Tallest Building in Ireland?

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    • #707726
      DubGuy22
      Participant

      Which building is taller – Liberty Hall in Dublin or the County Hall in Cork?
      Getting conflicting answers online.

    • #751993
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      Cork County Hall

    • #751994
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Liberty Hall was the tallest until Cork County Hall was constructed a few years later.
      I dont know why people think that Liberty Hall is taller. I’ve asked Family and friends the same question and each one says it’s Liberty Hall ???

    • #751995
      sw101
      Participant

      it’s more slender, therefore appears taller i s’pose.

    • #751996
      GrahamH
      Participant

      And people just can’t accept the fact that Cork has a taller building than Dublin.
      Also Liberty Hall was the first so the myth kinda got grounded – esp as it was still considered the tallest in the world in some quarters til 1996 ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #751997
      jackwade
      Participant

      There are of course a number of buildings proposed that are taller than both Liberty Hall and Cork County Hall, and here they are.
      [HTML] Building Status Floors Height Type
      1. The proposed Cherry Orchard Tower proposed 40 unknown residential
      2. Heuston Gate approved 32 117.7m residential, bar/restaurant
      (under appeal)
      3. That Barrow st. monstrosity proposed 32 unknown residential
      4. Player’s Square Tower planning refused 28 86 m residential
      (likely to re-apply)
      5.City Quay Development proposed 28 unknown residential, bar/restuarant/niteclub
      6. U2 Tower approved 25 78m office?residential? recording studio
      (unlikely to go ahead as originally planned)
      7. MJ Flood site, Sandyford proposed 23 unknown residential
      Industrial Estate
      8. Merchant’s Gate proposed 19 unknown office?
      9.City Quay Development proposed 17 unknown office
      10. The Park, Carrickmines approved 16 71m office, apart-hotel?
      11. Monte Vetro under construction 18 unknown residential
      12.Alto Vetro (formerly Quay Lodge) under construction 16 unknown residential
      13. Santry Cross under construction 16 unknown residential
      14. Tara st. Station approved 14?16? don’t know, office, restaurant
      (Is it still going ahead?) but it was taller than Liberty Hall[/HTML]

      For the record, Liberty Hall has 16 floors (including the top, maintenance floor) and is 59.4m tall. Can someone please tell me the height of Cork County Hall? I don’t know it off the top of my head.
      Oops, I forgot to include the Eglington Street Tower and Water Street project proposed for Cork in the list above. The Eglington Street Tower will be 25 floors if it gets the go ahead, which I assume would be taller than County Hall. The tower element of Water Street would be a 17 floor residential which I imagine would be slightly shorter than C.C.H.
      Feel free to offer your corrections to the above list. ๐Ÿ™‚
      Apologies for the extremely messy post, its late, i’m tired and I can’t figure out the damn list thing ๐Ÿ˜€

    • #751998
      Anonymous
      Participant

      i thought liberty hall had 17 storeys including the observation deck. by the way what is that green piece of lego on top? as for cork county hall i think it is 64m tall. the tallest building at present for the whole country is windsor house belfast at 80m.

    • #751999
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster
    • #752000
      lexington
      Participant

      @jackwade wrote:

      There are of course a number of buildings proposed that are taller than both Liberty Hall and Cork County Hall, and here they are.
      [HTML] Building Status Floors Height Type
      1. The proposed Cherry Orchard Tower proposed 40 unknown residential
      2. Heuston Gate approved 32 117.7m residential, bar/restaurant
      (under appeal)
      3. That Barrow st. monstrosity proposed 32 unknown residential
      4. Player’s Square Tower planning refused 28 86 m residential
      (likely to re-apply)
      5.City Quay Development proposed 28 unknown residential, bar/restuarant/niteclub
      6. U2 Tower approved 25 78m office?residential? recording studio
      (unlikely to go ahead as originally planned)
      7. MJ Flood site, Sandyford proposed 23 unknown residential
      Industrial Estate
      8. Merchant’s Gate proposed 19 unknown office?
      9.City Quay Development proposed 17 unknown office
      10. The Park, Carrickmines approved 16 71m office, apart-hotel?
      11. Monte Vetro under construction 18 unknown residential
      12.Alto Vetro (formerly Quay Lodge) under construction 16 unknown residential
      13. Santry Cross under construction 16 unknown residential
      14. Tara st. Station approved 14?16? don’t know, office, restaurant
      (Is it still going ahead?) but it was taller than Liberty Hall[/HTML]

