Re: Re: Dublin’s Bicycle Clutter

Home Forums Ireland Dublin’s Bicycle Clutter Re: Re: Dublin’s Bicycle Clutter

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Anonymous
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@Frank Taylor wrote:

Garda traffic corps would be wrong to prioritise low risk over high risk activities.

Based on talking to a few dozen Gardai this is the situation: for a Garda to prosecute a cyclists for a minor offence he would have to issue a summons. This would require a day in court. There is also problem of actually obtaining a valid ID at the time of the offence or failing that requiring a cyclists to accompany the Garda to the station. In other words the situation as it stands is a farce. Who on earth would want the entire dwindling Garda force tied up court dealing with cyclists.

The people to blame are those tasked with running the city. If there is a problem then it should reflect the nature of the offence. Controlling cyclists in regard to cycling in pedestrian areas and on footpaths should be in the hands of cycle wardens or it should just be legalised. To put this in context, today I watched a group of people dealing drugs on a city street in broad daylight. Two uniformed Gardai walked by them. One guy flung the bag of tabs under a car. The two Gardai just kept going.

@Frank Taylor wrote:

97 people have been killed on Irish roads this year but just one (in Limerick city) was a cyclist. That incident was a collision between a cyclist and a car and we don’t yet know who was at fault.
Many more people are cycling in Dublin now. Many of the 5,000 ‘Dublin bikes’ trips undertaken are by inexperienced cyclists. Yet far fewer cyclists are being killed. So this is not the area to prioritise.

The figure last quoted in the Independent for people cycling into Dublin was 20,000 per day. Given the continuing increase in cyclists combined with the badly maintained roads, badly designed or absent cycle lanes and total lack of regulation and training do you think it’s more likely that one or more cyclists are going to be killed or injured?

@Frank Taylor wrote:

Laws should of course be enforced but it would be wrong to direct resources in an inefficient manner. Cyclists present a danger to themselves more than they endanger other people. The primary purpose of the gardai is to protect citizens from other people, not from themselves. Education is probably a better approach.

The first people I contacted were cycling interests and those who appear to represent cycling. At first some suggested showing the photos as a cycling education slideshow. That would be fine by me. As the picture broadened and the evidence mounted the replies started to die off and then just about stopped all together.

Incidentally the reason for using still photos and blocking out the faces of the cyclists were based on advice by a friend in the Garda. By doing it in that manner no cyclists could be identified and even if they were the fact that it’s a still photo means it’s not evidence of movement and therefore can’t be the basis of a prosecution. It’s not about the individual cyclists it’s more so about the people who should be running the city.

I still think, as unlikely as it seems, that the only way cyclists behaviour will change is for cyclist to take it upon themselves to make it happen. In this country I wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for the powers that be to catch up.

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