Re: Re: well what about the developments popping up in the shannonside ?

Home Forums Ireland well what about the developments popping up in the shannonside ? Re: Re: well what about the developments popping up in the shannonside ?

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Anonymous
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Limerick Leader wrote:
Questions are raised over 12 areas left out of county plan

MORE than a dozen County Limerick villages have not been included as designated development locations in the County Development Plan.

Deputy Dan Neville said that this meant that people who wished to build houses in these centres will be refused unless they satisfed the rules relating to open rural areas. That means that only local rural persons or returned locals would be considered, he said.

He also said that he failed to see how the planners had decided on where was in and where was out.

“I know of one applicant who wanted to build on a site between a school and a church, and directly across the road from a community centre, but was refused,” he said. “I welcome the inclusion of Kilcornan, but why not Ballysteen, with a church, a school, a post office and playing facilities?

“Croagh is in and I welcome the developments there, but why not Kilfinny? Athlacca is included, but not Dromin. Strand is in, but Monagea is out,” he said. He listed other villages which, he said, should be encouraged to develop. These included Granagh, Grange, Coolcappa and Kilcolman, Colmanswell, Bulgaden and Martinstown, Effin, Rockhill, Cappagh, Cloncagh and Manister.

Deputy Neville said that maps of the more than 80 villages which had been included in the plan had had boundaries shown which indicated the planners’ preferred development area in each case.

He called on the county manager, Ned Gleeson, to bring a motion before Council to reinstate those places which had been regarded as recognised villages until now, and to actively promote suitable residential and other development in them. “It is the policy of all councils and is that of the Minister to encourage village development, such a at Croagh, to ensure the viability of the church, shop, school, sporting and other facilities,” said Deputy Neville.

The Council’s chief planner, Jimmy Feane, said that the indication of settlement boundaries in villages was a new departure, and was quite in keeping with Council policy to encourage the development of villages.

“We identified those places which already had the nucleus of a settlement in which people might be encouraged to live]

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