Most Beautiful Building in Cork?

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    • #707374
      Nick
      Participant

      Suggestions for most Beutifull Building in Cork?
      must be built -no proposals or under constructions

    • #746862
      Nick
      Participant

      Crawford Extension Erick Van Egeraat definatley one of the best

    • #746863
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster
    • #746864
      d_d_dallas
      Participant

      Holy Trinity by faaaaaaar…

    • #746865
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      For me it is either Kent Railway Station, with that amazing curved wall, or The Christ the King Church:

      turnerscross.com/…/ ctk_cork_full_front_view

    • #746866
      mickeydocs
      Participant

      St. Marys on Pope’s Quay deserves a mention for its beautiful neo-classical columns.

      Originally posted by phil
      For me it is either Kent Railway Station, with that amazing curved wall, or The Christ the King Church:

      turnerscross.com/…/ ctk_cork_full_front_view

    • #746867
      lexington
      Participant

      Marble & Lemon building at Emmet Place – rarely mentioned, small but beautiful.

      There are are number of buildings along South Mall that stand-out. City Hall has its moments. Plus those old department store buildings like Burtons, what is now Brown Thomas, Roches Stores and the former Grant Building all along Patrick’s Street (most designed by Foster & Grant) are all noteworthy. But St. Finbarr’s is by far the biggest eye-catcher.

      New entries I think are noteworthy are the UCC Student Centre extension, No.5 Lapps Quay, RCI Building in Mahon, Estuary Court at Rochestown and Mercy University Hospital on Grenville Place. Lewis Glucksman Gallery, UCC – Coppinger Court and Tony Macken’s small but stand-out apartment building on Henry Street.

    • #746868
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster
    • #746869
      sw101
      Participant

      nuff said

    • #746870
      d_d_dallas
      Participant

      Haha! I was waiting for it to pop up!!!

      Crawford extension is v.interesting (excuse quality – compressed for web smallness)

    • #746871
      d_d_dallas
      Participant

      Holy Trinity from side

    • #746872
      d_d_dallas
      Participant

      BT’s on Pat St

    • #746873
      Nick
      Participant

      The Opera House by Murray .O.Laoire Architects.
      The new Student Centre in UCC by O.R.S.A with the public space outside.

      What does everyone honestly think of the Crawford Extension?

    • #746874
      corkdood
      Participant

      Originally posted by Nick

      What does everyone honestly think of the Crawford Extension?

      I’m not impressed by it – it looks like an angry spot thats about to burst!

    • #746875
      -Donnacha-
      Participant

      i think the van egeraat extension was very clever and works quite well. i personally am fond of it, particularly the flow and bulging of brickwork to half moon street

    • #746876
      Nick
      Participant

      I think its really worrying that no one has mentioned Patricks street in this whole debate, is cork devoid of any high quality public space~?:confused: surely we can do better than some pretty awfull churches and a gallery no one seems to agree on.

    • #746877
      asdasd
      Participant

      Brown Thomas is on Patrick Street, and that was mentioned. As a whole Patrick street has very fine buildings. All of the sruff that Paul Clerkin mentioned, except St Mary’s, is on Patricks Street, afaik.

    • #746878
      Nick
      Participant

      partick st. as a whole. On a Saturady Morning or friday afternoon it is by far one of the most beutifull places in Cork city.
      It is itself a single peace of urban design.

    • #746879
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Originally posted by Nick
      surely we can do better than some pretty awfull churches and a gallery no one seems to agree on.

      The Churches of Cork are one of its greatest assetts architecturally speaking. Some might not be regarded in as high esteem as others, and I am willing to accept that the one I put forward would probably not be to everyones taste. I also think that it is good that there is some difference of opinion on the gallery. That is what discussion is meant to be about.

    • #746880
      Anonymous
      Participant

      The High Court,

      I’ve always loved simple classical statements

    • #746881
      Nick
      Participant

      Phil , i agree I just find it frustrating to see poor design(modern) in cork particularly in housing and commercial sectors being produced and i worry that our developers are not allocating enough High quality public space so the city can function as a whole, rather than isolated buildings. I look forward to seeing what the Quays will look like in 5 or 10 years time when all this developemnt has calmed. Hopefully a new perspective on the city will have bee generated, and the effeort put into patrick st and paul st. will become infectous

    • #746882
      d_d_dallas
      Participant

      “pretty awful churches” – WTF?!?

