djasmith

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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 38 total)
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  • in reply to: The Great 1930s Scheme #763762
    djasmith
    Participant

    Hi folks,

    I’m trying to get my hands on something very specific, and I’m not sure if this is the right place but I’ll chance it!

    I’m looking for a cast iron fireplace surround to match those of the front room of the 1929 batch of council houses (Marino & Inchicore). They were slightly wider than the bedroom fireplace surrounds, and the the back room had a bigger surround and arch with a range. So I’m being quite specific!

    They’re a cast iron fireplace surround with the 3 flowers across the top under the mantle.

    Anyone who can point me in the right direction please pm me asap.

    Regards,
    DJA

    in reply to: Cycling in Irish Cities #761524
    djasmith
    Participant

    It’s not the moving cars on our roads that are the problem but rather the ones which are parked. I cycle all over this city day in and day out from templeogue right over to santry quite often. I have built up a bank of pictures of cars and vans clearly showing the company name which are blocking cycle lanes. The trouble is when you are trying to navigate your way down camden street and then you come across some irresponsible ‘parker’ who has left their vehicle in a bus or cycle lane. the danger is then trying to get past them.

    on the point of helmets – Ive always worn one. I’ve had 2 major enough accidents in my cycling career, and both of them left me in hospital. On both occassions I was told in hospital that without the helmet (which was smashed both times) I wouldn’t be where I am today. I’m not one of these people who would like to enforce helmets, I feel we could enforce sensible parking or something like that, but if people could see the 2 helmets that I have they would think twice about not wearing one.

    in reply to: Irish say no to PVC windows #745022
    djasmith
    Participant

    hehe I was wondering who would be the first to spot that reaplacement!!! we all saw it coming though! The 1st time I drove past it after the change it took me a few minutes to figure out which house in the block had been changed. It’s amazing how something like the windows can change the look of a house almost beyond recognition.

    There’s a corpo house on captains road I think I posted it before that’s up for sale now with all original fittings…. another one that will be ruined i suppose!

    in reply to: Restoring sash windows #752387
    djasmith
    Participant

    I’ve done a lot of research on the topic as I’ve mentioned here before, and I couldn’t say a bad work about Bolgers, they’ve given me nothing but help and advice and I think they’re fantastic. I have been in their workshops and I’ve seen first hand projects where they do salvage as much as possible on projects. Perhaps it was under different managment 10 years ago and hence your dissatisfaction, but certainly I’ve nothing but positive to say about them.

    in reply to: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churches #771917
    djasmith
    Participant

    @Praxiteles wrote:

    To return to neo-Byzantine church architecture, and to England, the chief example is of course Westminster Cathedral by Francis Bentley.

    http://www.westminstercathedral.org.uk/art/art_bentley.html

    reminds me a lot of flinders street station in melbourne

    in reply to: Liffey Cable Cars – Pointless Gimmick or…. #766806
    djasmith
    Participant

    maybe Sydney has got too many buses, but after using a lot of their public transport i was never left waiting for a bus so maybe we could learn something from them

    in reply to: Liffey Cable Cars – Pointless Gimmick or…. #766803
    djasmith
    Participant

    I’m only back from Sydney and anyone who has seen their public transport network will agree with me that its more than amazing. I’ve been to Melbourne a few times and thought theirs was good ’til I saw Sydneys. The best part of it is the monorail loop system. It would be more than perfect for dublin in terms of minimum disruption on the ground, minimum digging up roads etc, all electric, and it can follow the course of streets and buildings that are already there. All of the stations are built into shopping centres etc. With some planning they could be incorporated into new builds. Has it been considered before? much better than any cable cars

    in reply to: Metro R.I.P. #736864
    djasmith
    Participant

    why not extend the malahide dart line on over around the estury and to the airport – rather than a whole new line out from the city. with some lateral thinking that could also serve swords and ballymun

    in reply to: How well do you know Dublin? #766346
    djasmith
    Participant

    @GrahamH wrote:

    Got it in one, gunter. It terminates the vista from the ILAC looking south. Would have thought that to be one of the easier ones!