      For the record, Liberty Hall has 16 floors (including the top, maintenance floor) and is 59.4m tall. Can someone please tell me the height of Cork County Hall? I don’t know it off the top of my head.
      Oops, I forgot to include the Eglington Street Tower and Water Street project proposed for Cork in the list above. The Eglington Street Tower will be 25 floors if it gets the go ahead, which I assume would be taller than County Hall. The tower element of Water Street would be a 17 floor residential which I imagine would be slightly shorter than C.C.H.
      Feel free to offer your corrections to the above list. ๐Ÿ™‚
      Apologies for the extremely messy post, its late, i’m tired and I can’t figure out the damn list thing ๐Ÿ˜€

      Cork Figures:
      Under Construction or In Planning
      Cork County Hall = 66m (67m after redevelopment) @ 16 storeys
      Eglinton Street = 70m @ 17-storeys (80m including the spire)
      Water Street = 58m @ 17-storeys

      [There are 4 other significant high-rise buildings under consideration and/or pre-planning for Cork – 2 of which rise higher than both Eglinton Street and County Hall (I think their fate will have a lot to do with Eglinton and Water Street outcomes, which seem to have more problems with parking than height(!) ~ which in some ways is a relief!) The other 2 are planned for Clontarf Street and Blackpool respectively.]

    • #752001
      Boyler
      Participant

      With all this tall buildings being considered to be built, won’t Cork and Dublin look like American cities if they are allowed to be constructed?

    • #752002
      lexington
      Participant

      @Boyler wrote:

      With all this tall buildings being considered to be built, won’t Cork and Dublin look like American cities if they are allowed to be constructed?

      Well you’re enthusuatic I’ll give you that ]a.[/B] the loss of greenery/countryside to urban development b. the rising population and c. the cost of land.

      However, in Dublin, with the exception of the flutey Grand Canal report on high-rise, Dublin doesn’t have any clear-cut defined policy which is shared between the 3 councils on high-rise developments. In part result, we are seen tall structures highly dispersed and incoherrent in places such as Sandyford, Cherry Orchard, Blanchardstown, Tallaght etc etc. In the interests of proper planning, I do believe that highrise developments are important, but need to be centralised or focus on a particular area or areas – such as the docklands. In this way, one manages to protect vulnerable areas to gross overdevelopment and provide at the same time, an aesthetic merit to the layout and order of the city. The 26-storey tower for Donnybrook for example was a disastrous location for such a tall-structure. But, hand-in-hand with the development of high-rise, a strong emphasis must be placed on aesthetics and design quality – and how that will lend itself to a designated area. Treasury’s Barrow Street development, by Tony Reddy & Co., although in the docklands area (which is positive) is quite frankly a brutally ugly attempt at design and contributes zilch to the Dublin skyline.

      In Cork, I believe high-rise will be ever neccessary in the coming years as the green outskirts and countryside recreation areas are swallowed by on-going development. I would rather see high-rise concentrated within the city in an effort to protect the small and ever-dimishing city greenspace. Fortunately, Cork City Council have designated areas for such development, that is, along and around the Docklands, and at the 4 city ‘Gateways’ (Victoria Cross to the West, Tivoli to the East, Eglinton Street to the South and Blackpool to the North). The existing city centre is a protected low-rise area with ceilings of 9-storeys imposed. There is no restrictions on height for docklands high-rise in Cork as projects will be judged on merit, however, the desired height otherwise is around 6-storeys.

    • #752003
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Lexington, has high-rise even been an issue in Cork?
      Has the solution (if it can be described as such) to the Dublin battle that’s taken place over the decades, been neatly applied to Cork just as it begins to take off?
      That is, allow it in designated areas and otherwise forget it? Not that that’s exactly happening in Dublin – but it is interesting that tall buildings elsewhere in Ireland are causing little to no controversy at all.

      Is everyone just fed up at this stage and are just saying ah sure let them at it, or is it an acceptance that tall buildings anywhere can be acceptable as long as they’re clumped together or are used independently as ‘landmarks’? Or is this just a passing fad and will public opinion swing back aagin in 5-10 years I wonder?

