Listed Buildings and Planning Permission

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    • #705277
      MichaelMac
      Participant

      Hi All,

      I have a question for all architecture people. I’m thinking of buying a terraced house in Ranelagh that I’ve found out is a “Protected Structure” i.e. listed. The house needs a lot of general repairs, but my main question is – how difficult would it be to get permission to do an extension, out the back of the house?

      There is currently a small kitchen which has been added to the house, but it is in an awful state of repair and needs to be demolished and rebuilt. The extension I’d be looking to do would be bigger than the existing kitchen. A window in the house has been changed into a door to allow for access to the kitchen.

      If you don’t know the answer, could you point me towards somebody who would know? I assume this is a common problem for people wondering whether they will buy a listed building.

      Many thanks,

      Michael

    • #718707
      FIN
      Participant

      it will depend on the actual listing of the building…there are different grades…but you will need an archeoligical report and an engineer’s report comdeming the existing extension and then it is really up to the descretion of the city council…if you can prove you will be improving it then they shouldn’t have a major objection but then again there are the other organisations to worry about..ie. duchais,preservation societies etc. they might object…because of the new law it is difficult to even change anything on the site of a protected structure let alone the actual building.you may be lucky.

    • #718709
      James
      Participant

      Dunno about the archaeologist or engineer!!.

      It should be fairly straightforward if as you say the extension is an add-on to the existing building.

      You will definitely need planning permission for any alterations to a protected structure however the local authorities are fairly sensible in relation to allowable works in this regard – the general principle being that any new works or alterations should not adversely affect the protected structure.

      Again the local authorities take a fairly robust view as to the need to make existing residential protected structures ‘liveable’ and will be of assistance to you rather than obstructive.

      get an architect involved – preferably one with experience in this area – the RIAI will give you a list of recommended practises.

      Don’t worry about the archaeologist or engineer as its unlikey that the y are necessary as the groundworks for a new extension are not likely to exceed the existing and in any case the criteria for archaeological excavations are not pertinent to every protected structure – likewise a letter from an engineeer condemning part of a protected structure won’t be of assistance as the condemnde part might be of importance and merit retention.

      Anyway – you should’nt be put off by the listing – there are benefits such as grant aid for structural restoration works eg: roofs and windows, wall pointing, re-rendering etc. and listed houses are generally considered more desirable than their modern equivalents.

      finally – the building (no offence) sounds as if the listing is not that significant – most of the south city victorian terraces are protected structures – not for any particular merit in the individual buildings (unlike the Georgian town houses of the inner city)- but because of the urban context that they present – in short – it should’nt cause you too many problems provided that you have an architect with the relevant experience dealing with it.

      Regards

      James

      PS – my own place is list one – early georgian – rare and still has’nt bee na problem in this regard so – again – don’t be put off by the listing.

      [This message has been edited by James (edited 10 April 2002).]

    • #718712
      MichaelMac
      Participant

      Thanks a million for your help James – that’s very reassuring.

      Now you don’t happen to have any advice on how to get a seller to sell at a reasonable price . . . . !

      Michael

    • #718714
      MichaelMac
      Participant

      Sorry James,

      Just one more question. Where can I find out about out about the level of grant aid and the criteria that must be fulfilled in order to get it?

      Thanks,

      Michael

    • #718716
      James
      Participant

      Try Dublin City Council Conservation Officer.

      The general allowance is a max of £10K for half the cost of remedial works to superstructure for either weathering or structural repair purposes- roof repairs, re-pointing, new windows, repaired windows, chimney flue lining and repairs, underpinning foundations etc.

      Internal works do not qualify and you can make one application and draw one grant per year.

      Bear in mind however that funds are low and are usually given to the most ‘deserving’ causes – often buildings in a very dilapidated condition and usually list one.

      That said – grant aid will eventually be approved although probably not immediately.

      I think you are too late to benefit for 2002 but will need to apply in 2002 for grant aid in 2003.

      You will probably need to get an architects report justifying the expenditure and specifying the works and yo uwill need to have possession of a valid tax clearance certificate at time and date of draw down.

      Regards

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