    Can’t place the outstanding case though…

    Thats the lot – and yes the firefighting one is on the side of a trinity building along pearse street.

    in reply to: How well do you know Dublin? #766339
    djasmith
    Participant

    no……… ye’re right about the abbey street building and also the ‘pig trap’ on the south docks…. Still the firefighting plaque and the gable……. And they’re buildings that most of ye walk past every day…. opposite sides of town though…

    in reply to: How well do you know Dublin? #766337
    djasmith
    Participant

    @jdivision wrote:

    Y is Carvills on Camden Street I think

    Not Camden street……… Try the other side of town…

    in reply to: How well do you know Dublin? #766329
    djasmith
    Participant

    some probably more obvious than others……

    W.

    X.

    Y.

    Z.

    in reply to: the work of J.J. McCarthy #775201
    djasmith
    Participant

    http://www.irish-architecture.com/buildings_ireland/dublin/terenure/church_lge.html

    like this…. Joey’s in Terenure…… 8 long years of school there…….. Can’t remember where I read it but the spire there was unfinished. Likewise on another thread with a picture of the original plans of Mount Argus church there was an amazing spire planned (McCarthy), but the design of the two smaller ‘square’ spires was opted for.

    Just seen that it was probably on archiseek that I read of the unfinished spire

    in reply to: The Great 1930s Scheme #763761
    djasmith
    Participant

    Crumlin Hall on Cashel Road got a facejob recently (hideous in my opinion). What it was before is in another post above.

    in reply to: The Great 1930s Scheme #763760
    djasmith
    Participant

    Just an update on the amazing work on The Bru at the bottom of the village. I don’t pass it too often I cut through captains road etc, but I was amazed when i did the other day! It’s looking well!

    Not exactly the 1930’s scheme, but the scheme had HUGE effects on this building as a school in the 1930’s.

    in reply to: O’ Connell Street, Dublin #730798
    djasmith
    Participant

    Someday i’ll get a real camera I really will! Here’s my attempt to capture it from where I was anyway…

    I had the best place in all of Dublin! Stewarding at the crossing point at abbey street, so I was right at the edge of the parade, and also where the police and the the amazing cavalry unit were.


    O’ Connell Street at the ready just as the sunshine came out 😀


    Start of the parade


    Cav 😀 Weren’t the bikes just amazing! Not a spec of dirt on them! Wow! (trust me I know the work that goes into keeping them like that and the trouble they go to)

    in reply to: Archer’s Garage #715674
    djasmith
    Participant

    @GrahamH wrote:

    8/12/2006

    Developer faces fine of €13m

    Probe underway after early morning convent demolition

    A developer has illegally demolished a 19th century convent which was in the process of becoming a listed building.

    Homebuilders Kimpton Vale Ltd razed the building on November 5, just two weeks after Dublin City Council began the process of adding the Presentation convent in Terenure to the Record of Protected Structures (RPS).


    © Irish Independent

    And the company faces fines of up to €12.7m after the illegal demolition. Yesterday, the council confirmed the destruction of the building was unauthorised, and that enforcement proceedings have begun.

    The convent was part of a three-acre site on Terenure Road West which was sold in April for over €15m. On October 18, Labour councillor John Gallagher proposed it be added to the RPS, which was agreed by councillors. But just over two weeks later, workers employed by the developer began to bulldoze the convent at 7am on a Saturday.

    By the time council inspectors arrived on site two hours later, most of the building was gone. A decision was taken to allow the remainder of the building to be destroyed, as it posed a danger to the public.


    © Irish Independent

    “Two notices have been served on the developer,” a council spokesman confirmed. “It is an unauthorised development. It had been proposed to list the building; the difficulty for us was the developer went in before the process was complete.”

    “We had a dangerous building inspector on site on the Saturday morning. By the time he arrived, it (the convent) was half demolished. In the interests of public safety, the remainder was demolished.”

    The enforcement proceedings are being taken under the 2000 Planning and Development Act, which states: “Any person who, without lawful authority, causes damage to a protected structure or a proposed protected structure shall be guilty of an offence.” The council can insist the building is reinstated, or issue a fine of up to €1,900. But if it decides to take legal action, a court can impose a fine of up to €12.7m. “I’m disappointed it was done when discussions were ongoing with the council,” Mr Gallagher said last night.

    “The ultimate sanction for demolishing a habitable house is reinstatement. The building is gone, and the developer shouldn’t get away with it. There’s a procedure and it should be followed.

    “There should be some standard that applies, the procedure should not be to knock the building.

    “It’s a fine building, and should be considered part of the city’s heritage.”

    City managers have previously forced developers to reinstate buildings after they were illegally destroyed. In 1999, the Art Deco Archer’s Garage on Fenian Street was razed, but the council forced the developer to rebuild it.

