcd is better than it should be. i worked abroad for a good while, in different universities, and i would never have come back to ucd because of its international status. i think the prestigeous buildings and the city centre location have a lot to do with this, along with the winner-takes all attitude people have when there is more than one university in the same city. ucc is doing very well and probably matches or beats ucd internationally, this is partly, i think, location and appearance.

    • #741055
      garethace
      Participant

      I think where the notion of fitting modern anything into old buildings, really blows its gasket, is when you begin to talk about course like Architecture in Bolton Street. I mean, Diaspora referred to the renting of a brand new office space next to bolton street itself, for use by the final year architecture students in Bolton Street. Yet it lacked any furnishings. The reason it lacked any furnishings, is because DIT spent its entire budget for computers, furnishings and everything else getting the brand new Angier Street extension fitted out for 2002/03. Now, the ironic thing about Angier Street, was that the new extension held only about 10-20% of its total capacity of students in that same period. Meaning that those tables, chairs, computers etc were basically just gathering dust and looking pretty inside their new building for most if not all of that time.

      It was one of the most expensive blunders in resources management I have seen by DIT in all my years attending that organisation as a student. The situation in Angier Street was peverse at this time too – Angier Street already had a new building with offices, and furniture – which were slightly older and cheaper in spec than the new extension – so what do you think happened? Yeah, youv’e guessed it – the employees of DIT Angier Street engaged in practically a year long ‘bitch-fight’ arguing over who should get ‘a new plush’ office in the new wing! ! ! ! ! ! And while all this crap was raging on, Bolton Street, a branch of the same organisation within a stone’s throw of Angier Street was renting out 2 floors of prime office real estate which it wasn’t even using – because it didn’t have any furniture/computers! ! ! !

      At the same time, I was stuck right in the middle of that situation, where third year in Bolton Street had 80 students packed into a space designed only for half that number, with fourth years inhabiting a space right along side them – where the noise was just so loud between all the ‘packing in’ of students that no lecturer could even conduct a proper course at all. I.e. As usually happens, the students are the first ones to lose out in the deal. But this is just typical of the behaviour of DIT down through the years. While on the one hand, they manage excellently well and cope on limited resources – even when they do manage to organise the funds required and build something and fit it out – they simple haven’t got any skill or knowledge as to how to manage those resources properly and effectively. And it is not so funny anymore, considering the sums of money that were spent on that new Angier Street extension – it is not enough anymore to show the glossy pictures and talk about the aesthetic value of new college architecture – the debate has to be broadened. This is probably why ‘Privatisation’ is such an issue nowadays with regard to Universities. There is simply no incentive for these huge organisations to do anything even slightly more efficiently or better than it always has been.

      Most of the problem in DIT revolves around the one fact, that DIT do not own their own campus – where ALL major resources of that said insitution are all within a walking distance from each other. As is the case in DCU, UCD, TCD, UL, and all Institutes of Technology all over the country. In DIT: Dublin city is our campus! I assume by that, they mean like the people who sell flowers on the streets like Molly Malone? 🙂 I mean, if Angier Street and Bolton Street had been on the same campus, then the final year students in architecture in Bolton Street would have had a proper home back in 2002/03. Not have been on the ‘waiting list’ for accomodation! The main problem with colleges is usually not lack of resources, but efficient management of those resources. That is why I think that UCD and the general concept of having one single campus. I.e. One swathe of land or real estate big enough to hold all the bits and bobs – is a far more sustainable, economical and value for money than a fragmented organisation the likes of DIT. The same goes even for large secondary schools.

    • #741056
      MB OMaoileoin
      Participant

      Garathace, I agree with your point that institutions like DIT need a campus. However, I think there is a distinction to be made between DIT which is effectively an amalgamation of institutions and Dublin University which is one institution with one constituent college. It’s no doubt too late now, but I think Dublin University should have been encouraged to found more than one constituent college (as Oxford and Cambridge Universities did over the centuries) with each college being allowed to develop its own identity, architectural style, recreational space and teaching/residential accommodation. Ultimately, there was never the necessary funding to enable this to occur – either before or after Independence – although there probably was a chance before the Act of Union as the former Irish Parliament provided substantial funding in the 18th century for many of the buildings which now form part of Trinity College.

    • #741057
      garethace
      Participant

      Well, it is an interesting debate – not too remote from the debate as to whether UCD should have remained into Dublin city centre or moved out to Belfield. From an architectural point of view etc, I love where the DIT institutions are situated – there is nothing quite like spending the time attending those colleges in Dublin’s city centre ever again, in many peoples’ lives – a lot of them may never really experience city centre working, living ever again.

      Any student of architecture in my time observed continually a great amount of change in the city over time. I started architecture in 1992, when there were soccer fields around DIT institutions, and since then an awful lot has changed. But from a pragmatist’s point of viewing things – I have to present the advantages, which are not always highlighted enough, by UCD moving out to Belfield when it did. From economic and future expansion etc, points of view.

      Not to mention the diversity and character it did manage to bring to an area, which otherwise might be just more and more rows of housing. Places like Clonskeagh, Roebuck, Botterstown, Fosters Ave, etc, etc. Similarly, is the case in DCU on north side of the city. If I had any criticism of UCD at all, it is that it is a little bit too secluded, a little bit too invisible while travelling out by the roads in that area.

      The only indication one often has of UCD being there at all, is the large water tower feature our there, which serves as some kind of landmark.

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