Trinity College Dublin

Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Thu Jul 23, 2009 9:41 am

fergalr wrote: I don't know why they don't boot the changing rooms out of the bottom of the building and use all that room for more bar space.
Ah, the Pav. Best pub in the world on a late summer's afternoon.


I think the DUCAC who represent the sports clubs and run the Pav are quite keen on the idea that it's is a Pavilion and not a bar; they are probably right, it would loose some of its charm if it ceased to have a mixed function. The refurbishment and extension will increase the amount of changing room space as I understand it.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Thu Jul 23, 2009 11:37 pm

I don't know why those large paving stones are being laid, as not only do they look awful, they are not what permission was granted for. As Frank says, smaller paving units would be far more appropriate, integrating better with the fine grain of existing cobbles and setts.

Initially, Trinity applied for permission for the below scheme, drafted as a compromise between plans for greater and lesser numbers of pathways as discussed over the course of four years of consultation. As can be seen, the design included diagonal cross paths in Parliament Square which were considered by the case planner to be inharmonious with the rectilinear character of the enclosure, the buildings, and how they relate with each other. It was also felt that the paths were too numerous.

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Otherwise considered an acceptable solution to resolving the problems of accessibility, the principal condition of granting permission was the omission of the diagonal paths and their replacement with a horizontal path connecting the Chapel and Examination Hall. A good compromise.

This proposal that was granted permission proposed the use of modern square granite setts of 100mm x 100mm, with edges and bays marked by 100mm x 200mm setts. It is difficult to understand, therefore, why large slabs of granite are being laid as test patches.

In any event, one would have to wonder why tightly knitted traditional setts, as they are supposed to be laid, cannot be used as a wheelchair surface. Why cannot pathways of the quality of the Foster Place setted surface, indeed even better, be laid? A slightly flatter stone, coupled with a vertical bonding pattern and tight laying, would surely provide a sufficiently flat surface?

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A wheelchair pathway concept was successfully incorporated by the OPW into their new paving of the Upper Yard at Dublin Castle c. 1996, in this case used to architectural effect, drawing attention to the axial alignment of the entrance to the State Apartments with the Bedford Tower opposite.

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A different context to Trinity though, as the roughly square-cut stones used here have a hard, structural quality, unlike the organic assemblage of cobbles in Front Square which require a softer treatment. Trinity also requires pavement widths capable of accommodating two passing chairs. In any event, the Upper Yard's paving was a grievous mistake, as not only are the 'cobbles' barely one step above hardcore - the salvaged off-casts of provincial British cities' tramlines if I recall - nastily laid in a pool of cement, and a nightmare to walk over, they also forever changed the regal character of the Yard, with its elegant compacted earth and gravel surface, which had never been cobbled in its 300 year history. A compacted surface of fawn-coloured earth and fine gravel traversed with pathways would have been fabulous. Such a crying shame.

Anyway, we'll see how Trinity pans out.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Tue Aug 04, 2009 9:41 pm

Sadly the tree by the Nassau St entrance is diseased and will be felled:

"It is with regret that Trinity College Dublin has been obliged to fell the Horse Chestnut tree at the entrance to the Arts Building on Nassau Street. The tree has undergone extensive examinations conducted by two different experts and a serious fungal disease was identified which now necessitates the removal of the tree for safety reasons. The College regrets this decision however it has been obliged to take this course of action due to the potential danger it may pose to the public.
As a result the Nassau Street Entrance will be closed until 6.00pm on Sunday August 9th. The Gardai will manage any necessary traffic diversions on Nassau Street during the works. Access to the west end of College during this time will be maintained via the College’s Front Gate. Normal Sunday access arrangements will resume at 6.00pm when Front Gate will close and the Nassau Street Entrance will re-open.
The Horse Chestnut, which was planted in the late 1870s in the area known as the Fellows’ Garden, was retained in the Arts Building development when it was completed in 1978. The tree has served as a meeting place and a landmark for that time. The College’s Grounds & Gardens Committee is currently seeking a suitable replacement tree species for the site.
“There are currently six hundred trees on Trinity College’s Campus which contribute to an atmosphere that enhances study as well as the biodiversity of the city. We value and care for them all,” said TCD’s Facilities Officer, Noel McCann. "

http://www.tcd.ie/Communications/news/news.php?headerID=1250&vs_date=2009-08-05
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Tue Aug 04, 2009 9:58 pm

A well-detailed, nicely written public interest communique from a public body - now there's a first!

This is a shame, even if it is a tree more famous for its trunk than its canopy. Perhaps if the trunk was left in place, nobody would actually notice the rest of the tree had been chopped down...

For a second there I thought it was the Grafton Street corner under question - phew, heart failure rewind please.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby missarchi » Tue Aug 04, 2009 10:02 pm

I know 300 x 300 tiles are cheaper to lay maybe that's your answer?
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Thu Aug 06, 2009 11:25 am

BRL hoping to win TCD student accommodation for Ballymun; from today's times.


