Re: Re: Welcome to Ireland’s ugly urban sprawl

Home Forums Ireland Welcome to Ireland’s ugly urban sprawl Re: Re: Welcome to Ireland’s ugly urban sprawl

#748710
Anonymous
Participant

@Mob79 wrote:

True, it can be seen as insulting, but you can’t deny the place is being swallowed up in housing estates and retail parks. there’s no big plan and the place is turning into a suburban wasteland. As said in the article you’d think we’d learn from the mistakes made in the UK but we just follow along.

I think there are three Schools of thought in play here, those who read the hype of the article and have written its authors off as the looney left without examining the facts they had assembled. And with that writing style it wasn’t too difficult to do.

The second school of thought has looked at the facts and not really considered the prose style which is quite frankly terrible and destroys a good piece of research.

Mob79 has hit it for me, there is no grand plan like there is in most developed nations, the three major points that are made are correct. Firstly you can expect that same chance of a planning permission for a one off house whether it has been designed by DeBlacham & Maher into context or whether you have downloaded one the of ‘Irish House Design’ packages and had an engineer sign it off.

Secondly the M3 cutting through the SKreen Valley close to the Hill of Tara an archaelogical area of World significance, there are two points on this firstly the EIS flagged another possible route on the other side of the Hill of Skreen which would have had significantly less impact. The cost benefit analysis of the M3 in relation to other transport projects is also highly questionable, the M3 does not serve any major population centres, but will in reality service hundreds of acres of low density sprawl along its route.

Thirdly the Carrickmines fiasco, the reality about carrickmines is simple, an important national monument was leveled not because it was obstructing a Motorway but because the DOE refused to move a roundabout by 400 metres, this roundabout was not moved because its present position suited the entrance of Dublins biggest retail warehousing park.

To dismiss all of these points as not true and not relevant would be an error and to present them in style adopted was also a mistake. Ireland needs to start adopting some real central planning and stop granting ad-hoc planning decisions to low density development of poor design quality.

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