Over-river walkway in Cork

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    • #709521
      who_me
      Participant

      My parents’ house is by a river estuary (as in, the garden runs right to the river’s edge, no land in between).

      Recently, the local council have plans to build a boardwalk (I suppose, a walkway is a more apt description as it can’t be very wide) next to the river bank. It can’t be on the river bank as there are other buildings built right down to the edge of the bank; so I guess it’ll be built on poles driven into the river bed.

      I’m very curious – who “owns” the rights to this space over the river? I’d have thought it’s reasonable to expect if you buy a river-side property it’ll stay that way, barring some divine intervention..;)

      Apart from detracting from their home’s security and privacy, it seems like a poor idea for other reasons:

      – The river is very narrow at this point, so any reasonable walkway is likely to take away 1/4 to 1/3 the width of the river. I can’t imagine that’ll add much to its visual appeal.

      – To compound that, the river is tidal, and very prone to flooding. So unless they plan to make to make the first submarine boardwalk, it may have to be built quite high. Not only would this make it even more noticeable (especially at low tide when the boardwalk will be looming over mud), but it will mean the boardwalk will be above and looking down into my parents’ garden. It’s also likely to completely block any view of the water from their property.

      – The other river bank is completely unused (apart from occasional grazing) probably due to the flooding, yet isn’t being considered for the boardwalk.

      (Note- I’m not looking to lodge an objection. As far as they’re concerned it’s a fait accompli, but I’m confused and annoyed by this development; and wonder what the status is of these ‘over water’ developments).

    • #790887
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Might be worth checking the Land Registry- some riverside properties terminate at the river bank, some terminate in the centre of the stream afaik. I don’t know who’d own the river if your parents’ garden terminates at the bank. Waterways Ireland is responsible for the inland waterways of Ireland, including the land either side, but I think that only applies to man-made waterways such as canals. Might be worth giving them a call for any tips or leads.

    • #790888
      Anonymous
      Inactive
      who_me wrote:
      My parents’ house is by a river estuary (as in, the garden runs right to the river’s edge, no land in between).

      Recently, the local council have plans to build a boardwalk (I suppose, a walkway is a more apt description as it can’t be very wide) next to the river bank. It can’t be on the river bank as there are other buildings built right down to the edge of the bank]

      The river is the responsibility of the Department of the Marine. Any structure either over or across needs to have permission from then. They normally do not like the structure to have supports in the river. As it’s a local council though…..

    • #790889
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      im sure your local finsheries board would have a major issue with this development…. have you contacted them??

    • #790890
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Thanks for the advice all, I appreciate it!

      – ctesiphon: You’re right, Waterways Ireland only deal with the inland waterways. They might be a useful source of info though. I’ve no idea actually where the property boundary is – I’d have guessed the edge of the bank.

      The council have already CPO’ed (if that’s the right term here) a strip of her garden a few metres away to lay a new sewer across it, but I don’t know if that shows a willingness/ability to CPO land (or water!) for the walkway, if the boundary is mid-river or if part of the garden is needed for fencing etc.

      – wearnicehats: Interesting, I wonder if there is some form of planning application process for work like this? Though I have no intention of objecting, I wouldn’t mind getting a look at what’s going up there before it goes up (for all I know, it may already have been approved).

      – henno: It is a fishing river, but that’s more upstream so I don’t know if it’s a factor. Hadn’t thought of making inquiries in that direction, thanks.

    • #790891
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I’ve been living in Brisbane for the past couple of months and the riverside walkways there are a great public amenity. I always think of how Cork could benefit from similar projects. The one you’re describing though who_me, sounds like a strange place to start a walkway. It’s hard to picture it though without knowing what river you’re talking about, or if it’s the Lee, then which part of the Lee. Narrow but tidal would lead me to think it’s not the Lee in or near the city at least. Sure it might not even be in Cork come to think of it!

      Anyway, while that’s not too relevant, regarding one point you raised —

      – To compound that, the river is tidal, and very prone to flooding. So unless they plan to make to make the first submarine boardwalk, it may have to be built quite high. Not only would this make it even more noticeable (especially at low tide when the boardwalk will be looming over mud), but it will mean the boardwalk will be above and looking down into my parents’ garden. It’s also likely to completely block any view of the water from their property.

      Part of the network of riverside walkways in Brisbane was just opened in 2003. Many private properties stretch down to the river’s edge, and as such there was no way to continue a public walkway along this stretch of the river. So they build a floating pontoon type thingy (excuse the technical lingo) for this particular stretch, which has worked out very well. The public can enjoy the uninterrupted walk along the riverside, the private residents still have their riverside access. As some of these residences have jetties for mooring boats, the walkway is sufficiently far from the bank in places to allow for this, and can be swung open on occasions where required to allow boat access.

      Of course the main differences between this and the scenario you describe is that the river here is very wide, and the banks steep, so views from the properties are barely affected at all. It does, however, allow for the construction of a boardwalk without interfering with properties on the banks, and as the walkway floats it’s always the same height above the water.

      Brisbane ’s RiverWalk is a leisurely walk from Sydney Street. RiverWalk is an 850 metre long floating walkway between New Farm and the Howard Smith Wharves, under the Story Bridge. The pontoon structure which sits 35 metres from the riverbank has been designed to allow people to experience the feeling of being on the river – of literally walking on water.

      http://www.satellite-sightseer.com/id/10376/Australia/Queensland/Brisbane/Brisbane_River_Floating_Walkway

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brisbane_River#Brisbane%20Riverwalk

      http://www.burchillpartners.com.au/m-bcc.htm

    • #790892
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      A floating walkway such as that would be more appealing, certainly!

      However, this is actually a small town council in West Cork, so I doubt they have the finances for something such as that. Now that I think about it, at low tide the river bed near the banks is exposed (it’s deeper mid-channel), so I’m not sure about the appeal of strolling along the walkway sitting in mud down below the banks.;)

    • #790893
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I wonder if we are speaking of the same walkway, (The Mardyke?)
      CCC have been planning this walkway for years yet they recently granted planning permission to a sports club to build right out to the river bank thus cutting the walkway in half.:o

    • #790894
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Nope, my parents’ house is in West (County) Cork. I wasn’t aware of plans to build a walkway there – do you mean from near the new pedestrian bridge West towards the park?

    • #790895
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @who_me wrote:

      Nope, my parents’ house is in West (County) Cork. I wasn’t aware of plans to build a walkway there – do you mean from near the new pedestrian bridge West towards the park?

      Thats the one.
      When you mentioned the CPO i thought it may be this city walkway as CCC had problems getting title to a small landbank to facilitate their plans.

    • #790896
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Tidal you say, Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources would have to give a foreshore licence for anything being built. Marinas, pontoons all have to get this, seperate to aany actual joining of the structure to the mainland if I can call it that.

      link here might hive you some help :

      http://www.dcmnr.gov.ie/Marine/Coastal+Zone+Management/Foreshore+Administration/

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