vitrolite shopfronts

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    • #707910
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      Aye- sorry if I bummed anyone out, but I find it hard to think of a place without thinking of the stories that the place has generated. And I do really think he just wanted to talk, so we sat a while.

      To get the thread back on track (as maybe only the derailer can), are those green shopfronts the same as the black ones still seen in some towns? Vitrolite, I think they are, with the chrome trim. Another little-appreciated feature of the Irish town- too modern for the dyed-in-the-wool heritage-conservationist, too tatty and reminiscent of a poorer period of Irish history for the progressives.

    • #757138
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      Love the vitrolite – when I was a child, Monaghan was full of those shopfronts, now all gone. Also quite a few shopfronts covered in terrazzo, not just the step but the entire facade.

    • #757139
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Interesting site here about the material. Applying it to shopfronts was quite a skilled process:

      http://www.vitrolitespecialist.com/intro/intro.htm

    • #757140
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      a nice one in Drogheda

    • #757141
      GrahamH
      Participant

      This thread spawning has got to stop! ๐Ÿ™‚

      It seems it was a fairly cheap and easy way to transform a shopfront into something very fashionable. They must’ve been very glitzy in the midst of the sombre 19th century shopfronts still prevalent all around.

    • #757142
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      Yeah, some had very modern signage for their times, I can remember some with a font very similar to Gill Sans, very clean and modern for a country Irish town.

    • #757143
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Gemma’s Newsagents in Dalkey Co. Dublin is nice. As a matter of interest, has anyone ever seen Sean Rothery’s book on Irish Shopfronts from the late 1970s? I would say that it must be quite interesting to look at.

    • #757144
      dc3
      Participant

      And more about Vitrolite on the Art Deco Ireland website

      http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Salon/6941/vitrolite.htm

    • #757145
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      Phil-

      There are three copies of the Rothery shops book in UCD libraries (just checked the catalogue)- two in Richview (one Reserve Collection), one in the mail library, none currently on loan. I once saw a copy at a book sale in the Mason’s Hall on Molesworth Street, maybe 5 years ago, for 50 pounds of old money. Part of me still regrets not buying it.
      Some of the illustrations were included in his ‘Field guide to the Buildings of Ireland’, which is still in print, and may have been in his ‘Everyday buildings of Ireland’ (both also in Richview).

      The last Vitrolite shop I came across was in Inchicore village, beside the disused cinema, but it had a site notice in the window. And that was 8/9 months ago. I got pictures, but I haven’t had a chance (had the courage?) to revisit to see if it’s still there. It crossed my mind to try to acquire it before/during ‘dismantling’, but it’s not like it’d fit in the top of the wardrobe. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #757146
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks for that Ctesiphon. I will try and check it out at some point. The reason I brought it up was that there are a few sketches of Art Deco shop fronts in his ‘Ireland and the New Architecture’ from 1991.

      Thanks again.

      Phil

    • #757147
      GrahamH
      Participant

      As Lexington mentioned Dundalk, I think I also recall quite a few similar style shopfronts in the late 80s.
      But now, as far as I know there isn’t a single one left in the town, not even one.

      It has to be said vitrolite is far from everyone’s tastes – not least as it has a decidedly tacked on, flat appearance when used on most shopfronts. Saying that, I think that’s what makes them interesting and stand out from the crowd.
      That latter corner shop Devin posted in Cork is a lovely example of the material’s use.

    • #757148
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Came across this stunning example in Bantry recently – it is in a perfect state of preservation:

      Surely one of the best in the country?!
      The panels are excellent condition, as is the chrome trim around its lovely big picture windows:

      And the oh-so-glamorous overdoor detail :):

      A remarkable survivor. Indeed so many shopfronts from all periods survive in the southwest that you just don’t get anymore in the developed east and increasingly developed mid-west – shopfronts you forgot ever existed like tiled or mosaicked facades from the 40s and 50s that were once prevalent in every town in the country until 1996.
      Most of them relatively insignificant architecturally, but culturally important.