      On Liberty Hall, does the height include the plant on top of the frilly roof? That’s always been a question, think Andrew Duffy asked it before but no one knew…

    • #752004
      lexington
      Participant

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      Lexington, has high-rise even been an issue in Cork?
      Has the solution (if it can be described as such) to the Dublin battle that’s taken place over the decades, been neatly applied to Cork just as it begins to take off?
      That is, allow it in designated areas and otherwise forget it? Not that that’s exactly happening in Dublin – but it is interesting that tall buildings elsewhere in Ireland are causing little to no controversy at all.

      Is everyone just fed up at this stage and are just saying ah sure let them at it, or is it an acceptance that tall buildings anywhere can be acceptable as long as they’re clumped together or are used independently as ‘landmarks’? Or is this just a passing fad and will public opinion swing back aagin in 5-10 years I wonder?

      Cork’s high-rise record isn’t an enviable one – i.e. Cork County Hall, Victoria Mills etc. And generally, the local public have held a certain disdain toward the notion, however, when the original Cork City Docklands Development Plan was formulated (even as far back as 1998), Cork City Council noted (and perhaps in part recognition to the voices of many high-rise lobbyists which accused the council of being Anti High-rise) that it was not oppose to the development of high-rise buildings in locations which high-rise structures already exist – specifically, the Cork Docklands (thanks to structures like R&H Hall) was mentioned. Further to this, it was noted that this waterfont area offered a unique opportunity to develop visual and architectural landmarks to an area so long neglected.

      Later, in the Cork City Development Plan 2003 (amended 2004), it was noted that further areas such as Victoria Cross (home to Cork County Hall), Tivoli, Blackpool and Eglinton Street (all designated Cork City ‘Gateways’ could stand to benefit from at least one landmark, tall building each (more in Victoria Cross’ case). This Gateway approach is in the interests of architectural and planning balance. The city centre (the current city centre) is protected with a ceiling of 9-storeys). I think the people of Cork seemed to recognise, that areas like the docklands, which possess such tall structures would be hollow without them and a few more wasn’t really going to take away from what is there. You also have to remember Cork city is actually well in breach of its so-called ‘City Limits’ – over 175,000 people live in ‘city’ areas/suburbs that are not officially recognised by Cork County Council (or maps!!!) as being part of the city. The growth is eating away at the countryside. In order to encourage continued city centre development, planners recognised that, without being able to build out, they’d have to build up.

      Consequently developers jumped at the chance to take advantage of this new policy – allowing them maximise their development potential and capacity on smaller areas of land which had been previously bounded by restriction. Initially in 1999 it was CIE that investigated developing a number of tall buildings for their Horgan’s Quay Urban Masterplan in conjunction with Manor Park Homes (but this is not due til 2007), a few years later Werdna proposed Water Street, O’Callaghan Properties with Jurys, then O’Flynn Construction with Eglinton Street and there are at least 5 other high-rise plans in the pipeline. 2 for the docklands are in exc ess of 20-storeys. In planning, the biggest problems faced by these high-rises has been density (Water Street) and parking facilities (Eglinton Street). The design standards have been very high, allaying many previous held fears about ‘ugly’ buildings. The designs for the planned high-rises are also of a very high-standard. I think what is happening in Cork is also a consequence of the economic conditions and associated confidence which is part of an overall national trend. Yes there are some difficult people who remain utterly adverse to the concept, but the fact is, more and more, it will become necessary.

    • #752005
      Rockflanders
      Participant

      Well done Jack Wade for table. Handy to see all future buildings laid out like that. For the record, Merchant’s Gate is 64m and is a hotel and residential.

    • #752006
      Andrew Duffy
      Participant

      Liberty Hall is 59.4m from ground level to the roof of the observation level; the plant room on the top is 63.4m above seal level.

      – The 32 story building on Barrow St. will be 108.25m above ground.
      – The City Quay proposal seems to exist only on Shay Cleary’s website; if you know more I’d love to hear it.
      – The U2 Landmark tower was never 25 stories, it was 19 or 20 depending on how the ground floor was configured. It may well be 25 stories when planning is applied for, however.
      – Thanks for the info on Merchant’s Gate
      – Santry Cross is 52m above ground
      – Tara St. Station will be 15 stories and 60.8m above ground; it will reach 63.3m above sea level which is lower than Liberty Hall.

