Parkitecture

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    • #707911
      lexington
      Participant

      Cork City Council have begun seeking suitable tenders to surface over the Kinsale Road Landfill site – it is believed that the site may now provie the city with a new urban amenity space in the years to come with playgrounds, ponds, wooded walkways and so on.

      As vital elements of any successful urban environment, parks and amenity green-spaces can often provide a lone link to a temporary removal of metropolitan madness. Especially city centre residents. But what makes a good park? The successful art of amenity green-spaces is no mean feat. More and more, planners and public officials are utilising establish and/or innovative design firms to develop a delicate yet attractive landscape in large urban locations.

      I notice a section in Unbuilt Ireland regarding a competition design for a new community amenity park – what are your experiences and wishes in park landscapes, designs and layouts? What are your wants from such spaces? And what makes them successful?

    • #757208
      -Donnacha-
      Participant

      The Jardin de Luxembourg in Paris is my favourite – heavily wooded around the outside, which distances the central lawned garden from the surrounding city. Good seating around the pond/fountain and well as seating in under the trees with bandstands. Things happening around the garden in various areas – music, tai chi etc. – people really use the spaces .Really pleasant in Summer and in Winter. Also they use that grit/sand stuff as the surface throughout which is nicer than the tarmaced surfaces one generally gets in Ireland.

    • #757209
      genario
      Participant

      Is this park between the Lourve and the Champs Elysee? Oui/non?

    • #757210
      -Donnacha-
      Participant

      Non: it’s the one across from the Pantheon.

    • #757211
      jungle
      Participant

      As it was a quarry that was turned into a rubbish dump and finally turned into a park, the Parc des Buttes Chaumonts in the north-east of Paris may be interesting.

      A few pics from the net



      I believe one of Madrid’s city parks is also a former rubbish dump.

      I don’t think it is allowed to plant trees on a former rubbish dump for some time after closure now because it can increase the risk of groundwater pollution.

    • #757212
      TLM
      Participant

      Why is it that other countires can bring such imagination to amenities like their parks and Irish officials never do? Phoenix Pak could be really fantastic but it’s just a big badly kept praerie for the most part. At least the plans for Parnell Sq park are encouraging.

    • #757213
      PTB
      Participant

      Again in Paris, the Andre Citroen park, downriver a bit from the Eifel Tower, is a superb example of a modern park. It is out of the main tourist area so it is very quiet, it is beautifully laid out and has a balloon in the middle so you can go up and look down on it.

    • #757214
      jungle
      Participant

      I was thinking about what constitutes a successful park and realised it is quite hard to define. If you look at Dublin, St. Steven’s Green would count as a successful park based on the footfall there. However, to my mind, it is nowhere near as nice as a park as The Iveagh Gardens, which are just around the corner on Harcourt St.

      One of the things I like in a park is the ability to get out of the bustle and particularly the traffic noise of the city. Ironically, on this basis, the more successful a park is at attracting visitors, the less desirable it is to go there.

      Of course, these observations only really apply to city centre parks. Given it’s location, the Kinsale Rd landfill park will be more of a suburban park along the lines of Phoenix Park or Richmond Park in London [OK probably not as grand as either of them]. Knowing Cork City Council, they’ll cover it in soccer and GAA pitches and won’t leave any scope for a park.

    • #757215
      lexington
      Participant

      @jungle wrote:

      One of the things I like in a park is the ability to get out of the bustle and particularly the traffic noise of the city. Ironically, on this basis, the more successful a park is at attracting visitors, the less desirable it is to go there.

      Indeed this is true. What I find interesting about the role of park amenity facilities is how often they play a vital role in the sustainability and ‘livability’ of a city. I have no doubt New York would be near impossible to live in, without going crazy, were in not for Central Park and its extensive open green-areas like Sheep’s Meadow.

      Paris has some splendid parks – Parc des Buttes Chaumonts is a great example, thanks for those wonderful images jungle. As Bob Dole mentioned, the use of gritty sand surfaces gives a more organic feel to parks throughout the city and seem to enforce the clear distinction between urbania and nature. Tarmacadam to me always seems like an unwelcome visitor in a space which should be free of such intrusion – as though the outside city world id poking its nosey face into a place people come to escape from such presence. The Champs des Mar is another fine example of detailled landscaping and useage of this path surface.


      Champs des Mar as seen from the Eifel Tower. Taken in November 2004 so clearly the park is not shown in its best light.

      The problem with this surface is that when it rains, it makes strolling through the park are very muddy/dirty experience. And in Ireland, given its oh-so reliable weather, clearly that problem would be most unpleasant.

      So what can we wish for with the Kinsale Road “Landfill” Park? Will the council engage the wisdom and detail of such famous parks? A waterfall here and there? Stream walkways? Timber bridges? Open green spaces? Dense tree coverage? Gazebos? Or is that too much to expect? :rolleyes: Here’s hoping.

    • #757216
      phatman
      Participant

      @lexington wrote:

      … I have no doubt New York would be near impossible to live in, without going crazy, were it not for Central Park and its extensive open green-areas like Sheep’s Meadow.

      So what can we wish for with the Kinsale Road “Landfill” Park? Will the council engage the wisdom and detail of such famous parks? A waterfall here and there? Stream walkways? Timber bridges? Open green spaces? Dense tree coverage? Gazebos? Or is that too much to expect? :rolleyes: Here’s hoping.

      Yeh, long-term, it is vital to develop the Kinsale Road Landfill properly, and by properly I mean as a vibrant quarter in itself, not another unkempt ‘token’ greenspace. It really has the potential to become an important asset, and given the projected and probable future growth of the city, I don’t think the fact that it’s current ‘isolation’ should prove too much of a problem. What the City Council needs to do is to integrate the facility, connect it with other parts of the city via cycle lanes, walkways, buses etc – the Blackash park ‘n ride could even serve it short-term. I hope a proper job is made of this, that it becomes a place where people actually want to go, and not just another Phoenix park 😮
      Anyone been to Chicago? Perhaps the finest example i can think of for promoting ‘parkitecture’, virtually the whole lakefront is public amenity, with miles of cyclelanes, trees, fountains, flowerbeds, museums etc., really well designed, serving as a buffer bewtween the highrise and the water, really great. So there definitely is more than enough inspiration out there to make a decent attempt at the landfill, just keep those fingers crossed..

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