university of limerick

Re: university of limerick

Postby mitchell » Sun Mar 15, 2009 8:01 pm

I'm in the languages building a few times a week, If I remember to take a few pics ill put them up.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Mar 28, 2009 7:51 pm

Lero (Irish Software Engineering Research Centre) / IEC (Industrial Enterprise Centre Development)

Planning Permission 09353

A 5 storey building for Lero/IEC, with a total floor area of 3,786sqm to accommodate offices, lecture and research laboratory facilities, associated site works. New access road located NW of the proposed site, serving existing buildings and existing car parking facilities. An additional 60 car parking spaces to be provided through extension of existing car parking facilities to the south of the new building and extension of the western car park, including associated paths and landscape (the site is located circa 300m from Plassey House (a protected structure) and 350m from Plassey Mill and Headrace (a protected structure). The University of Limerick falls within an Architectural Conservation Area)
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue May 26, 2009 3:32 pm

Work to begin on University of Limerick Medical School (Limerick Leader)

CONSTRUCTION work on UL's Medical School will begin this year, Minister for Education Batt O'Keeffe confirmed this morning.
Making the announcement, Minister O'Keeffe said: 'Building work is expected to get under way shortly on the new multi-million euro 4,000sq/m project."

It is expected that the project will generate about 150 construction jobs.

"The new medical school, which will accommodate up to 288 graduate students, will have dedicated laboratories, facilities and equipment located in the university's "health education village" where physical resources can be shared.

"UL is now tendering for a contractor to build the project and construction is expected to be finished by the end of next year.

"UL's medical school has been operating since 2007 and this new building will, for the first time, provide dedicated facilities for graduates to train in medicine on the campus.

"The medical school, which last year attracted 50 full-time graduate students for the four-year programme, will target innovative learning and provide space and courses for general practitioner training.

"The school is expected to offer new post-graduate research programmes when it's fully operational," said Minister O'Keeffe.

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Re: university of limerick

Postby jimg » Tue May 26, 2009 7:20 pm

Without being negative, I can't help wondering what if the same resources had been applied to developing a more urban style university in the old European fashion, integrated with the city centre. UL is a decent if not outstanding example of a US style campus in a beautiful location but maybe the city could have been put in a position to benefit more from UL's success and investment. It's fanciful I know but let's say that amount of development centered around the train station could have provided the tipping point for the entire city centre.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Tue May 26, 2009 10:56 pm

Jimg, had Limerick been successful in the 1850’s in its application for siting one of the new Queen's Colleges in the city then I would agree the area around the train station would have been ideal. It would have completed / complemented the Pery Square / Peoples park area very well.

When NIHE was set up in 1972 the option of setting up around the train station was long gone. In fact the city centre had no large enough tracts of land available to it then. The large brown field sites of Charlottes Quay, the Irishtown and the Englishtown only became available in the late 1980’s.

I remember reading that the Department of Education had favoured another site, the former Mungret College for the new NIHE, but Ed Walsh had seen Plassey on the banks of the Shannon and built his American vision of a university there. The emphasis is how to integrate both of them.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue May 26, 2009 11:58 pm

It's an interesting topic and one that we touched on briefly before, over in the King's Island thread.

Theres no doubt that UL exists somewhat in its own world and unfortunately has little or no interaction with the city centre! When I was a student there, I knew of a number of people who incredibly, had never ventured into the city simply because they didnt feel the need. They felt they had all the facilities/amenities they wanted right on their doorstep in Castletroy!:(

Originally, I believe there were up to 6 sites being considered for the new NIHE. These included the Plassey estate, Knockalisheen camp, a site near Raheen Industrial estate and Mungret College.

I don't think any sites in relative proximity to the city centre were ever actually considered. Sadly, as CologneMike has already mentioned, its unlikely that a large enough site would have been available at that time anyway!
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue Jun 09, 2009 6:25 pm

UL recently celebrated the 20th anniversary of the granting of its university status (June 1st, 1989). The Limerick Leader has published a couple of articles to commemorate the event.