      When saying there were no vitrolites left in Dundalk I forgot all about Connollys (perhaps understandably ;)) – but it’s notable all the same as seemingly being the last vitrolite shopfront in a town that used to be full of them. A later plastic is used for the sign.

      Haven’t been in the shop in years, but I think it just might have vestiges of Victorian/Edwardian cornicing inside – serving to highlight this practice of putting glitzy new facades onto old buildings.

    • #757149
      dc3
      Participant

      A page about vitrolite is on the Art Deco Ireland website at
      http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Salon/6941/vitrolite.htm

      There is another fine example in Limerick
      http://www.geocities.com/Paris/Salon/6941/leonards2lrk072003.jpg

      and there are two vitrolite shop fronts in Upper Leeson Street, one shop is now vacant however.

    • #757150
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      Upper Leeson Street

      (forgot I had this – will look through the rest tonight as I’m sure I must have more from around the country)

    • #757151
      Morlan
      Participant

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      Haha, great picture Graham – Attack of the Auld Biddies or what! ๐Ÿ˜€

    • #757152
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      @Paul Clerkin wrote:

      Upper Leeson Street
      (forgot I had this – will look through the rest tonight as I’m sure I must have more from around the country)

      Used to be a sports shop until a few years ago. At least Spar kept the front when they took over the space for their off licence.
      This stretch of Leeson Street has changed much recently- narrower range of shops and less of a community feel, unfortunately. (I used to live across the road.)

    • #757153
      Devin
      Participant

      @Morlan wrote:

      Haha, great picture Graham – Attack of the Auld Biddies or what! ๐Ÿ˜€

      Actually that’s my pic, Morlan.

    • #757154
      Devin
      Participant

      Here’s a few:

      Ranelagh, Dublin. This was a launderette up to the late-รขโ‚ฌหœ90s. Then it was taken over by Nectar restaurant who fortunately recognised the value of the authentic รขโ‚ฌหœ50s front. But more recently the baby blue vitrolite panels were replaced with stainless steel :confused: (it was the only one I know of in this colour in the country).

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      A fine specimen in Arklow.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Roscommon Town. The shop was closing down when this was taken a few years ago, so it could be gone now (is there anyone in Roscommon to confirm whether or not itรขโ‚ฌโ„ขs still there?).

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Naas – nice.

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      Carrickmacross. Closed but maintaining its dignity.

      There’s a fair few left around the country.
      Better leave it at that and not give all my photos away to archiseek!!

    • #757155
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Great ventilation grill there on the last one – indeed it’s interesting how nearly all of them not only feature a grill, but also place emphasis on their design and material used.

      The Jordan one is my favourite, and fantastic sashes upstairs too, tucked in under the eaves :). What’s the likelihood of them still being there….?

      The coloured version of vitrolite is striking, esp the blue, though frankly the peachy coloured one doesn’t quite do it for me – yuck!

      Subsidence always adds an interesting twist to architecture – as with Boyles ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • #757156
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      @Devin wrote:

      But more recently the baby blue vitrolite panels were replaced with stainless steel :confused: (it was the only one I know of in this colour in the country).

      Is there a chance that the vitrolite is still under the stainless steel? The pics are inconclusive- the window trim seems to be from the previous incarnation, at any rate. I do hope so.

    • #757157
      Devin
      Participant

      Yeah, I was thinking that myself, but it didn’t seem to be (underneath) on closer inspection.
      Actually, I went in and asked one day but the only person there didn’t have good english – meant to go back again but never got around to it…

    • #757158
      dc3
      Participant

      Nice shots Devin.
      Must dig out a few more of mine to post up – I had the Arklow one also.

      Regarding the Ranelagh Laundrette -the vitrolite was damaged and the metal finish is, I think, only placed over the lower vitrolite. Vitrolite is very strong when attacked directly but a bad blow on the edge of the sheet can be fatal, this is easily done when bringing in mechanical equipment through a narrow door.