      Also:

      – Gannon Homes has an application in for Balgriffin (6249/04) with residential buildings of 19 and 15 stories
      – Green Property has an application in for a 17 storey, 60.8m hotel in Blanchardstown (F04A/1799)
      – Glencairn Developments has a 17 storey proposal (D04A/1115) for the Murphystown Road
      – The Airport City Partnership has applied for a 16 storey hotel in Clonshaugh (F04A/1684)
      – Florence Property & Chanterwork Property have applied for a 15 storey hotel in Clancy Barracks (6113/04, 6114/04)
      – Stillorgan Enterprises Ltd. has applied for a 15 storey building on the site of the Leisureplex (D04A/1254)

    • #752007
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Thanks for your reply Lexington – and for that definitive Liberty Hall answer Andrew :), although is the plant section really 4m in height, or is there a difference between the building height you quoted and the sea level height?

      @lexington wrote:

      developers jumped at the chance to take advantage of this new policy – allowing them maximise their development potential

      That’s certainly one way of putting the making of vast profits yes ๐Ÿ™‚

      It’s interesting that high-rise is slipping into city development plans almost unnoticed – of course yes, high-rise Irish style, but it certainly reflects a growing acceptance of the form, something that perhaps was taboo even 10 years ago.
      As is ever so slightly evident, I’m utterly ignorant of Cork…amongst other things….but what was it’s tallest commercial/office building prior to the recent boom?
      Any pictures too would be good – thanks.

    • #752008
      jackwade
      Participant

      Thanks to everyone for their comments and corrections

      The City Quay proposal seems to exist only on Shay Cleary’s website; if you know more I’d love to hear it

      Nope, I only know what I read on this site. Sorry.

      The U2 Landmark tower was never 25 stories, it was 19 or 20 depending on how the ground floor was configured. It may well be 25 stories when planning is applied for, however.

      I read 25 somewhere, unfortunately can’t remember now. Didn’t think that could be right as it wouldn’t correspond with the overall height of 78m.

      Tara St. Station will be 15 stories and 60.8m above ground; it will reach 63.3m above sea level which is lower than Liberty Hall.

      Read an Evening Herald aticle which claimed it would be taller. Maybe they were referring to the older proposal. It was reduced by 2 floors if i’m right?

      Lexington, thanks for the Cork figures esp. Eglinton street. Think I had the number 25 stuck in my head for some reason.

      I listed the Cherry Orchard Tower as residential, but thats just my assumption. Is this a serious proposal? I can’t really see it getting the go ahead. A Trojan for a shorter tower perhaps? Would love to see a pic of the project.

      Andew Duffy, do you know if the Leisureplex will be demolished to make way for the Stillorgan tower? Surely if thats the plan, it will be replaced? :confused:

    • #752009
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      Docks tower could rise higher
      Archiseek / Ireland / News / 2005 / February 7
      The Irish Times

      The Dublin Docklands Development Authority wants to raise the height of the proposed U2 tower to 100 metres, only 20 metres lower than the Spire. The docklands authority is involved in talks with Mr Liam Carroll, the city’s most prolific developer, on the building of the twisting tower of apartments planned for a site at Britain Quay at the mouth of the River Dodder. A competition for the tower was jointly sponsored in 2003 by the authority and U2, whose new recording studio is to be on top of it. This will replace their old studios in a warehouse on Hanover Quay, which is to be demolished. The tower was to be 60 metres high but its height would be raised by 40 metres under an amended planning scheme for the Grand Canal Docks area.

      http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/ireland/2005/0207/542696599HM3U2.html

    • #752010
      Andrew Duffy
      Participant

      is the plant section really 4m in height

      No; I don’t know the height above ground for the plany room. The AOD height was in the Tara St. Station appeal report.

      do you know if the Leisureplex will be demolished to make way for the Stillorgan tower?

      Yes, and it will be rebuilt:

      For a mixed use development on a site comprising the Stillorgan Bowl Leisureplex No.’s 62-79 St. Laurence’s Park, the existing Stillorgan Public Library and adjoining Council owned land, which is the subject of a sale agreement with Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council and also an ancillary area of Council owned land where environmental improvement works and traffic management works are proposed. The subject site comprises 1.59 hectares bounded by St. Laurence’s Park to the North, Lower Kilmacud Road to the South, N11 Stillorgan Road to the East and Old Dublin Road to the West.