University challenge

It took many years of lobbying before Limerick got a third level institution. As UL celebrates 20 years of university status, key figures recall the joy and the struggle. Anne Sheridan reports

ON THURSDAY, June 1, 1989, the University of Limerick bill was brought through the Seanad - bringing to an end a campaign for a university in Limerick, which began in the 1840s.

As far back as February, the tension in UL was palpable when the Minister for Education Mary O'Rourke was about to introduce legislation granting university status.
In the days leading up to the news a major celebration was being planned days in advance but kept top secret until the official announcement was made.

No one was invited until that very day, but 5,000 people gathered at the campus to be part of a "momentous occasion" that evening. Those in the higher echelons had known four days previously, and Minister O'Rourke, was present on campus to make the announcement.

Chuck Feeney, the billionaire American philanthropist, who donated millions to UL's capital projects, had flown in crates of champagne from the United States that morning.
He was there too, as was Dr Tony Ryan, the founder of Ryanair, and deputies Michael Noonan and Willie O'Dea. Everyone had wanted to share in this moment.

"It was the most memorable and probably the most astonishing day of our lives, bar getting married and having children," recalled Dr Edward Walsh, the university's founding president, who remained in office for 28 years. "For most of us it was probably the most astonishing day in our careers."

Noel Mulcahy, former vice-president of UL, sang 'There is an Isle', but 20 years on memories are hazy of those dizzyingly exciting moments.
It was, Dr Walsh said, "an emotion packed day" and not merely an academic event - even when the Taoiseach and Minister O'Rourke formally opened the university on September 14, 1989.

"It was the end of a long, long struggle. It was almost an emotional achievement knowing the many generations who were involved in attempting to achieve this."
President Emeritus John O'Connor, who collected Minister O'Rourke from the airport that morning, added: "People didn't need very much encouragement to enjoy themselves.
"I'd say everybody was singing that night. All the stops were pulled out."

Mr O'Connor, who began work in the then National Institute of Higher Education in the early '70s, remembered the fireworks display and the efforts it took to resolves security issues. But the event was doubly significant. Not only was UL the first university created in the history of the State, but they also had the power to confer their own degrees - unlike other universities which preceded it.

The long and ardous fight for university status had seemingly afforded them more privileges than most. "We decided who should receive a degree, whereas the others, like Cork and Galway, were dependent on the National University of Ireland office in Dublin," said Dr Walsh.

Furthermore, it provided them with the go-ahead to push for funding internationally "without having any ambiguity" and Feeney's role in UL gathered momentum, backing development projects such as the University Concert Hall and the Castletroy Park Hotel.

"I remember one of the first things I did when Chuck Feeney came to Limerick was walk around with him and show him a pile of briars across the road. We talked about how the university would really benefit from a world class hotel, but didn't have the money to build one. A week later he brought me up to Ashford Castle and laid the plans out for the hotel," said Dr Walsh. The deal was done; another coup in a long line for UL.

Up until the granting of status, Walsh said they focused on "extracting as much as we could" though the State. "But this permitted a new wave of great development. We were way ahead (of other colleges] in terms of our investment profile."

Mr O'Connor said the fact that Limerick didn't have a university didn't deter Feeney, though in wider circles the concept of an NIHE "does take explanation to a third party".
"The university charter set the base for a massive expansion; it was a fantastic boost. But we treated it as a university from the very beginning. We always operated at a university level, even when we didn't have a charter. We didn't want to have to wait a university to make things happen," said Mr O'Connor, adding that statutes can take years to bring in, but UL achieved it in five months.

However, it was a long and sometimes frustrating wait for many behind the university campaign.

THE BEGINNING

"A ROSE by any other name," commented James Tully, the Meath TD, in a Dail debate on April 17, 1969, following repeated queries if a new educational institution in Limerick would be established, and if indeed it would be called a university.

It may not have started out as a rose, but with careful, steady pruning, the campus that is the University of Limerick has blossomed, growing in size and stature over the past 39 years.