      An edge on whack leaves a big chunk likely to be missing.

    • #757159
      Devin
      Participant

      That’s interesting. It’s quite sad when you see them around the country and a few panels are cracked; ‘cos you know the whole front is likely to be replaced – you can’t just go and get a replacement panel like you can a piece of timber…

      Ranelagh: Yes when it was first converted to the restaurant (circa 2000) the metal was placed only over the lower section of the front, as seen in the first pic. But in the second pic – taken yesterday – the metal has been put over the rest of it too.

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      The Jordan one is my favourite, and fantastic sashes upstairs too, tucked in under the eaves :). What’s the likelihood of them still being there….?

      That pic is recent enough – they’re still there. There’s a mad old dear in the shop as well!!

    • #757160
      dc3
      Participant

      A little more vitrolite from Ireland.

      Photos were taken in Cashel in 1999.

    • #757161
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Wow – that latter one is a great example!
      There’s nothing like a bit of symmetry. Those gates are a dying feature on Irish streetscapes too.

    • #757162
      lexington
      Participant

      ๐Ÿ™ Unfortunately, hoardings have been erected around the old Buckley Bros. shopfront on Oliver Plunkett Street, Cork with the old green vitrolite facade now well and truly removed. For years (more than 20 years under Edward Moriarty), the shop acted as one of those dying breed of traditional Irish restaurant-cum-shops selling all sorts of buns, tarts, tobacco papers, vegetables etc. The restaurant to the back catered to generations of the ‘old breed’ of Corkonians who had made a visit to the premises a weekly staple in the schedule for years on end.

      Works are proceeding now to install a new shopfront – of a more modern styling – to cater for a new Butlers Irish Chocolates cafe. Could they have achieved the same by maintaining the vitrolite? Quite possibly.

      Thanks to Devin for the above image.

    • #757163
      Morlan
      Participant

      Very nice indeed ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • #757164
      dc3
      Participant

      [IMG]ace.jpg{/IMG]

      Here is one from Kilkenny

      Taken about 10 years ago

    • #757165
      Devin
      Participant

      The end of Buckley Bros – what a shame.

    • #757166
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Oh dear – is there the faintest possibility though that the upper facade was removed just to allow for the installation of those I-beams?
      The green vitrolite may have worked quite well with Butlers – reminicent of minty chocolate…

      Clearly it doesn’t fit in with their sultry ‘traditonal’ image of black timber shopfronts ๐Ÿ™

    • #757167
      anto
      Participant

      one less shoe shop on Oliver plunkett street. There was loads of them last time I looked.

    • #757168
      rayc
      Participant

      14 MacCurtain Street, Cork.

      Original Vitrolite facade and signage. Now operating as a gallery.

      see http://launderettegallery.com

    • #757169
      Devin
      Participant

      Nice, but it’s a pity about the loss of the original window & door frames / trim. The replacement is not sympathetic to the front at all.

      This is an example of the same thing in Longford Town; a nice vitrolite front with (unusually) white panels down the sides, but with unsympathetic ’70s door / window aluminium inserts. It used to be a butcher shop but has been closed now for a while. I gave a talk on shopfront design last week in Longford and mentioned it … said the front should be repaired and incorporated should the shop reopen:

    • #757170
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Though you do have to consider that 1940s/50s vitrolite in the 1970s was the 70s muck of today.
      Indeed in most quarters it probably still is.

      The white above is attractive alright – though the window above equally so ๐Ÿ˜‰

      The washing symbols at the top of the window in rayc’s picture are a fun feature.

    • #757171
      Devin
      Participant
      Graham Hickey wrote:
      The white above is attractive alright – though the window above equally so ]One of the very few buildings in Longford with sash windows surviving:

    • #757172
      GrahamH
      Participant

      No surprises there then.

      Interesting to see what is a very common phenomenon there next to Blacks – the residential accommodation above with replacement frames, but the comparitively unimportant non-residential part left untouched downstairs.

