bronze statues

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    • #708800
      notjim
      Participant

      so now we have another bronze statue, this time of an admiral on john richardson key. i wish we hadn’t got into this thing with bland represenational bronze statues, and dublin the city of edward delaney and oisin kelly: we used to these fantastic expressionist monuments, now we cluttering the place with crap people-in-bronze. i mean, i am pretty happy for us to commemorate joyce, behan, kavangh, phil lynott and even molly malone and this admiral guy, but where’s the art?

    • #783357
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      oh and so as not to be only moaning, isn’t it great to see the fountain on college green working, it really is a lovely thing.

    • #783358
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I haven’t noticed it – where abouts on John Rogerson Quay? Anyone have a pic?

      The Phil Lynott statue was very disappointing – oddly inanimate for such a hellraiser – it looks like something you’d win at a golf tournament …

    • #783359
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Im thinking that poor aul Thomas Moore is the only major street monument in the city in need of a spruce up now. And of course we wait with baited breath for the Anna Livia rubbish to be deposited somewhere….the much talked about Croppy Acre revamp.

    • #783360
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Messers Grattan and Moore are finally getting a cleanup. Scaffolding has gone up over the past few days.

    • #783361
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It’s more traditional statues we need,not less. Compared to other European capitals, or even other cities in general , Dublin is poor in monuments to our great people and for some reason, people that deserve a full-size statue get pawned off with a statue -or, worse, just a pathetic bust tucked away in the bushes of Merrion Square or Stephens Green

    • #783362
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I can’t agree with: it is maybe a pity we have fewer traditional statues dating from the traditional times, but those times are past and we should no more erect traditional statues than we should build victorian houses. Would you really swap the magnificent Wolfe Tone on the corner of the Green for a 6” shiny bronze modelled from paintings a la Joyce etc? And speaking of Joyce, which is the more fitting tribute, the wonderful Henry Moore in the Green or the statue on Earl St.

    • #783363
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Neither. But if there was a proper statue of Joyce on a proper plinth and not a weird little piece of kitsch that looked like an upscaled souvenir shop ornament , I’d be all for it.

    • #783364
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Grattan at the moment.

      Moore is in a similar condition on his College Street island. Both statues are badly in need of conservation work, including Grattan’s plinth which is cracking badly. What should be done as part of this job is the reinstatement in replica of the two missing seahorse lanterns, installed around 1880 but removed sometime in the mid-20th century.

      The mind boggles at their removal. Indeed, given how distinctive they are, what’s the likelihood they still exist somewhere?

    • #783365
      admin
      Keymaster

      @GrahamH wrote:

      Grattan at the moment.

      The planes really are quite big at this stage & do a fine job of obstructing the view of pretty much everything from well, pretty much everywhere.

      I notice one of the planes adjacent to the east portico of the BOI is cordoned off at the moment, looks a little unstable so perhaps will have to go. Its just one of several random jobs along this stretech that look as if they started as a sucker emerging from a crack in the pavement.

    • #783366
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @GrahamH wrote:

      God but the British did streetscapes well.

    • #783367
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Especially their ban on motorised traffic and all forms of cluttering life generally : )

      Well Grattan and Moore have both been unveiled in a remarkably short space of time. Their hoarding was erected in mid-October, and not even two weeks later it was back down again as of last weekend. It’s great to see DCC being so proactive with the city’s monuments, even with secondary statues like Moore, and Sheehan on Burgh Quay. Though to be honest it seems more a case of urgency at this stage: it’s been noted by bronze conservators that these ought to have been done years ago, and should be constantly maintained on an annual basis, and indeed more often for bird detritus. Both this and the chemical build-up on bronze in particular is quite damaging, and needs to be regularly addressed. Hopefully DCC have comitted to this. Impressively O’Connell is certainly being tended to, so top marks on that front.

      Anyway, Grattan in his cleaned glory.

      Suffice to say this gracious statue was sculpted by John Henry Foley, and erected in 1876. Apparently this site was originally intended for the Prince Albert Memorial, but was later reserved for Grattan, with Albert ending up in the RDS grounds of Leinster House.

      The execution of clothing and attention to facial detail is so characteristic of Foley’s work. Like the monuments of O’Connell Street, he now has a lusciously silky black finish.

      The blue limestone plinth was also cleaned. Alas already it has already suffered the joys of urban ‘juice’.

      Surely the most elegant plinth in the city – it’s beautifully proportioned and refinely detailed.

      The cracking has been largely left as t was. This plinth was ambitiously built with an enormous single piece of solid limestone as the centrepiece (as was the capping stone). As a result the bedding layers are becoming more evident as time goes on. Not much that can be done.

      The text was also repainted. I don’t think it was painted before the restoration, but it possibly was originally.

      All of the joints have been finely repointed with lime mortar.