It began its life as the National Institute of Higher Education in 1970, taking in the first group of 113 students in September 1972, when it had just five degree programmes, five diploma programmes, and 12 faculty members.

Now, the university counts over 11,500 students and 1,500 faculty and staff.
Fast forward 37 years and Professor Don Barry, the university's third president, said despite the challenges posed by a deficit in Government funding for third-level education they are still committed to "creating the most outstanding student experience in Ireland", and the development of world-class research.

The granting of status in 1989 was, he said, a "momentous occasion...followed by 20 years of remarkable success," attributable to "the collective vision, effort and commitment" of the campus community.

However, many of those who began their careers with the NIHE and led the campaign for a university in Limerick in the late 50s, will not be there this Thursday, May 28, to celebrate the occasion.

Yet, Ann Sadlier, Dr Edward Walsh's secretary from the very beginning, who passed away a fortnight ago, and many others who played a largely unrecognised part in the university, can lay claim to that history. Many of those present, particularly the university's current students, may not be aware of the struggle it took for Limerick to be granted its status.

Dr Walsh has recalled the "sackcloth and ashes plight" of the institution back in the '70s - as his successor Dr Roger Downer would later term it.

The founding president said when they commenced work on Monday, January 19, 1970 they had no office, no typewriter, not even note paper. This newspaper reported at that time that the new director of the Institute of Higher Education was seen working with his new staff member from a parked car in O'Connell Street.

"Our budget for 1970 was £5,000 so the prospects looked bleak indeed," said Dr Walsh. "But the Limerick County Council made available the office they had abandoned at 71 O'Connell Street. Anne and I moved from the car and commenced a working partnership that was to last for a further 25 years and see the creation of the University of Limerick."

Moves to establish the University of Limerick date back to 1845 when the mayor led a delegation to London to make the case for one of the proposed Queen's colleges.
Cork, Galway and Belfast were chosen as the locations for the colleges, with Limerick narrowly missing out in favour of Galway.

After accepting its first cohort of students in 1972, the NIHE finally morphed into the University of Limerick in 1989, having passed through the hands offive education Ministers.
It then became the first 'new' university created in the Republic after the creation of the Free State.

As a consequence, sources point out that it was viewed as "the baby" by the Higher Education Authority, the Department, Dr Walsh and possibly Feeney also.
In the early years, Walsh said, "it was generally held that Limerick had been fobbed off and nothing of a consequence would result."

Mr O'Connor agreed - somewhat. He said everyone at the opening of the NIHE by the Taoiseach Jack Lynch felt "a great sense of a mission" because there was always "a sense of the outsider".

Yet, "the underdog" of Irish education would soon prove the naysayers wrong.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue Jun 09, 2009 6:43 pm

UL dreamers refused to be put off

Former mayor Tony Brommel tells the story of the start of Limerick's campaign for a university

FORMER Mayor of Limerick Tony Bromell believes that were it not for the efforts of the Limerick University Project Committee, which was established on October 19, 1959, the university as we know it might not be there today.

"To start looking for a university at that time seemed to be the most daft thing you could think of," said Mr Bromell, one of two surviving members of the original committee. The other members were: John Moloney, Dermot Hurley, Margaret Liddy, Tom Duffy, Pat McCarthy, Jim Lyons, Gerard O'Connor, Sean Prendergast, Michael Finnan, John Hurley and Jack O'Dwyer.

He continued: "It was a time of utter depression with massive unemployment, massive emigration and widescale poverty. People wanted jobs. A lot of people were suggesting at that time that we shouldn't have become independent at all...that 1916 was a waste."

"To talk to the general population in Limerick in that time about creating a university, the reaction was 'we'd prefer a job'." Despite all that, he believed they "sold the message very well" and got the backing from people in Clare, Kerry and Tipperary, and the rest of the hinterland. "We went anywhere we were invited...or invited ourselves."

Furthermore, the need for a university in the Mid-West was clear. In 1958/59 there were only 75 students from Limerick registered in UCD, UCC and UCG, which had a total student population of 5,980, according to research carried out by the committee.