    It was unclear last night if the developer was told the building was to be listed. Kimpton Vale were not available for comment.

    Paul Melia

    © Irish Independent

    So the practice rumbles on. At least local authorities have teeth nowadays – including that essential protective provision of the inclusion of proposed protected structures in the 2000 Act. The same also applies to proposed Architectural Consevation Areas. What’s most astonishing about this case is the notion that the developer thought they could get away with this in 2006. Sure half the non-professional poeple on this website alone could tell him the council would be on his back before he got out of bed that morning.
    It’s possible they had no idea – though the 7am start on a Saturday perhaps says otherwise.

    As much as it’s a punishment for developers on such insanely valuable sites, the rebuilding of one-off structures like this seems rather fruitless to me. The fabric has been lost. Of course if the underlying idea in this case was to demolish and be ‘forced’ to rebuild the basic structure but to a modern interior standard, and without any of the hassle of converting PS, they’ve achieved their aim. Hopefully the fine will hit hard.

    I remember hearing about this. My sister came home with it as a roumer from school. Couldn’t believe it. The place is still a building site, however the school next door (presentation primary, dating from 1889 just like the convent) has managed to gain an extra couple of classrooms on the site of the former convent

    in reply to: Victorian/Edwardian Window Styles #749298
    djasmith
    Participant

    Ah here i go reviving old threads via google searches again! I would be inclined to agree with graham and say that the house has sashes rather than casements. There’s lots of similar houses around the harolds cross area from the same era and they all have sashes with just the basic 1 over 1. The proportions of the window dont seem right for casements – which are what a lot of houses around terenure would have had…… but only downstairs….. sashes on the upper floors…. thats another possibility.

    Whilst on the topic I’m making a victorian sash window for my Leaving Cert construction project and have unearthed an awful lot of technical specs if anybody is interested. Also I can recommend an excellent joiner (friend of my dads) who does an awful lot of high quality replica sash / casement windows and doors for restoration jobs on houses. Glenlyon Enterprises in Dublin 12 – he’ll be in the phonebook.

    And finally one question which i can’t manage to find a direct answer to…. it came up in conversation here before on the ‘irish say no to pvc windows’ thread…… whats the difference between the horns on a victorian and a georgian sash window?? I’ve managed to find the differences in the glazing bars etc… but not the horns…

    Dave.

    Edit:

    On looking at the above picture of the window and the door, id say that casements with the stained glass on top of them were on the lower floor, with the 1 over 1 sashes on top. ill Get some pictures of similar houses tomorrow afternoon. I know this thread is so old that the job is probably long since finished but its nice to know!

    in reply to: Irish say no to PVC windows #745004
    djasmith
    Participant

    OK I was out and about on the rothar today with the camera in between the showers! here’s a few pictures of the remaining steel windows around my area. As I said there are so so many more around and I will eventually get around to photographing them all. I wont bore you by putting them all up here! here’s a taster of a few which can hopefully compliments grahams pictures. Please excuse the poor quality of the pics!


    The houses on my road. Unfortunately none of our side have original steels, but there’s quite a few on this side that do.


    And another 2 further up


    Above the shops


    In my opinion, the best preserved corpo house around – The Captains Road, Crumlin


    Perrystown


    A pretty double, although the picture doesn’t show it at its best


    This house is rather nice on Rockfield


    Further up on Rockfield, but for sale (eg big changes!!!)


    Finally a house under construction on Rockfield….. someone tell me please how they managed to obtain permission for a house of redbrick on this road?!?!?!

    Dave.

    in reply to: Irish say no to PVC windows #745001
    djasmith
    Participant

    Once again some fantastic pictures from Graham! Yes the steel windows are dying out unfortunately, there’s only 2 houses on my road of 24 houses with them left – a whole 8%!!!!!! wow! I’m forever saying ill take pictures of these houses – there are so so many of them scattered and I could point out almost all of them. There was a fantastic double fronted house with steel windows on Wainsfort Road up until about 5 weeks ago when they were replaced – and me being as slow as I am didn’t take any photos. The only house with steels left now on Wainsfort road has big plywood boards up around it – that can only mean big renovations!!!

    As for the original joinary in the 30’s corpo’s – there’s still loads of them around with much finer examples than the above.

    Just thinking actually I spotted pretty good steel reproductions last week and Im nearly sure it was on the Crumlin Road somewhere – ill get on the case tomorrow!

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 38 total)

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