    • #746883
      GrahamH
      Participant

      St Marys is drool-worthy – it’s always so nice to see a departure from boring old Doric.
      Weird to see Herself up there in place of classical statuary, bit like St Andrews up in Dublin.

    • #746884
      Nick
      Participant

      n’uff said! don’t think your answering my question still no decent suggestions for a decent public space in cork , guess there arn’t any there pitty ho hum! maybe someone should design one , now thats a good idea! suggestions for a location?

    • #746885
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Nick. I am not sure that I get your approach to this thread. Originally you entitled the thread “Most Beautiful Building in Cork”. Then you altered the question to enquire about decent public spaces in Cork. I think that your public space question probably needs a separate thread, because when people see the original title of this thread they will automatically answer the original question. These issues are both very different and need to be treated separately. Anyway, in answer to your second question, I think that the area on front of the Opera house has a lot of potential.

    • #746886
      Nick
      Participant

      Apologies phil you are correct, it does deserve a different thread, maybe i was wrong to ask such a question in the first place, having spent my life in cork i guess i should have known better….!
      Just thought there might have been something i had missed, or that people might have a different perspective on this potentially great city that would convince me otherwise. Having seen the images of buildings discussed on this site ,i guess Green is the order of the day.

      (now how do i close this thread!?)

    • #746887
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      As far as I know you cannot close a thread (but you were probably joking about that anyway) Also, I thought the original question you asked was really interesting. I am suprised it has not generated any more replies or more discussion, paricularly from the people who regularly discuss other aspects of Cork.

    • #746888
      Nick
      Participant

      sad but true. when will we ever learn?

    • #746889
      -Donnacha-
      Participant

      what do people think of the boole library?

      saw it recently in night time, for the first time in a few years, and i think its definitely up there with cork’s best buildings- a real classic in my opinion. it a strong and commanding structure, but manages to avoid undermining the particular quality of the quad. it has also aged very well (so far) and is as ‘fresh’ as it was when first opened. in addition, it functions very well and is a very effective library space. anyone?

    • #746890
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I remember seeing this from the outside and quite liking it.

    • #746891
      satanta99
      Participant

      Have to agree with you about The Boole Library. Before the GLuckman Gallery was built, the library was my favourite building. Although it is dated on the inside it will undergo substantial refurbishment in the near future. It has some of the best views in Cork. Especially on Q+3, in the south west corner, there is a fantastic vista of the city.

    • #746892
      -Donnacha-
      Participant

      does anyone know anything about which side of the boole library is being extended. Tommy Barker, in today’s examiner, seems to suggest it will be extended on the north side – facing the quad- is this the case? it would be a shame. surely the south side to the quarry would be preferable.

      other favourite buildings

      -old Cork & Limerick Savings Bank, Lapps Quay/Parnell Place
      -old Lord Mayors House near Grenville Place (Mercy Hosp)
      -Crawford & its extension to half moon st
      -St Marys, Popes Quay
      -Turners X Church
      -Warehouses, Custom House Point
      -College of Commerce Building (even better with its rooftop extension)
      -firkin crane butter market

    • #746893
      Nick
      Participant

      i love the boole and the complex of theatres and shops its definatly stood the test of time well and the space outside isnt bad either , Ucc is beginning to turn into a bit a hot bed for good stuff pitty about the blueGrey building next to it.
      sorry cant get he examiner where i am, not sure where its being developed!sounds interesting though.
      whats the new gallery like, havnt been home in 5 months.

    • #746894
      phatman
      Participant

      The now-to-go ahead extension of the boole you mentioned is to be developed to the east of the current building, not in front of it , if that’s what you feared. There really isnt a whole lot of room where it is to be built, i saw the drawing on the examiner, from outside the o rahilly building towards the library. From what i could make out it seems as if it’s to be built over the avenue towards the gates on college road, which would be a real pity if im right, as in my opinion this is the nicest entrance to the college, affording great views of the quad on the way in.the design looks pretty good, fits in well with the surroundings, the same firm has designed libraries for harvard and yale among others in the us, so we can rest assured it’ll be a quality job.should be complete around early 2007 sometime i believe. i agree with whoever complained about the “blue-grey” building next to it, thats the o rahilly building, doesnt fit in well at all, shouldnt be so bad when all those new trees mature though. That’s what the whole area from the boole to the student centre is lacking, some tree-cover, very open as it is, can be bleak on a wet day.all we can do is wait, but the signs are good for ucc!

