Congestion Charging Dublin

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    • #709838
      missarchi
      Participant

      :confused:

      Does this make sense??? is it not better to close roads and widen footpaths
      The problem I see with this is it will encourage people to drive to suburban shopping centers which will only re-enforce the mentality and isolate the urban fringe?
      Congestion charging must also apply to urban shopping centres
      The money generated from this must be used to offer income tax reductions to people who do not have cars
      some of the money should be used to fix the price of public transport for the next decade so it will get cheaper and cheaper to use public transport in relation to inflation?
      maybe free public transport??

    • #797513
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      :confused:

      Does this make sense??? is it not better to close roads and widen footpaths
      The problem I see with this is it will encourage people to drive to suburban shopping centers which will only re-enforce the mentality and isolate the urban fringe?
      Congestion charging must also apply to urban shopping centres
      The money generated from this must be used to offer income tax reductions to people who do not have cars 300 euro???? Each business must pay an additional 600 euro for each car ect
      some of the money should be used to fix the price of public transport for the next decade so it will get cheaper and cheaper to use public transport in relation to inflation?
      maybe free public transport??

      Angled parking???? paving space to be lost ???? get real….. paying for parking is not the issue because people just go to the suburbs with free parking

      closing roads and offering alternatives is

      Irish independent

      Drivers may face charges to ease congestion

      Irish drivers could face traffic congestion charges similar to ones introduced in London by mayor Ken Livingstone
      Tools

      What are these?

      By Patricia McDonagh and Brendan Farrelly
      Thursday February 14 2008

      CITY residents could face London-style congestion charges, Taoiseach Bertie Ahern signalled yesterday.

      And they may also have to sacrifice pavement space for new parking bays as part of new Dublin City Council proposals.

      Mr Ahern told the Dail that Ireland could not continue driving “regardless, with no restrictions” as the population had now soared to 4.3m, with 2.5m vehicles on the road.

      Mr Ahern refused to be specific on congestion charges, despite repeated efforts by Labour Party leader Eamon Gilmore.

      “Do I decode what he stated as a suggestion that Dublin Corporation should introduce a congestion charge, for example? Is that the import of what he stated?” Mr Gilmore said.

      The Taoiseach stated Ireland should be the same as cities like Paris, Rome and Athens, which were “far more aggressive” and had a range of plans.

      “More imaginative proposals could be developed. There are very few park and ride facilities. In other cities these facilities are the norm and work well,” Mr Ahern said.

      The Taoiseach was pressed to explain his opinions on the thorny issue after he said “difficult decisions” lay ahead for Dublin City Council .

      These will include whether to introduce a new style of “indented” parking spaces, sacrificing pavement space to do so and costing residents €125 a year for 10 years.

      The prospect of this €1,250 parking bill for Dublin residents is raised in a report which will come before the city council’s transport committee tonight.

      There are more than 500,000 cars in Dublin, an increase of more than 40pc since 1997, the report says.

      It warns that in some areas there is not enough parking available because of a huge surge in car numbers and suggests “indented” parking spaces as a possible solution.

      Sacrificed

      This would mean that pavement space is sacrificed to create parking away from the carriageway, allowing traffic to flow more easily.

      But for this privilege residents would pay an extra €125 a year on their residential parking permit for 10 years.

      This and other suggestions to cut the problem of traffic on the capital’s clogged roads will be discussed.

      But Mr Ahern yesterday refused to be pinned down.

      He said Dublin City Council’s traffic planning committee would have to deal with these issues, similar to the way they were being dealt with in “other countries”.

      “We must face up to what other cities are dealing with sooner rather than later,” he told the Dail.

      “If we are serious about emissions and congestion, we cannot continue the way we have been, where everybody drives from A to B regardless, with no restrictions.

      “That was alright when we had 500,000 vehicles, but we have 2.5 million now.”

      – Patricia McDonagh and Brendan Farrelly

    • #797514
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It seems completely inappropriate in a city that has no effective public transport. Congestion charging in London may make more sense given that it has a very comprehensive set of alternatives i.e. underground, train and bus networks…

      Dublin City centre is not nearly as easily accessible. I’m sure it will just put money into the pockets of the likes of Dundrum, Blanchardstown, Liffey Valley etc shopping centres.

      You can’t really impose a restriction on cars accessing the city centre without providing a decent alternative first..

    • #797515
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      What a congested country we live in – population still not at 4.5 million, :rolleyes:

      approx half the population of London on its own, first congestion charge to be tackled must be the civil service car park spaces. As said above Dublin is in no position to have a London style charge.

      Good man Bertie, we should indeed have it like other European cities!:mad:

    • #797516
      admin
      Keymaster

      No but more funds should be devoted to public transport to give them an alternative.

      James Nix hit the nail on the head when he described the purchase decision for a car being something along the lines of an individual gets off an intercity train on a wet Sunday evening gets crammed into Luas and dumped in Abbey St, walks accross town to get a bus, waits in the rain for 25 minutes and vows it will never happen again; he/she has a car by Wednesday!

      Manchester is apparently quite close to introducing a charge zone; not sure if they just drive people to out of town retail or actually work

    • #797517
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Poor old Mr Aherne,he is as lost as his Governments vast retinue of “Professional” Advisors and spin-doctors.

      This report outlines with raw clarity that the Taoiseach of our little island has not got a fckking breeze about what constitutes sustainable urban policy,however Mr Aherne can take heart in the fact that none of his Urban Planners has much idea either 😎

      One only has to take into account the actions or rather lack of them of Mr Ahernes Dept of Transport…
      A Department whose self belief is so total that it can send senior officials to give evidence to a Dail committee revealing how it (the Dept) has no idea of the scale of unlicenced Public Transport operators…BECAUSE THE UNLICENCED OPERATORS WON`T TELL THEM !!

      A Department whose Senior Officers can also give evidence about spending in excess of €10 MILLION on an integrated ticketing project and ending up with NOTHING

      This crapp begins at the TOP and percolates down,resulting in a vast network of national and local politicians whose understanding of the requirements of modern urban existance amounts to ZERO.

      The very content of Mr Aherne`s little oul speech reveals the depth of understanding which the poor fella gets by with…comparisons,yet again,with London,Paris Madrid etc etc….with no commensurate committment to offer similar performing public transport systems,instead we get more flannel about Transport 22,whilst the City Council runs off foaming at the mouth in it`s desire to preserve,protect and expand on the primacy of private car ownership as THE barometer of how far we`ve come since Independence………..Independence from the beastly Brits certainly,only to beholden ourselves to the worlds steel mills and rubber plantations 🙁

      Hopefully Mr Aherne will take a Sunday Morning stroll up to DCU on Ballymun Road,with a desire to locate the Terminus for Bus Eireann`s new 109A service to Navan,launched with some ceremony by Minister for Transport Noel Dempsey last week….what he will struggle to find is any indication of where that service terminates UNLESS he closely inspects the litter bins,whereupon he will come across a sheet torn out of a timetable book stuck to a litter bin with black insulating tape….THAT is what Mr Aherne`s Transport 21 amounts to …it is what his Transport 22 will amount to because he,like his predecessors CHOOSES to treat Public Transport as some form of idealogical Lego set where they can sit and argue interminably about how awful the Transport Act 1932 is without actually bothering to familiarise themselves with some of that act`s very well crafted provisions…more valid today that when enacted 76 years ago…….Indentured Car Parking spaces My ASS 😮 😮 😮

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