    • #757173
      Devin
      Participant

      Some towns are worse than others though, & the sash is nearly extinct in Longford.

      On closer inspection the top floor window is some kind of early-20th cen. casement. Still, you’re theory holds.
      …nice crumbly old chimney..

    • #757174
      Foamcutter
      Participant

      Came across this on a trip to Dublin, it is on the East Wall Rd. I don’t know if it is genuine Vitrolite but it looks like an uptodate version.

    • #757175
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Know the building well – probably plastic in the sign, though it does create the vitrolite effect alright.
      Probably intentional too given the vague 1940s architecture of the building.

    • #757176
      Rusty Cogs
      Participant

      Ah, my local, There used to be 13 public houses on East Wall Rd, seemingly when the pre containerisation ports were in full swing.

    • #757177
      Devin
      Participant

      ANOTHER VITROLITE SHOPFRONT FOR THE CHOP?

      .

      These two buildings (above) on the main street in Ardee have recently been granted planning permission for demolition by Louth Co. Co. (Ref. 04/1684). The plan has now gone to appeal (ABP Ref. PL 15.214750). The buildings are located in an Architectural Conservation Area. One of them has a classic country-town drapery shop with a vitrolite front (below).

      Amusingly, the Monaghan-based “Conservation Consultants” who prepared the report on the buildings submitted with the planning application make no mention of the vitrolite; instead, the shopfront is described as a “modern timber shopfront” – hmmm.

      Louth’s decision shows that Councils are not taking ACAs seriously – they were supposed to give stronger protection but it’s just ‘business as usual’ if a developer comes in with a plan to redevelop main street Irish town buildings…

    • #757178
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Vitrolite is an interesting example of ‘borderline heritage’ – both in terms of age and physical qualities it doesn’t quite conform with what we expect as worthy of conservation. It’s neither old enough, beautiful enough, or striking enough (even as a contemporary 1940s modernist building may be) to fit into the conservation model we’ve built up over the years.

      At this stage though, I think more strident efforts ought to be made by local authorities in protecting vitrolite shopfronts where they survive, not least as there’s precious little of them left, especially on the east coast where they’re now almost non-existent.
      Culturally it is equally important, if not always aesthetically – as they are one of the few remnants of an almost vanished Ireland, a time we’ve exceptionally little left to remind us of as frankly nothing was built during the 1940s and 50s outside of the housing sector.

      Whilst a small shopfront need not hold up a town or village centre redevelopment, invariably vitrolite shopfronts are built onto earlier vernacular buildings, which combined are an integral feature of Irish urban areas, and what precious few survive ought to be safeguarded as much as is possible.
      On there more clear cut issue of replacing these shopfronts with heritage models – there ought to be an outright ban on the practice.

    • #757179
      Devin
      Participant

      Absolutely. I have an example of an interesting square-tiled ’60s shopfront in Blessington being replaced with a really horrid ‘heritage’ model. I’ll root it out & post it soon.

      This vitrolite in Inchicore village dissapeared within the last year (whole building demolished, along with adjoining mid-20th cen. cinema). ctesiphon also has some photos of this, as mentioned on the previous page:

    • #757180
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      Are you sure it’s the same building? (:o Embarrassingly similar pic).
      I’m including this charming little chemist too from, if memory serves, Dolphin’s Barn, which, though not Vitrolite, is a good example of the kind of mid-20th c. design that falls through the heritage cracks.

      I have a print photo of the Inchicore shop and the pink cinema- I’ll try to get a scan (or do one of my trademark digital pics of a print, taken on the trusty kitchen table).

    • #757181
      kmeg
      Participant

      The Seabank House on the East Wall Rd (formerly ‘The Wharf Tavern’) probably isn’t going to win any awards but it’s better than the of the proposals that went before. Portholes and other parts of vessels truely belong on the sea.

    • #757182
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      Just a quick follow up- here’s the cinema (now demolished according to Devin) alongside the Vitrolite s/f in Inchicore.