"BALLYMUN COULD be the location of a new Trinity College “student village” if Dublin City Council’s regeneration company is successful in a bid to build accommodation for the university.

Trinity College is seeking tenders for a 1,000-bed accommodation campus within a 2.5km or 30-minute rush-hour commute of the university’s main buildings in Dublin city centre.

Ballymun Regeneration Ltd (BRL), the company set up by the city council to manage the redevelopment of the city’s largest social housing flat complex, is seeking to form a consortium to bid to build the campus.

BRL managing director Ciarán Murray said the company had a number of sites on the Ballymun Road and in the Ballymun Business Park near the M50, which would be suitable for student housing.

“Ballymun offers a huge opportunity for the consolidation of all Trinity’s future needs in terms of the creation of a student village, not only providing accommodation but integrated sports, leisure and cultural facilities,” Mr Murray said.

While Trinity is initially seeking accommodation for 1,000 students, Ballymun had the capacity to house a much larger student village with accommodation for several thousand undergraduates and postgraduate students, he said.

Ballymun is more than 7km from Dublin’s city centre, but Mr Murray said dedicated bus lanes make it a 10-15 minute journey from Trinity and the planned metro station would be just five stops away from the university."

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2009/0806/1224252081783.html
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby ac1976 » Thu Aug 06, 2009 11:53 am

notjim wrote:BRL hoping to win TCD student accommodation for Ballymun; from today's times.


"BALLYMUN COULD be the location of a new Trinity College “student village” if Dublin City Council’s regeneration company is successful in a bid to build accommodation for the university.


http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2009/0806/1224252081783.html


I think it's a bit odd that there is a criteria of being within a short commute, but that there is no criteria to be within a short cycling commute. Surely it would make sense to locate the student accomodation within up to 15min (4km) cycling commute? Ballymun is 7km from TCD.
[the 4km 15min suggestion is my own cycling threashold after which I would need to shower]
And there should be criteria to provide secure cycle parking etc in the student accomodation.
And its DCC who's idea it is, aren't they supposed to be promoting sustainable living and promoting cycling? Students are an ideal group of people to target, if you do it right.

Anyway Ballymun is far better suited to accomodate students from DCU and the other collages in the area (Coolock Raheny etc) which are so much closer.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Thu Aug 06, 2009 1:17 pm

Trinity is terrible about cycling; the cycle stands are awful, when your bike gets robbed the porters are completely uninterested and, in fact, cycle parking is the responsibility of the students union, I wrote once to ask if that meant the SU also had responsibility for car parking, but apparently not.

At the moment they seem to be adding stanley stands under the DART line, which is good but not much; surely it would be worth having some sort of repair workshop on campus, oh, you know subsidized out of a car parking fee, it is a continual irritation to me that car parking is a free perk, subsidizing poor commuting habits.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby jdivision » Thu Aug 06, 2009 2:43 pm

I'd expect the Glass bottle site in Ringsend will be chosen, long standing connections between Trinity and McNamara
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Thu Aug 06, 2009 3:30 pm

I thought that too; but there are also rumours about that in connection with the joint project with UCD.

As for the connection with McNamara, I am enjoying the new McNamara Professor of engineering, he is extremely active and seems to be building up a substantial group very fast and gets extra marks for being the first person to treat one of the Westland Row houses with any sort of respect.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Denton » Sun Aug 09, 2009 6:44 pm

I spent a lot of the past year on campus and i have to say i have many gripes with some of the building's internal layouts around campus, the arts block being the worst.


I used to mildly hate the arts block now i think its offensive to the mind let alone the eyes. Try navigating it in a hurry? It's a nightmare. When helping out for debates for the Hist or The Phill sometimes they hold debates in the tiny classrooms of upper floors in the arts block, good luck finding them! It's a concrete maze of identicle dark sections. It's scary how badly sign posted it is and how dark it is. It's nothing but carpet and concrete.


I could go on for hours, but basically it's student moniker of "THe soviet bomb shelter" is apropriate.



Luce hall despite being an eye soar is a nice space, but it's mainly used for squash and exams and 1 office for the Learning Development services. IT really needs a face lift and a paint job. Maybe even stick LED lights on the outside or something, like that german football stadium.

It will be nice when it becomes a student space because there's plenty of space in there.



I am certainly biast but The GMB is one of my favourite buildings on campus. Its grand scale and space is very welcoming. Its just a pitty its so cold in winter.

It has had a few questionable internal changes over the years. The new stairs at the top after the fire don't quiet fit in but they serve a purpose.

Also the new front desk in the foyer appears to be made of MDF which is appalling. Compared to the shack that was there it's an improvement but being exposed i don't think it's much of an improvement.


I have a few other gripes and loves of campus but for the moment i'll leave them be.


Also my faculty has the best building, The GAS building on D'Olier Street. No question:p
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:59 pm

GrahamH wrote:For the flagship institution in the city and arguably its number one visited attraction to have its fenestration-heavy facade compromised by windows in an advanced state of deterioration, and in some cases decay, is simply unacceptable.