    • #746895
      Devin
      Participant

      One of the finest and most overlooked buildings in Cork is the Old County Jail near UCC.( not the one in Sundays Well)

      Only the south entrance wall with a severe Doric portico survives. Designed by the Pain Bros in the early 19th. C. it is a superb use of the Classical idion to create boldness and severity.

      It is one of the very few works in Ireland to reflect the pared down style of Soane or Ledoux

    • #746896
      Devin
      Participant

      That last post (above) was by Ian L. of An Taisce (not Devin) – he grabbed my computer while I wasn’t looking!

      Me, I love the green vitrolite shoeshop shopfront on Oliver Plunkett Street. In fact my mother’s from Cork & remembers this shop opening as a kid in the ’50s. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #746897
      Anonymous
      Participant

      Originally posted by Devin
      One of the finest and most overlooked buildings in Cork is the Old County Jail near UCC.( not the one in Sundays Well)

      Only the south entrance wall with a severe Doric portico survives. Designed by the Pain Bros in the early 19th. C. it is a superb use of the Classical idion to create boldness and severity.

      It is one of the very few works in Ireland to reflect the pared down style of Soane or Ledoux

      Very topical,

      I had a feeling that wasn’t you Devin

    • #746898
      lexington
      Participant

      Surprised no-body mentioned ‘Bishop Lucey Park’ – the “Peace Park” as a good example of open public space – small, but an important break in the rows of buildings that dominate the city centre. Cork as a whole suffers from insufficient public space. New parks will hopefully be realised at Horgan’s Quay and a significant 27-acre park along the Carrigrohane Straight. The Kinsale Road Landfill is being converted to a new public park – with sporting grounds, a wildlife park, forestry and green-spaces. I have high hopes for this endeavour.

      As for squares, plazas etc – the docklands represents the best opportunity to considerately create such spaces.

    • #746899
      A-ha
      Participant

      One of my favourite of Cork buildings is UCC. But also the building that is presently occupied by Brown Thomas. Some of Cork’s newly built buildings are also on the favourite list. Maybe even the airport when it is built. It’s simple, but the roof makes it look elegant. And I realise that the last post to this forum (before lexington’s) was late last year, but I wasn’t registered then, so I’ll have my say now. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #746900
      Radioactiveman
      Participant

      @lexington wrote:

      Surprised no-body mentioned ‘Bishop Lucey Park’ – the “Peace Park” as a good example of open public space – small, but an important break in the rows of buildings that dominate the city centre.

      Agreed, it’s a lovely spot.
      Just to be pedantic about it however- Bishop Lucey Park is that park stretching from South Main Street to Grand Parade, the one which I believe you are referring to Lex. It is not and has never been officially called the Peace Park.
      The peace park is that small green area at the corner of Grand Parade and South Mall which contains the Hiroshima/Nagasaki memorial and the WW2 memorial.

      Its just a small thing, but it really bugs me and the confusion seems to be spreading.

    • #746901
      d_d_dallas
      Participant

      Maybe so – but Bishop L Park is known as as the Peace Park …for reasons best left untouched…

    • #746902
      anto
      Participant

      Funny but the Church of Ireland gave that land to Cork Corp and the Corpo named it after the most conservative catholic bishop of the last century

    • #746903
      lexington
      Participant

      @d_d_dallas wrote:

      Maybe so – but Bishop L Park is known as as the Peace Park …for reasons best left untouched…

      :p Yeah, the less said the better…the spirit of the sixties still seems prevailent in many of the facility’s patrons! ๐Ÿ˜€ Hmmmm.

      Apologises RM – those misunderstandings can be irritating I know – but I’ll take your word for it.

      anto – that is indeed an interesting fact. The park is an important element of the city centre – it breaks up the cluster of city centre structures and provides an petite but important escape from the concrete and car-fumes. The CoI are to be thanked for facilitating this.