      The proposed development involves the demolition of all existing structures on the site including the Leisureplex building Dun Laoghaire Rathtdown County Council temporary library building, No. 62 and 63 St. Laurence’s Park and 16 two-storey Local Authority maisonette units at No. 64-79 St. Laurence’s Park.

      The proposed development is a mixed-use scheme comprising a total of 314 No. residential units (82 no. 1-bed, 199 no. 2-bed and 33 no. 3-bed and includes 40 no. social housing units and 8 no. live/work units); approx 2,238 sq.m. gross floor area retail; approx. 3,938 sq.m. gross floor area offices; approx. 3,719 sq.m. gross floor area (indoor) leisure/recreational facilities (Class 11(e) use); approx. 486 sq.m. gross floor area crรƒยจche; approx. 1,019 sq.m. gross floor area new public library and ancillary car parking with associated landscaping and site development works. The overall development will consist of approx. 40,349 sq.m. gross floor area overall in 15 No. mixed use blocks (Blocks A,B,C, D, E, F, G, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P) as follows:-

      Block A : 5-storey over double basement – comprising c.2,091 sq.m. double height leisure/recreational facility (Class 11(e) use) at basement level c. 792 sq.m. retail at ground floor level and 4 No. office units with combined gross floor area c. 3,938 sq.m. over four floors above.

      Blocks B, C, D, E & F : 7 storey over double basement comprising c. 1,628 sq.m. leisure/recreational facility (Class 11(e) use) at upper basement level, 5 No. retail units at ground floor level (combined gross floor area c. 1,183 sq.m.) with 80 No. apartments in total over four upper floors plus two additional levels of setback penthouses: each block comprising 16 No. apartments in the form of 5 No. 1-bed units, 10 No. 2-bed units and 1 No. 3-bed setback detached penthouse unit.

      Block G : 6/8 storey atrium building – comprising c. 1,019 sq.m. public library at upper ground floor level, 71 No. apartments comprising 6 No. 2-bed duplex units at lower ground floor level and 65 No. units from lower ground floor to sixth floor level in the form of 19 No. 1-bed duplex units, 1 No. 2-bed unit, 44 No. 2 bed duplex units and 1 No. 3-bed duplex unit.

      Block I : 15- storey corner building (at junction of Lower Kilmacud Road and N11 Stillorgan Road) comprising c. 263 sq.m. ground floor (part double height) retail and 34 No. units which includes 1 No. ground floor 2 – bed duplex live/work unit and 33 No. apartments over thirteen floors comprising 30 No. 2-bed units and 3 No. 3-bed setback duplex penthouses.

      Blocks J, K and L : 8 – storey comprising 51 No. units which includes 6 No. 2-bed live/work duplex units over ground and first floor level and 45 No. apartments over four upper floors plus two additional levels of setback penthouses, in the form of 12 No. 1-bed units, 18 No. 2-bed units, 6 No. 3-bed units, 6 No. 3-bed setback penthouses and 3 No. 3-bed setback detached penthouses.

      Block M : 7 storey – comprising 15 No. units which includes 1 No. 2 bed live/work duplex unit over ground and first floor level and 14 No. apartments over four upper floors plus one additional level with setback penthouse, in the form of 4 No. 1-bed units, 7 no. 2-bed units, 2 No. 3-bed units and 1 No. 3-bed setback detached penthouse.

      Blocks N & O: 7 – storey and 6 – storey respectively – comprising c. 486 sq.m. gross floor area crรƒยจche across ground floor level and 29 No. apartments over upper floors comprising 8 No. 1-bed units, 16 No. 2 – bed units and 4 No. 3 – bed units over five upper floors and 1 No. 3-bed setback detached penthouse on Block N.

      Block P : 3-storey social housing – comprising 34 No. apartments in three separate blocks in the form of 14 No. 1-bed apartments and 2 No. 2-bed apartments at ground floor level and 17 No. 2 bed duplex units and 1 No. 3 – bed duplex unit over first and second floors.

      The proposed development includes a total of 528 No. car parking spaces with 478 No. car parking spaces and bin storage facilities over two basement levels, 23 No. car parking spaces in service yard and 27 No. surface car parking spaces; 360 No. bicycle parking spaces at basement and surface levels; service yard to the rear of Block A at upper ground floor level and service yard to rear of Blocks B-D at lower ground floor level; children’s play area; landscaping works across the site including hard and soft landscaping and tree planting and new boundary treatment along the Lower Kilmacud Road and N11 Stillorgan Road: all associated site development works including a single storey ESB substation and security building (c. 23 sq.m.) in the northeast corner of the site, a second ESB substation at ground floor level in Block N and a new roundabout junction at St. Laurence’s Park to facilitate vehicular access to the site.

