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    • #710183
      Paul Clerkin
      Keymaster

      A website which provides the official Irish language names of almost 100,000 towns, streets and post offices throughout the country has been officially launched.

      The site, http://www.logainm.ie, is aimed at students, teachers, journalists, translators and others who need the authoritative Irish form of place names.

      The Bunachar Logainmneacha na hÉireann is also designed to be of interest to people worldwide who want to know more about the heritage, culture and geography of Ireland.
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      Visitors to the site can play sound files of the pronunciation of place names in Cos Waterford, Galway and Donegal.

      Many of the place names are also accompanied by scanned archival records from the Place names Branch of the Department of Community, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs.

      The site also contains a facility to translate lists of place names to and from Irish.

      http://www.logainm.ie/

    • #803676
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Tá sin ar fheabhas, ach beadh se i bhfad nios fear mas beadh stair na haiteanna ainsin fresin….

    • #803677
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Little off topic, but what on earth is the point of the Luas in Dublin, calling out the Irish names of each station it stops at?

      Is there anyone out there who regularly calls places in Dublin by their Irish Language name?

      If there are, how many out of them, have no idea of the English Language names for places?

      Further more, if by some remote possibility that there a handful of people like this out there, how many of them are vision impared and can’t read the signs at the stations, nesessitating audio guidance?

      It’s nothing but tokenism.

    • #803678
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Wrong, Blisterman, it’s quaint, charming and romantic and – by the way – your first national language. And etymology isn’t a skin disease.

    • #803679
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @johnglas wrote:

      Wrong, Blisterman, it’s quaint, charming and romantic and – by the way – your first national language. And etymology isn’t a skin disease.

      I don’t fully agree about the charm of makey-uppy literal semantic translations of names which always were English. If you have to provide an Irish “version” it should be based on a phonetics, in my opinion. That’s the way most of the English versions of Irish place names came about.

      In some parts of the country, the English language has been dominant for nearly a millenium. It is hardly surprising that it would leave it’s mark in the form of placenames. Why retro-fit an invented Irish name to a place that was given its name by English speakers?

      Along the same lines, I remember an unfortunate child of English parents in school with the surname Butterfield. Like everyone else, he was given an “Irish” name. I don’t know whether teachers use a standard for Gaelicising names but he ended up being called something like “Gort na hIm” (i.e. “field of butter”). Hmm.. now that I think about it I’m not sure that “Buitefíld” would have been much better. 😀 Thankfully I’ve a proper Irish surname.

      A futher digression; is Dublin/(Baile) Átha Cliath is the only “dual” language place name? I.e. in the sense of the two names having no relationship, phonetic or semantic? Though I’m not sure where “Dubh Linn” fits in here.

    • #803680
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      jimq: points taken; yes, the ‘Dublin/Baile Atha Cliath/Dubh Linn’ is a real linguistic teaser. It seems that literary Irish is too rigid in form, while English is more flexible and adaptable. But I still like hearing the Irish names spoken on Luas, and life’s too short to be bothered about such a tiny matter anyway. Maybe we’ll get Belfast trams with English, Irish and ‘Ulster Scots’, with IRKP doing the voice-over for the last.

    • #803681
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @johnglas wrote:

      Wrong, Blisterman, it’s quaint, charming and romantic and – by the way – your first national language. And etymology isn’t a skin disease.

      Buíochas, níl ach aineolas é nuair deir daoine rudaí mar thar (blisterman)… tá an teanga seo chomh tabhactach do an chuid daoine sa tír, agus an cathair seo. Ní bhíonn cultúr faoi practiciúlacht ach aithne. Ní dheannann sé aon dochar, faic ach maith… fág é. Ar an ábhar, smaointe maith é.:p

    • #803682
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @Blisterman wrote:

      Is there anyone out there who regularly calls places in Dublin by their Irish Language name?

      Believe it or not, there are more fluent Irish speakers in Dublin than the Gaeltachtaí combined. And yes, Irish language street names are used extensively by Irish speakers in Dublin.

      Further more, if by some remote possibility that there a handful of people like this out there, how many of them are vision impared and can’t read the signs at the stations, nesessitating audio guidance?

      That wasn’t really a question, was it? I get the feeling that you perhaps dislike seeing or hearing the Irish language in the public realm, but the fact remains that the language is enshrined in our constitution, and citizens who speak that language are equally entitled to see and hear public notices in that language, be it in Dublin or Dingle.

      It’s nothing but tokenism.

      I agree with you on this and I believe that Irish signage and announcements should come before English. See Catalonia, Valencia, Basque Country and Galicia – even though these regions are predominantly Spanish-speaking, their governments place their respective languages First in the public realm. Ireland is no different – we are trying to preserve what little is left of our culture.

