1916 rising sites at Mount St bridge area

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    • #709274
      colm07
      Participant

      I am looking for some help at the end of this, but first the battle of Mount St. Bridge, Easter week 1916.
      Most Dubliners know the significence of the monument on Mount St. Bridge, for those that don’t, I’ll be brief…

      Wednesday 26th April 1916, 2 batallions of the Sherwood Foresters marched from Dun Laoghaire to Dublin to help squash the rising. At Ballsbridge they got word that the Shinners were waiting in ambush at St. Stephens schoolhouse (now hotel) on the south side of the bridge. This in fact was incorrect as the volunteers had left the school and returned to Bolands late the previous night. To make this real short….as the British marched to the bridge they were cut down in a bloody crossfire from two volunteers in 25 Northumberland Road, four in the Parochial Hall (a few doors down), seven in the old Clanwilliam House and four in Roberts Yard. The battle lasted from noon to 8pm with 238 British dead or wounded at a loss of 4 volunteers. This was the bloodiest battle of the rising, a victory for the rebels…demorialising defeat for the British. Anyway…..

      Number 25 Northumberland Road at the corner of Haddington Road has a plaque dedicated to Lt. Malone who was killed in the house. Does anyone know what year that row of houses were built? The Parochial Hall is a fine building built in 1899. Maybe all those houses were built at the same time? I think Northumberland Road is one of the grandest streets in Dublin. St. Stephens schoolhouse is now a hotel but looks the same as it did in 1916. The chimneys were rebuilt but it looks very quaint indeed. The old Clanwilliam House and Roberts Yard are now gone. What about the monument on the bridge? It’s in dreadful shape…you can’t make out the engravings. Shocking!

      I was hoping someone would (if you have) post some old or new pictures of any of the above mentioned buildings. The only ones I found are on the National library site http://www.nli.ie/1916/1916_main.html Press sites and places of the rising…then Mount St. Bridge Clanwilliam House. The old schoolhouse (not old) is here http://www.irelandby.com/schoolhouse/pages/profile.htm:)
      If anyone has any comments or pics of this neck of the woods please post.

    • #787785
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster
    • #787786
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The houses on the south side of Northumberland Road (same side as the Parochial Hall, terraced and rendered), are probably mid-nineteenth century, those on the north side (same side as Schoolhouse, semi-detached redbricks), are probably late Victorian or Edwardian (c.1900?).

      Caveat: I’m doing this from memory.

    • #787787
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It was from here in 25 Northumberland road, that Mick Malone and Jimmy Grace fought in April 1916. The building still looks the same except for three windows have been added on the south side.

    • #787788
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Here’s two pictures, one of the old Clanwilliam House, the other of the new one

    • #787789
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Have you tried the Valuations Office? The tax men of old, measured buildings (and every associated building) in order to issue to owners, a bill of how much tax was due – it’s a huge historical tool now – more useful for historians than you can imagine. It traces how a building changed when extensions etc., were added. It is helpful if you have names of people who lived there. You should also try the Architectural Archive based in Merrion Square. They are incredibly helpful. You should speak to the Conservation Officer at Dublin City Council. You should also try the DOE and ask to speak to one of their architects (I think there are approximately 4 architects whose job it is to review planning applications of protected structures) – they are very helpful. Also stop by the National Photographic Library in Temple Bar and see what they have. I presume it is a protected structure and therefore it should be on the NIAH website with its RPS reference – they normally have a photograph of such structures.

      The monument on the bridge may very well be a protected structure also – check with the Conservation Officer. If it is, then it is up to the Council to ensure that it is not endangered – ask Councillors to intervene by raising it as a question at their next Council Meeting.

      Remember local history groups (check at the nearest local library to this building) may have done local project work – documents are then held at the local library. Local Librarians can be a real treasure in this regard.

    • #787790
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks Tessa and the rest of you. I would try what you said Tessa, but I live in Las Vegas now. Ok here is one pic i found of the old Clanwilliam House and Mount St. Bridge in front. This is where the Irish Thermopylae was fought. Taken in May 1916. I always prefare the old look in Dublin…Clanwilliam House today, in my opinion, is disasterous, takes up the whole block.

    • #787791
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Here’s St. Stephens Schoolhouse, now “The Schoolhouse Hotel” on the south east side of Mount St. Bridge. Construction started in 1859 and opened in 1861. It was closed in1969 by the department of education and was idle till 1997 when it was bought by the Sweeney Hotel Group. The exterior of the building looks mostly the same but the chimneys were torn down and rebuilt because of severe deterioration. I’m sure everyone will agree that the schoolhouse is a grand building.
      Photo (c) Ken Finlay

    • #787792
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Heres a fine church, St Mary’s, Haddington Road. From the bell tower of this church, the British used a machine gun on the insurgant strongholds. The construction started in 1827 and offically opened in1839. The bell tower was a later addition. Isn’t it marvelous!

    • #787793
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Here’s the monument on Mount Street bridge (Of old, McKenny bridge). The monument in itself is in good condition, but look at the engraving…it’s hardly legible! I don’t know what year this monument was erected but I am guessing the 1930’s. Anybody know? I believe this should be re-engraved. What do you think?

    • #787794
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Here is two pics of the house at number 25 Northumberland road. One was taken recently and the other in May of 1916. This famous house is at the crossroads of Northumberland and Haddington road, Ballsbridge, Dublin 4.
      Interestingly to me, there has always been a street bench outside this house for over a hundred years. Also you can see that the young tree outside number 25 (1916 pic) still exists to this day.

      The British managed to blow in the back door of this house after many hours of intense fighting on the 26th April 1916. As they raced in Lt. Michael Malone charged down the stairs at them, guns a blazing, only to be mowed down in a hail of gunfire. Jimmy Grace managed to escape but was eventually arrested.

    • #787795
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Check this out. Here is three pics of Clanwilliam place. The first is of Clanwilliam house 1916.

      The second is a very interesting pic I found on the net, taken by a man named Jim Payler. Under the pic Jim posted…..
      94E on the Grand Canal at Clanwilliam Place.
      Jim says “I took this B/W photo of one of the CIE boats on the Grand Canal in Dublin 1958/9…I was staying at the houses backing onto the distillery when we were over and the whiskey was great”

      The third is Clanwilliam Place today (c) Ken Finlay

    • #787796
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Oops, Here is a better pic.

    • #787797
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Here is two interesting pics I came across, the first you can see Clanwilliam House on the left and across the bridge the old school house.
      The other is of a British checkpoint on Mount St Bridge. Both pictures were taken In May ’16.

    • #787798
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      The men who fought at Mt St Bridge were part of the Boland’s mills (actually Bolands bakery) batallion. There is a whole thread to Boland’s but I’II use CMOO’s pics to illustrate.

    • #787799
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Mick’s grave, Glasnevin
      Eiri amach na casca 1916

    • #787800
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Photo here of Joe Clarke. Joe fought in the Parochial Hall (Northumberland Rd). The Parochial Hall stands to this day, built in 1899. I would appreciate if someone with a camera might take a pic of the Parochial Hall and post it here.

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