Gregorius III

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  • in reply to: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churches #773230
    Gregorius III
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    @Praxiteles wrote:

    St. Colman’s Cathedral, Cobh, Co. Cork

    Just admire this wonderful example of gorgously air-tight double glazing on the lancets of the South aisle in Cobh Cathedral and think of the acceleration with which the lead work holding the glass must be deteriorating behind it. Indeed, if it has taken only 10 years for the newly installed “restored” wooden floor to come up ad wreck the unprotected mosaics; and even less than 10 years for the internal bath sheeting of he South side to collappse due to water ingress from a wrongly finstlled new roof and incompetent gutters; and for the walls of the baptistery to disintigrate due to the leaking roof on the north tower on the west fcade – then it should take that long for most of this glass just to fall into the south aisle some day soon.

    Is there ever a case [different climate] in which double-glazing is a positive step? In the past months I encountered a new church-building with glazing over their “2nd hand” XIX c. stained glass windows, I mentioned that it was bad for the preservation of the windows – they however received quite different advice during their installation…

    in reply to: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churches #773229
    Gregorius III
    Participant

    @Praxiteles wrote:

    Deapite the assurances from very dodgy sources, it would appear that those concerend people were correct in their concerns and can now demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt that “damage” has been caused to the building by the 1992-2000 “restoration programme. We quote the clerical gusher below:

    “Since then, some concerned people have organised opposition to the proposals. At their request, people have signed a petition that the proposals not be implemented. Many who were asked for their signature had not seen the proposals. Some were under the erroneous impression that the original altar and sanctuary were being destroyed, or other damage caused to the building.

    very manipulative…. thank God so many are acting as watchmen over ireland’s rich heritage…. surely this dark night of destruction will pass, and these beautiful houses of God will be preserved for future generations…. good work praxiteles, et al.!

    Gregorius III
    Participant

    That is an interesting article by Scruton.

    Gregorius III
    Participant

    @Praxiteles wrote:

    And here we have news of another (highly significant) re-reordering. This time it is the Westminster Metropolitan Cathedral in London. The temporary altar raised on a wooden platform which was installed in the choir immediately in front of the sanctuary has been removed and the celebration of Mass returns to the High Altar.

    Praxiteles, you should have provided us with a picture of this altar in it’s current, renovated state. However, I see why you have not done so, amazingly there’s still not one to be found [easily] on the Internet. Here’s what I could find:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/blahflowers/3582175675/

    A photographer whose eye for beauty naturally cropped out the picnic table (in this picture from a few weeks back). I suppose this is generally what we would see today. It will however be much more magnificent and striking without the platform – which may be concealing some more marble stairs… and possibly there’s even a communion rail trapped beneath it. I’m sure we will see more pictures of it soon enough though.

    @Praxiteles wrote:

    A further significant re-reordering is expected to be inaugerated in a couple of weeks time. This is the restored Cappella Paolina in the Vatican Palace.

    It’s nice to see the “Benedictine Reform” continuing to happen just around the corner from his own apartment…

    Today, I heard someone speaking of “Our Holy Father’s silent revolution of love” [referring to his encyclicals and other words of his] and I thought to myself… yes, he is a man of many revolutions… some aren’t so silent as this one of “love” about which he was speaking.

    Using the phrase in a different light one can say that what we are seeing in his papacy truly is a revolution of love – of love for both truth and beauty, especially as they are reflected and modeled in the Church’s liturgy.

    Gregorius III
    Participant

    @gunter wrote:

    and now, thanks to wikipedia, anyone can know a little bit about even the most obscure 20th century theo-philosopher.

    I wouldn’t quite group Hans Urs von Balthasar as an “obscure” theologian [or “theo-philosopher”], but I do agree, Wikipedia is a very handy tool, especially for disseminating new ideas and the most current information.

    Gregorius III
    Participant

    More has been lost than just canvases or some simple stencil-work: many of the faithful seem to have followed them out the door – or perhaps Beauty and her sisters are holding them hostage…

    … maybe it’s time to start negotiations.

    Gregorius III
    Participant

    Once again, Tribe presents a balanced article calling for the use of “continuity, beauty, and dignity” as criterion for what is to be properly used in a holy space and in the liturgy, rather than oversimplifying it to an “ancient versus modern” debate. Also praiseworthy is the call to move away from using “post-Conciliar” as a blanket term for “bad art” or “primitivism”. This caricature of the period of and following the 1960s is unhealthy and abused and its use seems to cause a great divide between many of the clergy, dividing many of the young and the old. Tribe’s ideas and suggestions are obviously not new, but they are definitely worthy of continued study.

    Gregorius III
    Participant

    .

    Gregorius III
    Participant

    @Praxiteles wrote:

    Lenten Veils (Fastentücher, also called Hungertücher [“hunger veils”]) or vela quadrigesimalia, curtains that have been used (since the 10th century) to veil altars during Lent, interpreted as a symbol of the separation of the repentant sinner from the Church…

    You say the veils are to demonstrate the “separation of the repentant sinner from the Church.” Why is it to show the separation of “repentant sinners” and not just “all sinners”? Why would they emphasize the separation of those who have repented? Or, is it to show that even our repentance is fruitless without the sacrifice of Christ?

    Also, the below post of the Lenten Veil in Carinthia allows the altar (and thus the whole Sacrifice of the Mass) to be seen only blocking the “rood” (or cross.) Yet, the Lenten Veil hanging in the Gurk Cathedral seems to block the whole sanctuary. Is this because it is not hanging as it once would have?

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