      Of course, it all comes down to the disastrous education system. Many Irish people feel “robbed” after 12 years of mind-numbing Irish classes, and now without the means to string a simple sentence together. Had you received a proper education i nGaeilge, you would perhaps have had a more positive view towards the language.

      Le dea-mhéin,
      Morlan

    • #803683
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @ihateawake wrote:

      Buíochas, níl ach aineolas é nuair deir daoine rudaí mar thar (blisterman)… tá an teanga seo chomh tabhactach do an chuid daoine sa tír, agus an cathair seo. Ní bhíonn cultúr faoi practiciúlacht ach aithne. Ní dheannann sé aon dochar, faic ach maith… fág é. Ar an ábhar, smaointe maith é.:p

      @djasmith wrote:

      Tá sin ar fheabhas, ach beadh se i bhfad nios fear mas beadh stair na haiteanna ainsin fresin….

      ‘Fear an Spuaic’… Nach é an díol trua é?!

      Ach bhuel, tá sé go híontach a fheicáil cúpla daoine anseo ag cáint inár dteanga. Cárbh as sibh.. an Pháil nó áit eile..?

    • #803684
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @Morlan wrote:

      ‘Fear an Spuaic’… Nach é an díol trua é?!

      😀 Ait go deimhin, sé níos measa ná mo ainm…

      Is as Áth Cliath mé, Luas dátheangach ftw.
      Aontaím leat, ba chóir an ghaeilge a bheith fógairthe i dtús:cool:

    • #803685
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      @Morlan wrote:

      I agree with you on this and I believe that Irish signage and announcements should come before English. See Catalonia, Valencia, Basque Country and Galicia – even though these regions are predominantly Spanish-speaking, their governments place their respective languages First in the public realm. Ireland is no different – we are trying to preserve what little is left of our culture.

      Well, that’s kind of my point. They don’t for example have voiceovers in Catalan, on the public transport in Madrid.
      I’ve no problem with it, in Gaeltacht areas, where the language is actually in use, on a day to day basis.

      With regards to your claim that there are more fluent Irish speakers in Dublin than the Gaeltacht, I’d like to know how many of them actually use it as their first language.
      I’ve heard German, Polish, French, Spanish, Chinese, Nigerian, Romanian and Arabic being spoken around Dublin, far more times, than I’ve heard Irish.

    • #803686
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      It may be hard to accept that you are not the barometer of irish language appreciation and competency. People tend to use their primary language, for most here, that is english… so what? Its hard to breake the mould. That does not give any indication of the opinions and abilities of irish people regarding their language.

      What the hell is the problem you have with it being announced on the luas? Why not? The more prevalent the langauge the better… we should aim to protect our culture rather than dismiss and neglect it, ANY evolved society should, wales is a good example. The more the irish language is integrated with society, the stronger it becomes. Its not the case that we should have one language and thats it, bilingualism is functional and even projects a sense of education… Im ranting now, but I dont understand your opposition to a language, why so bitter?

    • #803687
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Bhueil nuair a usaidim an teaga i rith an lae, sa siopa, ar an bus no do na gardai (smaonaigh ar sin), ni bionn siad abalta aon rud a ra air ais dom (sin cleas maith nuair a stopann na gardai do car!). Ta an ceart ag johnglas, is e an gaeilge ar cead teanga sa tir seo, agus mas bhuil daoine mi-shasta leis sin caithfidh siad rudai a deanamh faoi sin.

      Agus ar a t-abhar faoi an gaeilge ar ‘Baile Atha Cliath’ no ‘Dubh Linn’, caitfidh tu feach ar ais trid do stair, no ar an leabhar ‘Dublin Street Names’ le Paul Clerkin. Beidh an stair ceart soilear tar eis sin. Agus ar na hainmeacha ar an Luas, bhuil b’fheidir go fhoghlaionn na daoine ar an luas rudai as sin. Ma fheacann tu ar na hainmeacha sin, ta tu abalta a lan stair a thog as.

      Agus rud amhain eile – do na gaelgoiri ar an leathanach seo – ta bron orm faoi mo gramadach! Ta se chomh maith le cac-bho. ta bhron orm!

      ar aghaidh leis na diospoireachta!

      ** Just to add – for the people who seem totally oppossed to the language – In one sense after travelling the world I agree – what is the use in it. Wouldn’t it be much more useful to learn French or German or something….. However I still respect that Irish is an amazing language, and so many aspects of it make sense (anyone who says english does have a lot to argue). The language even it’s present form that is being spoken on the streets of Dublin is not proper Irish. So many of the place names on our street signs display bad grammer. On my own road there are 2 signs, one at either end, each giving a different irish to the road…..

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