    • #757183
      Devin
      Participant

      And here’s my one of it (fortunately different pictures this time ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ๐Ÿ™‚ ) :

    • #757184
      Devin
      Participant

      The Blessington shopfront I mentioned (sorry about the pole in the first picture, but it was the only place I could stand at the time). It was nothing spectacular, just a bit of ‘60s whimsy, but what a bland replacement, and of course the little sash overhead also gets the business!

    • #757185
      paddyinthehouse
      Participant

      I took these photos ages ago, when this thread was still active, and never got around to posting them.

      The shopfront of the Pembroke Restaurant, Pembroke St., Cork, deserves a mention on this thread as a stunning contemporary use of the material.

      The replacement for the Buckley Bros. frontage is included also – looks quite smart in its own right, but somewhat lacklustre compared to what it replaced.

    • #757186
      GrahamH
      Participant

      wow – thanks for the pic of The Pembroke paddyinthehouse: looks achingly smart :). Lovely colour.

      The new look (or should that be old look?) Butler’s is very much their standard offering, if a bit sharper than usual. Interesting that they’ve also seen fit to replace what seem to have been c.1920s plate sashes upstairs with Georgian reproductions, bringing the whole building in line with these Regencyesque heritage commercial premises you see in places like Bath and certain parts of London. Are these even Georgian buildings?
      Nonetheless the gharish yellow paint would gone down a treat amongst the fashionable of 1810s Cork, even if no longer made with horse urine ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

      The neighbouring buildings look terrible now, especially with all that PVC muck.

    • #757187
      Devin
      Participant

      @paddyinthehouse wrote:

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      Interesting that they’ve also seen fit to replace what seem to have been c.1920s plate sashes upstairs with Georgian reproductions, bringing the whole building in line with these Regencyesque heritage commercial premises you see in places like Bath and certain parts of London.

      The whole building before alterations can be seen below.

      Yes, I don’t see why the plate-glass 1st-floor sashes had to be replaced either. They were old in themselves and told a story of the building. Good conservation practice is about respecting later alterations as well.

      I sincerely hope the very old – probably late-18th century – sashes on the 2nd & 3rd floors have been retained and not just replicated along with the first floor. Unnecessary loss of historic fabric really annoys me!
      .

    • #757188
      GrahamH
      Participant

      So it is Georgian, and early at that! What a fantastic array of windows, including that tell-tale keystone stranded on the gable wall ๐Ÿ™‚
      If anything these repro sashes are now even more incongruous and damaging to the fabric in light of the above images, as the plates would very likely have been preceded with chunky frames as per the upper floors, and not slimline post-1770ish models as have been installed.

    • #757189
      Devin
      Participant

      Yeah, they are quite an early terrace – early to mid-18th cen. afaik. The other giveway is the near-flushness of the sashes on the top two floors.

      It’s also amusing the way the early-20th cen. Post Office building has been joined on, partly covering one of the gable windows!

    • #757190
      Devin
      Participant

      .

      Eaton’s in Terenure in 2000, when the cakeshop was still open.

      And in 2006, after conversion to a Thai restaurant.

      The problem with vitrolite shopfronts is that a large part of their character and effect derives from the design of original lettering and signage, so when this is removed they can look relatively bland and indistinct.

    • #757191
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Agreed, much of their effect comes from the contrast between the lettering and the vitrolite background. I also notice that the air vents are missing in the updated version of this shopfront. These vents are a signature of this period, and it is a pity to see them gone.

    • #757192
      Devin
      Participant

      In rare cases a new shop tenant will recognise the quality of the existing shopfront and have sympathetic lettering designed, like this chemists on Dunville avenue in Ranelagh which has used a century gothic or similar font. Looks smart (good on you Orla!) :
      .

    • #757193
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      Does indeed look well…

    • #757194
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      That before-and-after raises an interesting question: was the base originally marbled or black?