      Vehicular access to the development will be via the existing entrance points at the Dublin Road and St. Laurence’s Park with additional access to the social housing in Block P (34 No. units) and Block G (6 no. units) at St. Laurence’s Park. Pedestrian access to the site will be via a gated access at street level along the Lower Kilmacud Road and two points along St. Laurence’s Park.

      An Environmental Impact Statement will be submitted to the Planning Authority with the Planning Application.

    • #752011
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Stillorgan could have a pretty interesting skyline if the above project clears appeal and if this one below clears the appeals process as well

      http://www.murrayolaoire.com/news_04/04_01_28/blakes_planning.html

    • #752012
      geraghtyg
      Participant

      I think a nice cluster of decent height “sky-scrapers” would give Dublin a fantastic visual impact, especially when driving from out side the city to the city itself. I know that if I am driving into Dublin on the M1, I can see the ESB chimney stacks at Poolbeg as soon as I get over the hills near Balbriggan. However, if there was an area of decent sized skyscarpers ( not neccessarily that tall, maybe 30 – 50 or 60 stories) in Dublin city, the view driving towards the city would be absolutely amazing IMO as you get closer and closer to the city. I feel it would give myself and others a feeling of knowing where the city centre area is rather than using the chimney stacks as your landmark for Dublin and perhaps The Spire when you get closer and have a good eye. I would feel I would be getting closer to a modern, well developed city rather than a low rise, drab, sprawling “town” – A city that actually looks like a city. The drive from my home on the northside to the city via the coast road is nice with mountains in the distance. The port area and the chimney stacks are the only real land marks. Until the Spire went up, my notion of where the city centre is (O’Connell St) was totally different to where I now know it to be, when driving to the city on the coast road. Now a nest of skyscrapers in the city or the docklands with the Dublin mountains in the background would make a fantastic vista. In a decade or so, I could picture myself lying in the sun on Dollymount beach (thanks to global warming ๐Ÿ™‚ ) with 50 story skyscapers about a mile or 2 away. What a strange sight that would be. Or would it? We already have the chimney stacks which are huge and not that easy on the eye and yet nobody seems to have a problem with these. Anyone know what the height of the stacks are equivalent to number of stories, rather than in metres or feet?
      Graham

    • #752013
      burge_eye
      Participant

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      And people just can’t accept the fact that Cork has a taller building than Dublin.
      Also Liberty Hall was the first so the myth kinda got grounded – esp as it was still considered the tallest in the world in some quarters til 1996 ๐Ÿ™‚

      I could be mistaken but isn’t the spire of Cork’s St. Fin Barre’s cathedral taller than County Hall?

    • #752014
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      there are a few spires around the country of 180ft

    • #752015
      Andrew Duffy
      Participant

      The Poolbeg chimney stacks are 207m tall; that would fit 45-50 office floors or 60-65 residential floors.

    • #752016
      geraghtyg
      Participant

      Now a dozen or so buildings around the same height of the Poolbeg chimney stacks really would look the biz down in the docklands and would also take ones eyes from the chimneys stacks as they are quite ugly, IMO. Some tastefully designed skyscrapers along with the standard glass clad type sky-scrapers would suit the area so well. In fact, they could maybe even help the chimneys blend in a little with their surroundings. And as I drive down the coast road to work and see this proper city skyline, I know I’m driving through a prosperous and developing city – Developing upwards instead of outwards.

    • #752017
      geraghtyg
      Participant

      Now a dozen or so buildings around the same height of the Poolbeg chimney stacks really would look the biz down in the docklands and would also take ones eyes from the chimneys stacks as they are quite ugly, IMO. Some tastefully designed skyscrapers along with the standard glass clad type sky-scrapers would suit the area so well. In fact, they could maybe even help the chimneys blend in a little with their surroundings. And as I drive down the coast road to work and see this proper city skyline, I know I’m driving through a prosperous and developing city – Developing upwards instead of outwards.

    • #752018
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      Tne Poolbeg chimneys are as much a symbol of the city as anything else you can think of. Coming in over the city on a plane and spotting them, is when you know you’re home. Long may they stand.