Well I'm glad to report that matters are finally progressing in respect of the West Front, with repainting of all its windows underway for a number of weeks now. The previous process of removal and 'reconditioning' of sashes has been abandoned in favour of a basic in-situ painting of the joinery. This appears to be on foot of the halting of the previous works, where it was uncovered that large amounts of historic glass was being broken to facilitate the refurbishment.

Now a painting - and presumably a prior sanding and cleaning - with an (apparent single) coat of Dulux Solo white is the order of the day. Not exactly going to win a Europa Nostra any time soon, but a careful job is being conducted nonetheless.

Image



Image

The difference between the earlier reconditioned sashes and these simply painted ones is notable - the former sharp with crisp painted edges and glazing bars, the latter (as seen above) more wonky, if also more charming.


Before

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After

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The southern end (below) is now well in hand. Soon this grotty scene - where some of the joinery has no paint left on it at all - will be no more.

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The difference a coat of paint makes (may need to refresh page for effect).

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Some of the truly fabulous crowns of c. 1758. It's quite rare you can catch this view: just a few minutes with a very specific evening sky.

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Anyway, it's all coming together. The painter is getting through about five windows a day - no mean feat. Unlike most of us who stand back to admire the newly decorated boxroom wall, it must be pretty darn satisfying to lay claim to painting the entire West Front of Trinity College!

Image
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Sat Sep 19, 2009 12:49 am

Capital Bars, including the Trinity Capital, have gone into examinership: I hope the college has the good sense to make an offer for the Trinity Capital; what a fantastic opportunity!

On the other hand I hope the bars survive, it is hard not to like Cafe en Seine and Zanzibar and the George is an institution, Break for the Border we could do without.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Sun Sep 20, 2009 1:40 pm

. . . and according to the Post the examiner is going to sell the hotels to save the pubs. Oh please buy the Trinity Capital TCD!
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby foremanjoe » Sun Sep 20, 2009 1:59 pm

notjim wrote:On the other hand I hope the bars survive, it is hard not to like Cafe en Seine and Zanzibar and the George is an institution, Break for the Border we could do without.


It's quite easy not to like Café en Seine, especially when you stick out your hand to collect your change, only to find that the barman is also sticking out his hand waiting for the extra few quid that you owe for your pint.

Is the George an institution? I thought it was just a gay bar. I suppose if it qualifies as an institution then so does the Parnell Mooney, for it is to the hard (and crooked) nosed, rough as old boots, cider-injecting scumbags that drink there what the George is to the gay community.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Sun Sep 20, 2009 2:43 pm

The Parnell Mooney is most certainly an institution and, as for Cafe en Seine, how else do you think they pay for their huge planters and over-size lighting features, but let's not go off topic.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Global Citizen » Sun Sep 20, 2009 10:24 pm

I hope Café en Seine shuts.
It was an overpriced craptrap frequented by celtic tiger bullshiters.
All pretending they were in France.

It was never a proper pub.

A bit like the bars on Rue St. Denis in Paris.
Lots of Irish pubs there full of French folk pretending they are in Dublin.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Mon Sep 21, 2009 2:48 am

Global Citizen wrote:I hope Café en Seine shuts.
It was an overpriced craptrap frequented by celtic tiger bullshiters.
All pretending they were in France.

It was never a proper pub.

A bit like the bars on Rue St. Denis in Paris.
Lots of Irish pubs there full of French folk pretending they are in Dublin.


You're right. What makes a city great is limiting itself to indigenous culture. We should shut down the Italian and Indian restaurants and the Swedish massage parlours while we're at it.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Mon Sep 21, 2009 3:42 am

There are Swedish massage parlours: do tell! I also seemed to have different experience of the Rue St. Denis to the inaptly named Global Citizen; I appear to have have mistook the French folk pretending to be Dubliners for male prostitutes!

Either way, lets stick to our topic: I know I started it, but really it was by accident and despite my recent retreat from my former wide ranging thread bossiness, I still hope to protect this topicness here.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby foremanjoe » Mon Sep 21, 2009 11:25 am

Screw the topic, Swedish massage parlours? Where?

And the only thing remotely french about Café en Seine is the name.
The prevalent culture endorsed there is that of Celtic Tiger Ireland, which in recent times has been unmasked to show its true qualities- tackiness and narcissism.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby jdivision » Mon Sep 21, 2009 3:57 pm

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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby gunter » Fri Oct 30, 2009 8:08 pm

They have a picture of the 'Long Room Hub' on the hoarding now,

Image

. . . . what do ye think?
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Yixian » Sat Oct 31, 2009 5:06 pm

Cafe en Seine is at least well decorated, you can't deny it looks beautiful. All that needs to change is the pricing.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby fergalr » Sat Oct 31, 2009 7:49 pm

gunter wrote:They have a picture of the 'Long Room Hub' on the hoarding now,

Image

. . . . what do ye think?


I didn't know the Department of Finance Building on Merrion Row had pupped.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby missarchi » Sat Oct 31, 2009 9:56 pm

this must be a joke...
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