Bromell approached Paddy Hillery, the late President and then Minister for Education, at an Ard Fheis, and said he was "very favourably disposed to the idea". "I told him of the financial benefit for Limerick, and he said 'Forget about that side, and concentrate completely on education'."

Hillery set up a Commission on Higher Education to look at establishing a college in Limerick, but Bromell said they "weren't overly pleased,"preferring if they had made a decision then and there. The Commission would later recommend in an interim report that a college should be established in Limerick with a number of degrees at pass level. "And of course we said 'No way,'" he said.

He noted that Dr Walsh, too, had little time for this approach when he was appointed. "Half the courses were meant to be at sub-degree level, but Ed never bothered with that - he wanted them all at degree level." "It was his way of doing things," laughed Bromell, "that if Ed got £100,000 (from the Department] today, he'd look for another £100,000 the day afterwards."

Students accompanied by the Sexton Street pipe band went on to march outside the office of the commission and the Minister's office in Dublin, with banners proclaiming "Limerick demands a university." The project committee began taking full page advertisements in the Sunday Independent at a "huge cost," but it was a community effort and donations flooded in from the public. One church gate collection in the city yielded £200, "a huge sum in the '50s."

"It shows that if people know exactly what they want and fight for it...but of course there'll be disappointments along the way. The officials in the department knew we weren't going away; we were waiting until we got what we wanted."

Bromell said they knew there was "no way" the Higher Education Authority would call any educational institution in Limerick a university, so they pushed for the word 'national' as a prefix to the Institute of Higher Education.

It was agreed, and the wheels were finally set in motion. The site in Castletroy was purchased in six weeks – the clear forerunner over other locations in King's Island, the Raheen Industrial Estate and Mungret College. Plassey surpassed all the other options, in Walsh's view, even if the infrastructure was non-existent, and Plassey House and the surrounding 70 acres was bought for £72,000.

Bromell recalled that at that time "pigeons were flying in and out of the roof of Plassey House" and while the Department of Education insisted that the historic building be knocked down, Walsh fought to keep it "as it was something of quality from the past".

As a further matter of principle, Walsh insisted that the opening of the NIHE be an ecumenical, rather than a Catholic affair, and sought to have the Chief Rabbi at the ceremony, as well as the Catholic and Protestant bishops. "The Catholic bishop said he was happy to go along with it. The Protestant bishop was fine about it, but said he didn't want too much holy water going around and the Chief Rabbi said he wasn't coming if there was any holy water!"

In the middle of all the preparations, they received a letter from the Department of Education stating that 'no state funds were to be used' and were forced to begin their own fundraising for the event. No plaque has ever been erected on campus at the university to recognise the efforts made by the project committee in bringing the university to fruition, but President Barry said this is now something which they should acknowledge.

"It's important for the university to acknowledge its history and origins at all times," he said.

However, three of the members of the original committee, and Cecil Murray and Paraic O'Suilleabhain who later joined the group,were presented with the president's medal by Dr Roger Downer, Walsh's successor, in 2004.

Dr Walsh too noted that the efforts of the committee live on. "The intensity of the campaign lives on in the folk memory of the community: it involved marching, protesting, fundraising, lobbying, and quite exhausted every democratic device," he once wrote.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue Jun 09, 2009 6:47 pm

From tiny acorns...

Conditions at the start were so primitive, says Dr Ed Walsh, that the first meeting of the academic council, people had to sit on the floor as there were no chairs

DR EDWARD Walsh didn't just want the National Institute of Higher Education to become a university, he wanted it to become 'Ireland's MIT' or be 'better than a university'. However, a very different history could have been written on these pages had Dr Walsh chosen to stick with a position at University College Dublin and not reapplied for the job in Limerick as director of the new National Institute of Higher Education.

There was a time when he was very close to not accepting the position, viewing the job as "very precarious". In the end, he followed his wife's encouragement and his own guiding principle, "If in doubt, do it." The weakness of the Limerick opportunity was, he said, "that very little was thought out about what should be done, but the advantage was there were no pre-conceived ideas."