    • #746904
      A-ha
      Participant

      The City Hall has to get a mention too. I think it’s most beautiful at dusk, while it is still bright outside but the lights eluminate it and it’s refelection can be seen in the Lee.
      City Hall at Night.

    • #746905
      A-ha
      Participant

      No more opinions on Cork’s Most Beautiful Building. I thought they’re would be loads of people giving their input. Ye gotta have some favs.

    • #746906
      lexington
      Participant

      No.3 Paul Street – one of the most overlooked, and most distinctive buildings in the Cork skyline. Built I believe to compliment nearby St. Peter’s & Paul’s Church, the building is an invaluable contributor to the city’s viewscape. It’s use of Cork Limestone and red-brick blend elegantly, topped by a slated, skyline punctuating tower which peaks in a perfect V-shaped point, topped with spoked railings. I could well be wrong but I believe it peaks at just over 29m, perhaps 30m. If anyone has better info than me on that building, please share it. Would love to see some images of it up on this thread. I believe th building serves a number of functions nowadays, not least among them acting as a Cura Centre.

    • #746907
      GrahamH
      Participant

      It’s not this building I presume given your description, but I think I know the one you mean – very fine.

      And perhaps not what you’d exactly describe as beautiful, and one of the oldest ones in the book I know, but Roches is a fine block of a building to quote ctesiphon ๐Ÿ˜‰ – and probably the only building I know of where white aluminum works reasonably well in places ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

    • #746908
      Devin
      Participant

      Some wonderful 20th century department stores along Partick’s Street – the former Grant’s:

    • #746909
      Morlan
      Participant

      @A-ha wrote:

      The City Hall has to get a mention too. I think it’s most beautiful at dusk, while it is still bright outside but the lights eluminate it and it’s refelection can be seen in the Lee.
      City Hall at Night.

      There’s a touch of Gandon about that building..

    • #746910
      lexington
      Participant

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      It’s not this building I presume given your description, but I think I know the one you mean – very fine.

      That’s St. Peter’s & Paul’s, which externally and internally is quite spectacular – must get some inside shots some day. The detail is jaw-dropping. No.3 Paul Street is the building further north along that street at the ‘T-junction’ with Paul Street – quite inspiring. Thanks for the images Graham. I agree about Roches Stores – it just works well.



      Devin – both the former Burtons and Grants Department Stores on Patrick’s Street are beautiful pieces. I posted something of them in the LADSOCL thread many moons ago and for a long while I had been investigating their re-usage. The upper floors are predominantly for storage in both buildings, with tacky ground floor signage (shudder!). Though the Grant Store has some usage on the upper floors, it is hardly appropriate for such a fine building. My intentions were to rearrange the internal order of the building’s floor usage to allow them open up into multi-tenant facilities whilst restoring their former glory. The Grant building would have had a complete elevation overhaul/refurbishment – much of the Patrick’s Street facade has become grotty and ill maintained – the revamp would have rectified that. Existing tenants could be maintained, but would require realteration. For example, Burger King would have maintained its location, only it would be reorganised over 2-floors (equating to the same floor space), so as to free up access and usage to other tenants. The English Market entrance would provide main access to the building with a restructured interior to accommodate a dome-like ceiling-based light access feature, looped balconies and new tenant space. Current interiors are somewhat lacking.

      I feel much of the same could be achieved with the Burton’s store also, but on a smaller scale. It’s a shame to see such magnificent buildings go to waste when they possess so much potential – even from the proprietor’s stance, their renewal offers a source of increased revenue in the long-run.


      Burtons


      Grants

    • #746911
      ctesiphon
      Participant
      Graham Hickey wrote:
      And perhaps not what you’d exactly describe as beautiful, and one of the oldest ones in the book I know, but Roches is a fine block of a building to quote ctesiphon ]

      I was misquoted / you took my comments out of context / what I meant to say was… ๐Ÿ˜‰

      I find it hard to pick a favourite building, but the whole harbour area- bonded warehouses, R&H Hall- has a very special character.
      Maybe the Courthouse on Washington Street? One of only two octastyle buildings in the whole of the RoI, a rare example of a building occupying an entire city block, and a glorious interior too.
      Or Lapp’s Quay?
      Or the group of terraces on the road in from the Fermoy (Dublin) roundabout, each of which has its own bridge over the railway line?