    • #752019
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      agreed…..

    • #752020
      geraghtyg
      Participant

      That’s exactly my point. The chimney stacks are all we have to show in our skyline. And while I’d admit it would make a huge difference to the Dublin skyline if the chimneys were removed (and I would kinda miss them deep down), it’s a pity that our skyline is 2 big chimneys and a big pointy spike – BTW I do love the Spire ๐Ÿ˜‰ Whilst flying into most medium to large developed cities around the world, the first thing that strikes you is the skyscrapers. When I flew into Perth, Australia a few years ago, the view of the city skyline was amazing. And when flying into Toronto, the view was equally spectacular. The plane was nearly on the ground before I even noticed the CN Tower, simply because my eye was drawn to the huge cluster of 50-60 story buildings. Even from the plane, I could tell that I was arriving in a modern and thriving city just from the style and architecture of the buildings. If I was arriving into Dublin by plane for my first time and all I could see was 2 big chimney stacks and a huge low-rise urban sprawl, I reckon I’d assume it’s a fairly non-developed non-descirpt large town.

    • #752021
      asdasd
      Participant

      We had – and have – a perfect opportunity to redevelop the skyline at the Grand Canal docks and Spencer Dock. While some of the stuff being built out there looks interesting enough, most of it seems to lack – with the possible future exception of the U2 tower, any real height. Quite a lost opportuinity, this was an area of the city where the liffey is quite wide. Now as I come into the City on the South Bound Dart i see a lot of tall Cranes. I think when everything is finished I may well miss the cranes, which add a temporary skyline to the city, and the stuff left behind is not at tall, and will not catch the eye.

    • #752022
      GrahamH
      Participant

      I wouldn’t agree geraghtyg that a city needs tall buildings to look like a city – or rather, what we percieve a western city to look like – but I do agree that Dublin’s Docklands needs definition.
      Most certainly not of the Spencer Dock Attempt 1 variety (to think that would be being topped out around now had it progressed ๐Ÿ˜ฎ ), but development of a decidedly more well-planned and aesthetically pleasing nature.

      Exactly what form this should take in real terms is along the lines of that DDDA article in the other tall thread; mid-rise 10ish storeys punctuated with the odd 25-30 storey building for interest.

      I suppose the greatest fear that conservationists have now on the high-rise issue – if it’s even an issue anymore – is not so much the height, but the architecture. High-rise modern buildings will make Dublin just like everywhere else – high-quality or not. It’s just the nature of contemporary design and development – I suppose we ought to see at as an opportunity rather than anything else to progress contemporary design – but as a concession I would like to see the existing city centre skyline being given a definition of its own by being kept as it is, which I cannot see happening.
      A comparitively low-rise skyline is just as important as one puctuated with towers; it equally as worthy and equally as distinctive.

    • #752023
      Rory W
      Participant

      Nice list jackwade, but missing from the list was the proposed 27 storey apartment tower for Drogheda – planning permission has gone in for it and I think its about 80m and should hit No 6 on your list

    • #752024
      aj
      Participant

      Does anyone know the state on play on at the minute on the Tara St tower , has someone in CIE forgot they where suppossed to be getting it built around now? :confused:

    • #752025
      john bedford
      Participant

      does any1 know how tall the Cherry Orchard Redevelopment will b? 40 stories is a little big for dublin isnt it?

    • #752026
      lexington
      Participant

      @aj wrote:

      Does anyone know the state on play on at the minute on the Tara St tower , has someone in CIE forgot they where suppossed to be getting it built around now? :confused:

      They’ve been ‘forgetting’ for 7 years to build Horgan’s Quay in Cork.

    • #752027
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @john bedford wrote:

      does any1 know how tall the Cherry Orchard Redevelopment will b? 40 stories is a little big for dublin isnt it?

      Not necessarily as its location is entirely new build and is a single element in a much larger masterplan in an area bordering Industrial and low density residential. To give the scheme profile it will be necessary to build a tall building given its currently remote location. Now whether a developer can be found to pay for a 40 storey apartment block in Dublin 10 remains to be seen.

    • #752028
      PTB
      Participant

      @lexington wrote:

      They’ve been ‘forgetting’ for 7 years to build Horgan’s Quay in Cork.

      It can only be down to alzihmers at this stage!

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