Wind farms and the landscape

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    • #709522
      ake
      Participant

      (is there already a thread for this? Couldn’t find it.)
      Some ONSHORE as opposed to offshore windmills in South Wexford, a couple of km from the coast.
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      Are these a welcome addition to the landscape? Or are they no more attractive than motorways or power plants?

      Personally I do not like them at all and want to see all wind farms offshore.

    • #790897
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I’m never sure what to make about wind farms. They do provide clean, renewable energy, but they play havoc with bird life.

      Sometimes I wonder just whether a wind farm has more of an overall negative environmental impact than a non-renewable source πŸ™

    • #790898
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @THE_Chris wrote:

      I’m never sure what to make about wind farms. They do provide clean, renewable energy, but they play havoc with bird life.

      Sometimes I wonder just whether a wind farm has more of an overall negative environmental impact than a non-renewable source πŸ™

      Have you ever seen how an oil spill effects bird life? I am not at all worried about peat stations, i grew up near one on the Shannon. However these are non-renewable sources of energy. Do people really miss the point sometimes? Unless we can invent more perpetual sources of energy soon we will all be walking around again and burning candles, how do you think our voracious energy needs are at all sustainable? They are not, fact.
      A lot of people say turbines are noisy. Weeell, i live in a city street and i think cars and motorbikes are way too flipping noisy, and let’s not talk about planes and helicopters over the city. You ever sit in your garden and listen to them? Mmm peaceful. Some of us actually would like to avail of public transport than take the car. I have never seen the like of such car-dependency than i have in Dublin (I lived in various cities abroad) It’s a national disgrace and the politicians do NOTHING to tackle it.
      As for the turbines, offshore is much more desierable but i have seen these turbines in areas of very low population density, such as north Leitrim and i think this makes more sense. Build there and build many, i say.

    • #790899
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Do people really miss the point sometimes? Unless we can invent more perpetual sources of energy soon we will all be walking around again and burning candles, how do you think our voracious energy needs are at all sustainable? They are not, fact.

      Personally, I’m not too worried about energy needs as fusion power will be around in ~50 years time and there’ll be no more energy problems as it just uses seawater. πŸ˜€

    • #790900
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I thought Fusion was only being researched, but hey we can always dismantle these turbines if Fusion power (trademark of Gillette) comes to the fore eh? πŸ˜€

    • #790901
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @THE_Chris wrote:

      I’m never sure what to make about wind farms. They do provide clean, renewable energy, but they play havoc with bird life.

      Sometimes I wonder just whether a wind farm has more of an overall negative environmental impact than a non-renewable source πŸ™

      No need to wonder about that. Wind farms have a miniscule impact on the environment, compared to almost all other sources of energy, they are invisible. I don’t think that’s disputed.

      The only small problem is the one you mentioned, birdlife and much more so apparently, bat life. However this seems only to affect birds of prey. There may be solutions to this problem. If not, it will be a shame, but we’ll make do with out them.

      The newer turbines don’t have a noise problem. And even if they did, as it was said, nobody’s talking about getting rid of cars or airplanes.

    • #790902
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @Keen wrote:

      As for the turbines, offshore is much more desierable but i have seen these turbines in areas of very low population density, such as north Leitrim and i think this makes more sense. Build there and build many, i say.

      I say just make the larger investment, put them all offshore where they produce much more energy and give a greater return in the long run and leave beautiful north Leitrim unspoiled.

      Of course this isn’t happening, almost all of the 30 or so windfarms in Ireland are onshore (just like almost all forest is ugly sitka wasteland). Smallest investment, quickest return. Nothing else is considered.

    • #790903
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Putting wind farms (or anything else for that matter) offshore is great in theory. The only problem is that it renders it uneconomic, and the net result is that they will not be developed. The Arklow bank wind farm has proven to be very costly, with maintenance costs much higher than land-based equivalents and in-service time is much lower. The wind farm off the coast of Denmark has also proven very costly and the developers have since scaled back its expansion. We should be trying to encourage wind farms as much as possible, and with reasonable planning and site location all parties should gain. Incidentally, I recall an experimental wind turbine in Cape Clear (off the coast of Cork) back in the late 80’s. It was part of a research project by a German manufacturer and was later removed.

    • #790904
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @corcaighboy wrote:

      Putting wind farms (or anything else for that matter) offshore is great in theory. The only problem is that it renders it uneconomic, and the net result is that they will not be developed. The Arklow bank wind farm has proven to be very costly, with maintenance costs much higher than land-based equivalents and in-service time is much lower. The wind farm off the coast of Denmark has also proven very costly and the developers have since scaled back its expansion. We should be trying to encourage wind farms as much as possible, and with reasonable planning and site location all parties should gain. Incidentally, I recall an experimental wind turbine in Cape Clear (off the coast of Cork) back in the late 80’s. It was part of a research project by a German manufacturer and was later removed.