      Sometimes it’s a bit like playing favourites with one’s children (I imagine).

      EDIT: I forgot Skiddy’s Alms House in Shandon.

    • #746912
      GrahamH
      Participant

      Any house with alm as a prefix just screams chocolate box appeal ๐Ÿ™‚

      Yes the Washington St Courthouse is spectacular – are there only two octastyles in Ireland?! I knew there was less than 5 or so, but 2? What’s the other ctesiphon?
      I was very impressed with the stone used in the portico which has a wonderful grain to it:

      Ah modrin technology ๐Ÿ™‚

      Interesting info about Grant’s Lexington, here’s a wider view including that terrible Burger King shopfront.

      The upper facade could look great if properly restored. At least the windows are all intact.

      Burton’s condition is also disappointing – especially that clunky Oasis sign. Can’t get over how that was permitted by Cork CC, especially given how recent it is.

    • #746913
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      Yes the Washington St Courthouse is spectacular – are there only two octastyles in Ireland?! I knew there was less than 5 or so, but 2? What’s the other ctesiphon?

      Is that Graham doing his contemporary ‘little match girl’ routine on the steps? “Spare the price of a blank cd, guv?”

      I think there are only two, but I could be wrong. (If so, I’d be grateful to be corrected.)
      Re the second one- I’m tempted to make this into a quiz, but I can’t think what prize to offer.
      It’s Carlow Courthouse by W.V. Morrison.

    • #746914
      A-ha
      Participant


      The Savoy is a really great building in Cork aswell. It’s a really good example of art deco in Ireland, and it has to be the finest art deco building in the city.

    • #746915
      GrahamH
      Participant

      A fine understated piece – nice set of windows there too.

      Thanks for Carlow ctesiphon – wow!

      Is this Washington or Carlow town?!
      The site the picture is linked from says Cork’s courthouse was originally planned for Carlow but they go mixed up. Sounds credible considering their similarities in the portico department.

      Is that Graham doing his contemporary ‘little match girl’ routine on the steps?

      The photographer stays behind the camera ctesiphon, behind – to press the button like.
      And I do not appreciate being compared to Stephen Gately in appearance thanks very much ๐Ÿ˜€

      The famous Three of course have to feature:

      – utterly depressing to see the derelict Georgian being used as an access point to a car park, and especially standing in such a prominent position. It ought to be compulsorily acquired if not secured immediately by the owner and plans put forward for a full restoration.
      The state-hung houses next door though look just fantastic in real life ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #746916
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      The site the picture is linked from says Cork’s courthouse was originally planned for Carlow but they go mixed up. Sounds credible considering their similarities in the portico department.

      Though the Cork building occupies a city block, whereas Carlow has a much more ‘in the round’ feel befitting its prominent corner site in the town.

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      The famous Three of course have to feature:

      [swoon]

    • #746917
      altuistic
      Participant

      I’ve been very happy to see a number of houses, buildings around Cork are being carefully restored and reformed to their old glory. the corner house at North Main st and Paradise Place is a greate example and some of the buildings along washington street west. They have had those awful awful paint coatings stripped, the original brick work reexposed and refurbished. Such work gives an important look back at the past and how this buildings were intended to be seen and they are so much more beautiful for their efforts. Careful attention has been applied to shopfronts and such with many classical wooden frames being delicately restored.

    • #746918
      GrahamH
      Participant

      These Georgians here altuistic near the Courthouse?

      Some lovely stuff, and a bizarrely large roof to boot!

      You can just make out the swirls of crown glass in some of the panes – really fantastic that these most unusual pane-arranged sashes were preserved. Saying that, they could do with another lick of paint at this stage…

      (Suffice to say they also feature in that Roche/IGS book)

    • #746919
      Devin
      Participant

      That’s a lovely group on Sheare’s Street. They recently won a conservation award, didn’t they?

      I love this unified terrace on Washington Street – they’re as good as anything by the Wide Streets Commissioners in Dublin (& same mezzanine shopfront concept). But they’re in a bad way – lots of unsympathetic alterations. I would love to see them receive some attention:

      (sorry about blurry-ness; shrinking images down a lot loses sharpness)

    • #746920
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      @Graham Hickey wrote:

      These Georgians here altuistic near the Courthouse?
      Some lovely stuff, and a bizarrely large roof to boot!