      (Not to mention the sad disappearance of O’Neill Shoes which was there when I lived on Moyne Road in 2003, though I’m not sure if the steel windows were still in situ at that time. What date was your pic taken?)

    • #757195
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Wow – that looks fantastic. An advertisment for restoration if ever you saw one.
      The black skirting looks especially good – that marble probably dates from the 80s, replacing earlier cracked vitrolite which was always vunerable down there.

      Indeed this whole terrace seems to be of vitrolite, and most impressively restored recently at that.
      Pity such consideration didn’t extend above ground level and you-know-who ๐Ÿ™

    • #757196
      Devin
      Participant

      The marbled stallriser may have been travertine, an interesting material from the same era as vitrolite, or it may be just plain ol’ eighties polished marble as GH says. It doesn’t sit well with the green vitrolite, so you can’t imagine it being original, as people didn’t do things sloppily before the 1970s! I agree that the current black looks better whether original or not.

      The first picture was taken in 2000.

    • #757197
      GrahamH
      Participant

      So what is the black material? Is vitrolite available in any form today?

    • #757198
      Devin
      Participant

      Well there’s the stuff used in the Pembroke Restaurant posted by paddyinthehouse on the previous page which seems to be a modern form of vitrolite. Something similar is used on the River Island shopfront on Grafton Street and on the Pen Corner opposite the Central Bank.

      The picture of the Dunville Pharmacy was taken a few months ago. I’ve forgotten exactly what the black material looked like – matt or shiny – and I can’t tell by viewing the picture at full size either.

    • #757199
      dc3
      Participant

      No Vitrolite is long out of production, it was also relatively expensive to make when new.

      There is a person in the USA who has a large supply of Vitrolite, which he bought up from stocks held by suppliers. The main source now would be architectural salvage, but as it is easy to damage when being removed, there may be little in those places too!

    • #757200
      corcaighboy
      Participant

      This is a shot of D. O’ Mahony’s shop on 6 Parliment Street in Cork City. Am no expert, but seems like vitrolite to me. Not too many other examples left in Cork as far as I can see, although West Cork still has quite a few (although quickly disappearing).

    • #757201
      corcaighboy
      Participant

      And here is another one (again, I think!). This is the relatively new frontage for a restaurant attached to The Imperial Hotel but fronting onto Pembroke Street.

    • #757202
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Yes a rare modern-day equivalent that looks pretty impressive in all its glory – I think we had another view of that premises here before. Extraordinary that such expense is lavished on the ground floor, while the upper facade left as a sea of mediocrity, with plastic windows, typical yellow paint and surface-mounted drainage.

      Nice, well proportioned, probably original teak shopfront in pic one too ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #757203
      Devin
      Participant

      @corcaighboy wrote:

      Not too many other examples left … although West Cork still has quite a few (although quickly disappearing).

      I know somebody who is doing a nationwide study of vitrolite shopfronts, rounding up all the surviving examples. A most worthwhile project. I think she will make it available to the public as well, when it’s done.

    • #757204
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      Great! One of those ‘One day I’d like to…’ ideas that crossed my mind a while back. Glad to see someone’s already on it. Is it far advanced? Should we be reporting sightings of Vitrolite in out-of-the-way locations to her/you?:)

    • #757205
      Devin
      Participant

      Not sure exactly what stage it’s at at the mo. I’ll keep you updated when I find out.

    • #757206
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      would love to publish that….

    • #757207
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Sounds fascinating indeed! A very worthwhile project.

      Well as dc3 mentioned earlier, here’s the second of the vitrolites on Upper Leeson Street in Dublin, now vacant:

      Lovely transparent, light quality to it, and as typical is sited on standard Victorian stock:

      The vents:

      Some detail:

      Interestingly the original mint green vitrolite has been covered over in this sticky-backed almost An Post green plastic material. You can see the original colour peeping over the vent in the previous image. I could pick at it fairly easily, so it should come off.

      Attractive chamfered corners too:

      Some damage there.

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