He was appointed in November 1969 and was to take up duty on January 1 1970. He flew out of New York on December 31 and took up the job the next day, having flown from Shannon to Dublin to meet the Minister of Education.

"The Minister said 'Money is a bit of a problem; we only have about £5,000 provided this year,' and my salary was £4,000. It looked so dismal – there was no campus site, no office..."

However, he believed his mission was clear: he was to find the best people, irrespective of nationality or creed - which he did while putting a few noses out of joint in the process. "The first serious media controversy was about why I was employing these foreigners (to build the institute]. Did they not expect me to appoint the best?" he asked mockingly. The early years, he said, were peppered with many controversies, arising from perceived 'alien' academic projects, and selective funding by the World Bank and European Investment Bank.

Other institutions looked on with envy again as UL, as it was later named, succeeded in getting millions of dollars from the American philanthropist, Chuck Feeney. At Walsh's behest, Feeney and fellow philantrophist Lewis Glucksman raised £25 million for the library alone. To get the best, the contracts to design the university, as well as recruiting personnel, were advertised internationally, and as a matter of principle, he said, they advertised in the Belfast Telegraph.

This was around the time when the restrictions facing Catholic students who wished to go to Trinity College Dublin were lifted, and his personal views on religion's place in influencing Irish education were later to become apparent. He searched around Europe looking at 'model' institutions, sometimes taking in two countries a day, and on returning began a marketing campaign to recruit the best students.

"I had a projector in the back of the car and was going around telling people what we were trying to do. I told them we were looking for students with courage, but I'm sure their parents were telling them to go to Cork or Galway. The first hundred or so were remarkable too, because they had a lot of confidence, a lot of determination and vibrancy.

"The conditions were quite primitive in a way: we were setting up laboratories out in the stables, trying to get the co-operative education up and running. It was a remarkable exercise in a very short period of time.

"In the first academic council meeting we all had to sit on the floor because there were no chairs," he says with a laugh.

He even remembers the time when the first book was put in the library, and photographed, and proudly testifies that soon after, the library had some 4,000 books on its shelves.

It was a unique experience – "nothing like this had happened in the history of the State" – and surely one that was hard to resign from, given the massive investment in energy, passion and implementing his vision.

"On several occasions I had spoken to myself – after 10 years, and then after 20 years, and then it was 28 years - about doing so (resigning]. I attempted to do it in the early '90s, even though I could have continued on until 2005, which was crazy. "You needed new blood. It was hard because things were moving very rapidly. It was like being on a conveyor belt and you need to make a special effort to get off. But in hindsight it was absolutely the right thing to do.

"Very few people get the chance to get a university going; it gives you an interesting insight into what makes human nature tick. It was a very special privilege."
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Devin » Wed Jul 22, 2009 12:13 pm

CologneMike wrote:Image
Surreal image here, huh? The yellow dormer bungalow which sits in open fields all over the country, but here with high density looming behind and AArchitecture on the right.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Wed Jul 22, 2009 10:34 pm

Devin wrote:Surreal image here, huh? The yellow dormer bungalow which sits in open fields all over the country, but here with high density looming behind and AArchitecture on the right.


The little bungalow is no more, yet another student apartment complex is being built on the site. Perhaps they should have left it alone and used it as the UL President's new on campus residence!:p
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Re: university of limerick

Postby PoxyShamrock » Sat Sep 12, 2009 7:52 pm

Tuborg wrote:The little bungalow is no more, yet another student apartment complex is being built on the site. Perhaps they should have left it alone and used it as the UL President's new on campus residence!:p


The Bungalow is gone? :eek:
:(

How did it get there anyway?
The only road there seems to be the Bridge by Thomond and that's only there since 2004.

EDIT:

Google Maps showed me the answer :cool:
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Re: university of limerick

Postby mitchell » Sun Sep 13, 2009 12:17 pm

It's still there, the new extension is being built beside it.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby zulutango » Sat Oct 03, 2009 3:33 pm

Haven't been out there in a while, but I'm led to believe that it is to be demolished, if it has not been already. The new Medical School and the Medical School residence are to be built on it.