      You can just make out the swirls of crown glass in some of the panes – really fantastic that these most unusual pane-arranged sashes were preserved. Saying that, they could do with another lick of paint at this stage…

      That’s Fenn’s Quay (which is what I meant when I said Lapp’s Quay in an earlier post above ๐Ÿ˜ฎ – I’m sure the natives were scratching their heads). Lovely job, it’s true. And yes, Devin, it won an RIAI medal for conservation.

    • #746921
      Devin
      Participant

      They’re on Sheare’s Street. Fenn’s Quay was an old name from when the street was a water course. It was resurrected as the restored terrace were originally quay-houses.

      What I’m wondering is why they only received the conservation medal this year when the restoration was completed at least 7 years ago…

    • #746922
      A-ha
      Participant


      What was the original name given to the building that is occupied by Vero Moda. It’s stunning, but could do with a clean.

    • #746923
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      Originally was Egans, a jewellers afaik

    • #746924
      lexington
      Participant

      @Devin wrote:

      They’re on Sheare’s Street. Fenn’s Quay was an old name from when the street was a water course. It was resurrected as the restored terrace were originally quay-houses.

      What I’m wondering is why they only received the conservation medal this year when the restoration was completed at least 7 years ago…

      Not sure it was 7 years ago – but indeed you are right, Jack Coughlan & Associates were responsible for overseeing their restoration. The interior (especially the upper floors) are just as, if not, more eye-catching than the exterior elevations. If it was 7 years ago – I’m feeling very old. :p

      Fenn’s Quay is a beautiful row indeed. Another most interesting row of houses – only recently granted Protected Structure status – are the Wilton Villas along the Glasheen Road (just before the Wilton Roundabout). These most unusual style houses comprise of Munster Limestone blocks, blood-red brick edging and originally (although I do believe the years have seen changes to this) locally sourced slate tiling on the roof-tops. Lovely little row.

    • #746925
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      @Devin wrote:

      They’re on Sheare’s Street. Fenn’s Quay was an old name from when the street was a water course. It was resurrected as the restored terrace were originally quay-houses.

      Aah come now, Devin. I never disputed that they were on Sheare’s Street. But the group is known as Fenn’s Quay, particularly since the completion of the conservation job. Maybe if I’d written: ‘That’s “Fenn’s Quay”…’
      The reason I mentioned the name in my previous post was to correct my previous error- not to correct your post.

      Am I forgiven? ]was[/I] seven years ago that they were finished, despite what the RIAI site says. I have memories of seeing the work ongoing in 2000(ish?).

    • #746926
      A-ha
      Participant

      Is anyone able to post a picture or painting or anything of the old City Hall, I have no idea what it looks like.

    • #746927
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster
    • #746928
      A-ha
      Participant

      Thanks Paul, but I’m on about the old City Hall, lol.

    • #746929
      PTB
      Participant

      @A-ha wrote:


      The Savoy is a really great building in Cork aswell. It’s a really good example of art deco in Ireland, and it has to be the finest art deco building in the city.

      What about the Christ the King church. Or is that art nouveau?

    • #746930
      A-ha
      Participant

      I don’t think it’s art deco…. it’s too “modern”, but it seems to be in the same sort of style. I’ve never been in the church so don’t know what the interior is like, but I’ve never seen a church like it anywhere in Ireland.

    • #746931
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster
    • #746932
      A-ha
      Participant

      Thanks Paul, first time I’ve ever seen the inside of the church.

    • #746933
      Radioactiveman
      Participant

      As we’re on the subject of churches, I’m doing a little research on Blackpool Church which was designed by noted Cork Sculptor Seamus Murphy. Any information, drawings, plans etc. about the same would be very welcome.

    • #746934
      A-ha
      Participant

      Can’t help you there, but I’m still looking for a picture of the old City Hall, anyone got one?

    • #746935
      A-ha
      Participant

      Is there some sort of council dedicated to clean up old buildings? I noticed a few days back that the Queens Old Caste looked absolutley rotten. For such a beautiful building, they make it look awful. Surely some organisation can force Argos or Virgin to paint it or do something to it anyway. It spoils the area!