      Was up in Arklow recently and out by bank. Costly indeed to maintain with a special purpose (shallow draft and jet prop due bank shallows) vessel carrying out personnel each day to do maintenance. Plus larger tug/platform type vessels bring out everything from spares, scaffolding, paint.
      Combine these extra costs plus the weather, in the 3 days I was there in our so called summer, they lost two days due to rough seas when maintenance personnel could not be landed.
      Offshore all fine and well if we the punters paying for power….are willing to pay for it….
      It is good of course that employment has come to the seafaring community of Arklow in times when their fishing is practically nil but as I say…. it all comes at a cost…… for you and I

    • #790905
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @corcaighboy wrote:

      Putting wind farms (or anything else for that matter) offshore is great in theory. The only problem is that it renders it uneconomic, and the net result is that they will not be developed.

      Renders it slightly less economic in the short term. That’s ‘not uneconomic’.

    • #790906
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      If you don’t like how wind farms look, would you prefer a Nuclear Powerplant instead? Our electrical needs are ever increasing and at almost the same rate as the fossil fuels we rely on for our electricity is becoming more scarce. Big decisions must be made. We either tolerate the constant hum of the wind generating towers, or get used to the idea of Nuclear energy.

      The only other option is to reduce our electricity consumption.

    • #790907
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @corcaighboy wrote:

      Putting wind farms (or anything else for that matter) offshore is great in theory. The only problem is that it renders it uneconomic, and the net result is that they will not be developed. The Arklow bank wind farm has proven to be very costly, with maintenance costs much higher than land-based equivalents and in-service time is much lower. The wind farm off the coast of Denmark has also proven very costly and the developers have since scaled back its expansion. We should be trying to encourage wind farms as much as possible, and with reasonable planning and site location all parties should gain. Incidentally, I recall an experimental wind turbine in Cape Clear (off the coast of Cork) back in the late 80’s. It was part of a research project by a German manufacturer and was later removed.

      Twas removed when the ESB ran a cable from the mainland.
      Decent article here http://www.oileain.ie/en/ComhdhailWork/NationalWork/RenewableEnergy/

    • #790908
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @THE_Chris wrote:

      Personally, I’m not too worried about energy needs as fusion power will be around in ~50 years time and there’ll be no more energy problems as it just uses seawater. πŸ˜€

      Fusion may never actually happen. the problem exists that too many neutrons are given off from water which cause the reactor to desintegrate, making the whole thing highly unviable. The thing could be done using an isotope of helium called helium 3, however, we must go to the moon to mine it.

      A possible future source of Irelands energy could come from wave energy. There’s an experiment running in Galway bay at the moment using one of the most advanced wave turbines in the world. It’s a quarter sized prototype. Given that we have one of the most restless coasts in the world, we could generate a lot of energy from it, and become world leaders in the field.

    • #790909
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @PTB wrote:

      Fusion may never actually happen. the problem exists that too many neutrons are given off from water which cause the reactor to desintegrate, making the whole thing highly unviable. The thing could be done using an isotope of helium called helium 3, however, we must go to the moon to mine it.

      A possible future source of Irelands energy could come from wave energy. There’s an experiment running in Galway bay at the moment using one of the most advanced wave turbines in the world. It’s a quarter sized prototype. Given that we have one of the most restless coasts in the world, we could generate a lot of energy from it, and become world leaders in the field.

      Link to the Galway wave energy : http://www.marine.ie/home/aboutus/organisationstaff/researchfacilities/Ocean+Energy+Test+Site.htm

    • #790910
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Theres also a Dublin company that claim to have built a turbine utilising magnets, which actually creates more energy than is put in. Understandably no scientists have taken up their offer to let them study it as it voilates a fundamental law of energy that says that any movement results in a net loss in energy, or something to that effect (Leaving cert physics is two months behind me now), and pretty much every other law of physics. Personally I thing these ‘scientists’ may have been hitting the whiskey too hard.

      My 200th post. I feel all growed up.

    • #790911
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @PTB wrote:

      Theres also a Dublin company that claim to have built a turbine utilising magnets, which actually creates more energy than is put in. Understandably no scientists have taken up their offer to let them study it as it voilates a fundamental law of energy that says that any movement results in a net loss in energy, or something to that effect (Leaving cert physics is two months behind me now), and pretty much every other law of physics. Personally I thing these ‘scientists’ may have been hitting the whiskey too hard.

      My 200th post. I feel all growed up.

      http://www.steorn.net/

      the juries still out on this one…. its a HUGE cliam to be able to produce free energy….. but so was splitting the atom…

    • #790912
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @henno wrote:

      http://www.steorn.net/its a HUGE cliam to be able to produce free energy….. but so was splitting the atom…

      Yeah, a lot of people thought that Einsteins relativity throry was a load of rubbish when it first came out. Perhaps I shouldn’t be so quick to judge.

      If this technology is for real, it could change the world all around us. Imagine. Free energy I’ll just put that in bold for effect. Free energy

      Curiously, it was Ernest Walton,an Irishman, who built the first particle accelerator along with John Cockcroft

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