Re: Re: Irish say no to PVC windows

Home Forums Ireland Irish say no to PVC windows Re: Re: Irish say no to PVC windows

#744930
GrahamH
Participant

That advertisment you posted above Devin is truly unbelievable – before and after indeed! :rolleyes: 😮
That single little square from a newspaper captures in a nutshell what is contained in nearly ten pages of material here, and what is happening across the country to our older building stock.
Living breathing heritage replaced with an idealised, synthetic version of what is deemed to be ‘traditional’.
This in particular is the sickest example yet come across:

I noted this exact phenomenon you mention of derelict buildings in towns and villages in Ballymore Eustace recently. The townland surrounding the village of course coming down with new development (though seemingly more controlled than other parts of the country), while there’s about six derelict 19th century houses and buildings coming into the village and in the village itself. The largest of which, a two storey house with extensive frontage near the village centre (about the size of the two buildings above), is proposed to be demolished and replaced with a humdrum two storey development, to include a medical/doctor’s surgery.
No doubt ‘what about the children’ tactics are being thrown about as we speak.

There is way too much focus in the media on getting people back into Dublin city to live. Getting developers to build family units in the capital is bad enough, but in regional towns and villages it’s almost non-existant – especially villages. This should be the real focus of environmental and planning journalism. It’s a massive problem. Dublin is just constantly used as a token example, which in itself is damaging as it reinforces the widespread perception that Dublin is the only urban area in Ireland – everywhere else is just ‘the countryside’, even with major regional towns and villages.

And so these places are left to crumble as the estates and one-offs capture new territory elsewhere. The doughnut effect could not be more apt a description for what is happen in regional urban Ireland, only the part that is most often forgotton about, the hole, is particularly relevant to many Irish urban centres. There’s nothing in the middle.

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