    • #746936
      ctesiphon
      Participant

      Don’t know the building, but if it’s a Protected Structure (as seems possible from the name) then the planning Authority (Cork CC?) has powers under the P&D Act 2000 to compel the owner (and/or occupier) to act, though if the matter is (ahem) only cosmetic then I’m not sure if those powers are all that applicable.
      If it is in an Architectural Conservation Area or an Area of Special Planning Control, then similar provisions exist regardless of whether the building itself is a Protected Structure.

      Perhaps shame is the best weapon? (i.e. if the other buildings on the street show this one up in a bad light.)

    • #746937
      A-ha
      Participant

      This is Queens Old Caslte, just so you have a rough idea of what it looks like, can’t find a better picture just yet. It looks fine in that picture ‘cos it’s dark, but the paint job looks scruffy in the last few weeks. I wouldn’t imagine it to be a listed building (not the grade whatever number it is that restricts you from doing fu*k all to it anyway) but I would imagine that a paint job would do no harm, who ever it is that is in authority

    • #746938
      Devin
      Participant

      @A-ha wrote:

      I noticed a few days back that the Queens Old Caste looked absolutley rotten. For such a beautiful building, they make it look awful. Surely some organisation can force Argos or Virgin to paint it or do something to it anyway. It spoils the area!

      I don’t know what you’re talking about. The building is painted white and looks clean and well-maintained.

      The problem with the building is that you have to blot out the ground floor when you look at it because some idiot (either Virgin or a tenant before them) decided to put short Greek Doric columns with plain Doric capitals at their bases ( ๐Ÿ˜€ ) in the shop entrance, to “follow” the well-executed pedimented Greek Doric feature in the 1st floor. The result is disastrous – no proportional logic between the upper & lower part of the building.

      See here for a daytime pic: http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=record&county=CO&regno=20512635

    • #746939
      A-ha
      Participant

      When did you last see it? Either that or it was just the bottom area of the building I saw as I was going into Virgin (which really did look grubby). Thanks for the picture, if I was looking till now, I still wouldn’t be able to find one.

    • #746940
      Devin
      Participant

      @A-ha wrote:

      When did you last see it?

      A few days ago.

      @A-ha wrote:

      Thanks for the picture

      If you click ‘Additional Images’ in the top right of the link, there are a few more pics of it.
      Or just click here: http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/search.jsp?type=images&county=CO&regno=20512635

    • #746941
      lexington
      Participant

      @A-ha wrote:

      When did you last see it? Either that or it was just the bottom area of the building I saw as I was going into Virgin (which really did look grubby). Thanks for the picture, if I was looking till now, I still wouldn’t be able to find one.

      The Queens Old Castle has recently been given a new fresh paint of coat and cleaned. Virgin have erected new signage – a little classier (black) than it’s bile yellow predecessor.

      Also, I was delighted to see NorthGate House has finally been repainted after months of flaking and chipped paintwork. It looked dreadful across NorthGate Bridge. Now if they could only weed the moss from the drains we’d be set – and maybe the Gate & GardenView apartments could take a hinter. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    • #746942
      A-ha
      Participant

      I wouldn’t get your hopes up. After all, a big job like weeding out the moss takes alot of consideration, not to mention going to the city council, the planning authorities and what have you. Yeah right! I’d be quicker if I went and did it myself.

    • #746943
      lexington
      Participant

      @A-ha wrote:

      I wouldn’t get your hopes up. After all, a big job like weeding out the moss takes alot of consideration, not to mention going to the city council, the planning authorities and what have you. Yeah right! I’d be quicker if I went and did it myself.

      Believe it or not, they did weed the moss from the drains! Fair play! ๐Ÿ˜‰ The building looks remarkable better for it too – now if we can only do something about the unsight tarmac paving fronting NorthGate Bridge (a grass divide with granite pathway and trees???) and tidy up the damp stains and poor paint along the Gate Multiplex and adjoining apartments, we’ll be set! ๐Ÿ˜ฎ

    • #746944
      A-ha
      Participant

      I know everyone slags them off now and again, including me, but I think it is a credit to the council that they are keeping our pavements so clean. I don’t think other city councils put as much effort into taking chewing gum off the pavements then they do in Cork. I know it’s only something small, but it’s always something I notice not just in Cork but in Dublin or Limerick aswell. I believe getting rid of chewing gum is one of the most expensive areas in keeping an area clean and it’s good to see so much effort being put into the small little things that most people don’t even care about. God, I am such a loser, I just spent the last five minutes writing a post about chewing gum. And remember…. chewing gum is a priviliage, dispose of it properly. It is banned in Singapore!