The President's Residence is nearby and well under construction.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Oct 16, 2009 9:42 am

President’s House (Grafton Architects)

This development, on the Univeristy of Limerick campus, consists of a 3 storey building with a total floor area of 460m² and attic storage space. The accommodation contains a main arrival hall, living room, dining room, family kitchen / dining and breakfast room, utility and storage rooms, sunroom, family room , 5 bedrooms (4 en suite) and a library together with additional bathroom and toilet facilities. Site development works include the construction of site ancillary structures, new foul and surface drainage runs, electrical services and other utilities ducting, terraced areas, footpaths and landscaping facilities. The house will be completed to a high level of finishes and to a strict air tightness specification.

Source Brian McCarthy Contractors


Any up to date images about?
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Re: university of limerick

Postby reddy » Fri Oct 16, 2009 10:31 am

Wow that looks really nice. Any update on their medical school either?
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Sat Oct 17, 2009 3:27 pm

CologneMike wrote:President’s House (Grafton Architects)

Image

Any up to date images about?


I was out that way a couple of weeks back and was wondering what that structure was. It's located beyond the Health Science Building, along the river bank.

It was dark and the building was shrouded in scaffolding so it was difficult enough to see but it looked like the structure had reached it's full height. Looking forward to seeing the finished article!

reddy wrote:Any update on their medical school either?


A contractor has been appointed and they turned the sod on the site a few weeks back so work should be starting very soon!

Image

Image
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Re: university of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Thu Oct 22, 2009 9:25 pm

RIAI’s 2009 Conference in Limerick ~ Shaping Ireland’s Future

1st – 3rd November 2009 (link)

On one of the days, there will be a workshop dealing with the Regional Developments in Limerick at the SAUL (former St. Munchin’s Church Building).

Urban Forum

A workshop which will address issues of Regional Development in Limerick. Four presentations will form the basis for debate on the future of the Limerick / Shannon Region and its relationship to the other city regions in the “Atlantic Gateway” and other Gateways. This will follow up on the issues raised by the Urban Forum commissioned study “Twice the Size”.

The presentations:

  1. An overview of the Limerick / Shannon Region.
  2. A comprehensive analysis of the current situation in the region set out in the “Saul” project, prepared by the Architecture School in the University of Limerick.
  3. An overview of the strategy and masterplans prepared by the Limerick Regeneration Agency.
  4. An MA thesis “Sustainable Limerick” showing a possible future scenario for Limerick.


The workshop will build on discussions held the previous day at the RIAI Conference.

Architects compose themselves before Limerick

There was a young architect from Dub
Who went down to Limerick’s hub
to discuss the much-maligned area of design
and get to the subject’s nub.

Those heading to the RIAI (Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland) conference in Limerick, from November 1st to 3rd, are being asked to come up with limericks that will be read out at the event and possibly rewarded.

This is the first RIAI conference on Irish soil for many a year – recent architectural forays have been to New York and Venice – and staying on home turf ties in nicely with the conference themes of designing sustainably and surviving during a recession.

Architect Kevin Jackson of Murray O’Laoire will discuss sustainable energy in acute hospitals; Merritt Bucholz of Bucholz McEvoy, who teaches architecture in the University of Limerick, will look at the city’s future; architect Gerry Cahill will give a presentation on retrofitting social housing; while Greg Tisdall of StudioD and Duff Tisdall will address the question: Can architects make a living in a recession?

While five-star hotels weren’t unknown in previous conferences, now some delegates are eyeing up the Travelodge for €25 a night and the RIAI is holding a raffle for free conference tickets for cash-strapped architects.

© 2009 The Irish Times


The Travelodge offers also at firsthand some fine views of a certain mothballed NAMA project. ;)
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Re: university of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:56 pm

Medical School Accommodation 3 Buildings ~ Grafton Architects

081741

Planning permission granted to construct 28 no. student apartments to comprise 22 no. 4 bedroom units, and 6 no. 2 bedroom units, to be provided in three separate apartment buildings, ranging from five to six floors with a total combined floor area of 3,600m2 with associated hard and soft landscaping and ancillary works on the University's Clare Campus.