      A fitting job.

      Next let’s see the trees come down, lamppost reinstatement and restoration (this time not including CFL bulbs please), and oh, an entire regeneration of College Green please!

    • #783368
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      And then we have Thomas Moore, hiding away in the foliage of his plane-infested island on College Street. In a way, his earlier weathered, gritty appearance had its own charm as an urban curiousity: little-noticed and tucked in the shadows with thousands of people passing at his feet. But the newly restored state has breathed fresh life into what was a rather tired looking monument.

      Sculpted by Christopher Moore in the 1850s, it’s a typically wooden mid-Victorian monument atop an equally lifeless heavy granite base. Nonetheless, I think the restoration has revealed some charming detail that gives it a better press as it were. The transformation on condition and patina alone is remarkable.

      Beautiful.

      Again before and after below. The cleaning has brought a renewed depth of character and expression to the statue, particularly the face. There’s no changing that mechanical stance though!
      It really was in an appalling condition.

      A remarkable difference.

      And unlike Grattan and Foley’s other work, this statue has a wonderful seaweed-green glow to it in direct sunlight.

      The plinth has also been cleaned. Granite tends not to be that impressive when freshened up – indeed it’s almost nicer dirty. The dark patches at the corners of the steps seem to be where the timber posts of the hoarding were standing. Presumably they’ll come back to them. Nonetheless they give an idea as to the change in appearance.

      Notably not all pollution was removed. Either it was decided only to use a mild abrasive, or the soiling was too tough too remove without damaging the stone. In this before and after picture, the white box just notes one example of stubborn dirt remaining, You can see much more evident examples to the top and left, and very noticably on the earlier picture above.

    • #783369
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      More here.

      Better result here.

      Given how robust granite is, and this being relatively new, it’s surprising the cleaning wasn’t a little more severe. Still, the shadows are largely unnoticable and it is probably better to be cautious.

      Nice texture with granite as always.

      Beautifully crisp date and manufacterer stamp facing Trinity.

      Elkingtons were the leading manufacturers of bronze statues in Britian in the 19th century. There’s a great paragraph on the link below that explains exactly how the likes of Moore would have been precisely and accurately cast from the artist’s original.

      http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/speel/otherart/elkingtn.htm

      As probably seen earlier, Christopher Moore’s mark is located on the other side of the plinth facing Westmoreland Street. C. Moore Sculp

      Another fine addition to the city’s increasingly restored monumental collection 🙂

    • #783370
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      So, if we were to add new statues in Dublin, who would they be of?

      Is there a DeValera one yet? He seems like an obvious candidate. Nelson Mandela (well, they do have 2 statues of him in London). Mother Teresa?

      I wouldn’t be surprised to see a U2 statue, sometime in the future.

    • #783371
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Well Beckett obviously deserves something, but please please no bronze statues cartoonishly exaggerating his famously lined face and please please god no statues of him peeking out a bin which wouldn’t surprise me given the current taste for tat. Pity Giacommoti isn’t alive to do his tree in bronze, maybe a speaker somewhere endlessly playing Not I?

      PS The cryptic pixel board in TCD visible from the DART approaching Pease Station is actually a Beckett memorial and there is a plaque on the anemometer on Dun Laoir..etc pier, any others?

    • #783372
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @Blisterman wrote:

      So, if we were to add new statues in Dublin, who would they be of?

      Is there a DeValera one yet? He seems like an obvious candidate. Nelson Mandela (well, they do have 2 statues of him in London). Mother Teresa?

      I wouldn’t be surprised to see a U2 statue, sometime in the future.

      It will surprise no one that , with my user name , that I would like to see a replica of the one and only Rory Galagher . Sure, we have a replica of his guitar in Temple Bar …. but this is not enough for me 🙂

    • #783373
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @sinnerboy wrote:

      It will surprise no one that , with my user name , that I would like to see a replica of the one and only Rory Galagher . Sure, we have a replica of his guitar in Temple Bar …. but this is not enough for me 🙂

      Here, Here !

      And let’s have him on a high plinth.

    • #783374
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      How about William Rowan Hamilton?

    • #783375
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      There is a statue outside Government buildings, by the front door, quite a nice one in white marble.

    • #783376
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I never knew that, now, thanks for the info. OK, how about W.B.Yeats and Flann O’Brien.

    • #783377
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Isn’t the Henry Moore in Stephen’s Green a Yeats memorial: I mistakenly gave it to Joyce above, but thinking about it, it must be Yeats.

    • #783378
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Fair enough, But I think a memorial that can be instantly identified as the poet would be a good idea, and in a more public place too. Why not some statues in Smithfield?

    • #783379
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Well we could have a series of memorials to writers along the edge of Parnell Sq leading to the writers museum, but please god, by competition with a decent budget and no expectation that they will be bronze statues.

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