    • #746945
      A-ha
      Participant

      Anyone able to tell me anything about the building that houses Meadows and Byrne in Academy Street??? It’s really nice, but don’t know anything about it.

    • #746946
      lawyer
      Participant

      A-ha,
      Type Central Hall+Academy Street into Google Ireland and you will get your answer

    • #746947
      A-ha
      Participant

      Thanks lawyer, I didn’t even know the name of the building. It’s got quite an impressive history to it aswell. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • #746948
      redabbeyredux
      Participant

      Converting this into a City-centre pad is my fantasy project. Gorgeously simple architecture, practically next door to Idaho cafรƒยฉ. . .

    • #746949
      Radioactiveman
      Participant

      You’re right redabbey. I mentioned this building way back. There was a cork2005 event held there and i managed to get a good look round. Its empty inside and has huge rooms just crying out to be converted into art gallery, restaurant, etc.
      Top floor has some really interesting remnants of Corks old tram system too.
      The building is owned by ESB.

    • #746950
      A-ha
      Participant

      Where were the trams kept at night time? There must have been some type of yard where they kept them? I love looking at all the pictures of them. Good exhibition on a few months back in one of the art galleries showing old photos and paintings. Shame they’re gone.

    • #746951
      lawyer
      Participant

      @A-ha wrote:

      Where were the trams kept at night time? There must have been some type of yard where they kept them? I love looking at all the pictures of them. Good exhibition on a few months back in one of the art galleries showing old photos and paintings. Shame they’re gone.

      There was a tram garage on Albert Road – top end, near the traffic lights.
      It later became a depot for the ESB and is now used for various things including the Cork Sculpture Factory.
      Trams ran to various places such as Blackrock, St. Lukes and the Western Road.

      If you are really interested in the trams and their history, try the City Library for a book called ‘Tram Tracks through Cork’ by Walter McGrath and published in 1981.

    • #746952
      Anonymous
      Participant
    • #746953
      A-ha
      Participant

      Thanks lawer. I’m not just interested in the trams in Cork, i’m interested in everything to do with transportation. The city was better served by public transport back then, then it is now… it’s such a pity. Did Galway or Waterford ever have trams? I presume Limerick’s tram system went about the same time as Corks. I’m sure they’re equally annoyed that the lost their tram network too. Stupid Irish Government… they can’t get anything right, lol. Thanks again.

    • #746954
      Boyler
      Participant

      I know Galway had trams in the nineteenth to early twentith centuries.

    • #746955
      ake
      Participant

      Most beautiful building in Cork is obviously Finbars cathedral, the best neo-gothic on the island.

    • #746956
      lexington
      Participant

      A surprisingly and unfortunately overlooked building in my view is the magnificent St. Vincent’s Church in Sunday’s Well. Built between 1851 and 1854, the church and monastery officially opened on 24th October 1854.



      “The building is a remarkably successful use of a difficult site. The southern aisle of the church (1851) is prolonged into a residential range, three floors high, that turns a right angle before abruptly terminating at the street, making up two sides of a piazza in front of the church. A floor below the level of the piazza a vaulted hall opens directly on to a garden terrace to the south. Above, a pivotal corner turret is corbelled out on a stunted column. Similar stunted columns hold up the arches that divide the flights of the principal staircase.”
      – Jeremy Williams, ” A Companion Guide to Architecture in Ireland, 1837-1921″
      (Irish Academic Press, Dublin, 1994).

      It enjoys a wonderful perspective overlooking the city, notably Fitzgerald’s Park and surrounds, from the sharply steep Northern slopes of the city. It reminds one of some sort of Central European palace bracing Cork’s unique and interesting topography.

    • #746957
      Boyler
      Participant

      Very nice!

    • #746958
      A-ha
      Participant

      It looks very similar to areas of Prague or Budapest. That gothic type of architecture is very prominant throughout the building.

    • #746959
      Anonymous
      Participant

      I think it would be fair to say that it is simply an Eastern European influence as I have seen similar styles as far east as Latvia

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