Garraun, Clonlara, Co. Clare

Due for completion: Autumn 2010
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Re: university of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Nov 13, 2009 11:00 pm

Goofy wrote:I have heard of plans for a 'Synthetic City' on the north bank. 4 floodlit, synthetic pitches, 1 rugby, 1 soccer, 1 GAA, and 1 hockey. along with changing facilities.


Sport Facilities ~ 4 Pitches & Pavillion ~ Project Architects

09825

Planning permission granted for the construction of a Field Sports Facility on a 9.8 hectare site within the University's Clare Campus. The development comprises four raised floodlit sports pitches, with perimeter earthen berm, ancillary lighting, boundary fences and walkways, and an 1,810 sq.m pavillion building on two levels, providing 10 no changing rooms, referee rooms, administration rooms, cafe restaurant and 2 no. coaching rooms, 392 car parking spaces, 4 coach parking spaces and associated landscaping and site works.

Garraun, Clonlara, Co. Clare

Although the 4 pitches are planned for Soccer (2), GAA (1) and Rugby (1), it good to see UL Beefing up its sports facilities with an eye on London 2012.
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CologneMike
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue Nov 17, 2009 11:09 pm

CologneMike wrote:Sport Facilities ~ 4 Pitches & Pavillion ~ Project Architects

Planning permission granted for the construction of a Field Sports Facility on a 9.8 hectare site within the University's Clare Campus. The development comprises four raised floodlit sports pitches, with perimeter earthen berm, ancillary lighting, boundary fences and walkways, and an 1,810 sq.m pavillion building on two levels, providing 10 no changing rooms, referee rooms, administration rooms, cafe restaurant and 2 no. coaching rooms, 392 car parking spaces, 4 coach parking spaces and associated landscaping and site works.



No harm to finally see some progress on this, UL have been promising to develop new pitches for a good number of years.

It'll be interesting to see what the long term plans are for the existing facilities. I wouldn't be at all surprised to eventually see more student accomodation being built on whats currently "Maguires field".

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Re: university of limerick

Postby foinse » Thu Nov 19, 2009 10:06 am

Tuborg wrote:No harm to finally see some progress on this, UL have been promising to develop new pitches for a good number of years.

It'll be interesting to see what the long term plans are for the existing facilities. I wouldn't be at all surprised to eventually see more student accomodation being built on whats currently "Maguires field".

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I'd be pretty sure that the new pitches and sports facilities are there to compliment the current facilities not replace them.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby mitchell » Thu Nov 19, 2009 6:33 pm

I don't know Maguire's field is in preety poor condition, I can't see any new field complementing it.

Though it has been UL's agends of late to concentrate on the north campus but who know's.
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Re: university of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Fri Nov 20, 2009 7:27 pm

foinse wrote:I'd be pretty sure that the new pitches and sports facilities are there to compliment the current facilities not replace them.


The main pitches will be left as they are but Maguire's is basically just a farmers field that's only really used as a back pitch, for training and the odd game here and there.

It would take a lot of work and money to bring it up to scratch and I don't see them doing that now there are definite plans for a new facility on the north campus.

Im not saying it's going to happen soon or anything but down the line, additional student accomodation is probably its most likely use!
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Re: university of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sun Nov 22, 2009 6:19 pm

In the Mid West, authorities have warned about rising waters on the River Shannon between Killaloe and Limerick. (Sunday 22nd) RTE

In Limerick, the pedestrian (Black Bridge) Plassey Bridge over the River Shannon near the University of Limerick has been closed after the local authority expressed concern over the safety of the structure.


I know that the damage caused by these floods has been enormous and hope these water volumes of the Shannon now passing through Limerick will leave the city unscathed.

Still it would be interesting to see how the flood plain around the Thomond Student Village will fare out. To my knowledge this is one of a very few building projects around Limerick where flood zones are an integral part of it.

See Murray O’Laoire Architects
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