old illustrations of limerick

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Mon Apr 07, 2008 7:39 pm

KeepAnEyeOnBob wrote:Some interesting photos here. I think I'll have to put those Limerick historical photo books on my wishlist.


Indeed a lot of interesting stuff published over the years!

  • University of Limerick A Celebration ~ Begley Hutton
  • Dowd's History Of Limerick ~ Cian O'Carroll
  • Remembering Limerick ~ David Lee
  • Georgian Limerick ~ David Lee / Bob Kelly
  • Made in Limerick Volume 1 ~ David Lee / Debbie Jacobs
  • James Pain Architect ~ David Lee / Debbie Jacobs
  • Limerick 100 Stories of the Century ~ Denis O'Shaughnessy
  • How's your Father Stories of Limerick ~ Denis O'Shaughnessy
  • Stories Of Limerick ~ Denis O'Shaughnessy
  • Limerick Boycott 1904 ~ Dermot Keogh / Andrew McCarthy
  • Father Browne's Limerick ~ E.E. O'Donnell
  • Last Word by the Listener ~ Seamus O'Cinneide / Eoin Devereux
  • The Sieges and Treaty of Limerick ~ Frank Noonan
  • The Hunt Museum ~ Helen Armitage
  • The Pery Square Tontine ~ James McMahon
  • From out of Limerick ~ Jeremiah Newman
  • The Limerick Anthology ~ Jim Kemmy
  • The Limerick Compendium ~ Jim Kemmy
  • Limerick Journals ~ Jim Kemmy & Co.
  • Limerick in old picture postcards ~ Jim Kemmy / Larry Walsh
  • The Building of Limerick ~ Judith Hill
  • Anatomy of a Siege 1642 ~ Kenneth Wiggins
  • King John's Castle ~ Kenneth Wiggins
  • Limerick Historical Reflections ~ Kevin Hannan
  • Limerick Soviet ~ Liam Cahill
  • Through Irish Eyes ~ Malachy McCourt
  • Angela's Ashes ~ Frank McCourt
  • The Government and the People of Limerick ~ Mathew Potter
  • Remember Jim Kemmy ~ Paul O'Reilly
  • St. John's Cathedral Conservation Project ~ Rev. T. Mullins
  • In the Shadow of the Spire ~ Rev. W. Fitzmaurice / Kevin Hannon
  • Limerick a stroll down Memory Lane Volumes 1 - 7 ~ Sean Curtin
  • Limerick Images of a changed city ~ Sean Reynolds / Tony Hartnett
  • The History of Limerick City ~ Sean Spellissy
  • Limerick In Old Photographs ~ Sean Spellissy
  • Limerick The Rich Land ~ Sean Spellissy
  • Shannon Airport ~ Valerie Sweeny
  • Ireland's Shannon Story ~ Brian Callanan
  • The Shannon Scheme ~ Andy Bielenberg
  • High Tension Life on the Shannon Scheme ~ Michael McCarthy
  • Bunratty Castle & Historical Park
  • Ferrars History Of Limerick
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Sat Apr 12, 2008 11:29 pm

CologneMike wrote:Patrick Street – Rutland Street

On the left hand side of the Patrick Street image below (Arthur’s Quay Shopping Centre) there are today only six Georgian buildings remaining. The other side of the street has fared a bit better, however with the proposed “Opera Shopping Centre” to the rear of the façades on the right hand side there are major changes in store. Some of the Georgian buildings will be demolished, others will be integrated into the centre and one will be restored to its original state.


With the publication of the city centre strategy, the remainder (of whats left) of the river side of Patrick Street could be about to dissapear entirely over the next couple of years. Hard to believe that in the space of around 40 years, this whole stretch of what was once, one of Limericks most intact georgian streetscapes could be no more!

From what I can gather, the street (like much of the city centre) fell into decline in and around the 1950s with many buildings becoming neglected and run down.

Patrick Steet C.1950

Image

View trom centre of street near corners with Arthur's Quay and Denmark Street towards Rutland St. Extreme l., part of shopfront of Prescott dyers, then a pub, then Irwin jewellers. On r., The Dublin House, then shopfront headed Gowns, then Alfie McLoughlin. Motor cars parked on each side of street, on l. Morris Minor TI 6673, pedestrians on footpaths. Street lighting suspended over centre of street.


In the above image, the curved building (Prescott Dyers) was taken down in the early 1960s, the site was used for advertising hoardings until the development of Aurthurs Quay shopping centre. The three smaller scale georgian buildings on the left were replaced by the National Irish Bank's concrete monstrosity in the early 70s.

In 1971, most likely due to the poor condition of some structures, the then Limerick Corporation ordered the demolition of much of Francis Street and a number of buildings on Rutland Street and Patrick Street.

Images below taken on Patrick Street in July 1971 ( Courtesy of Limerick.com)

Image

Image

Most of the remainder of Patrick Street was demolished to make way for Aurturs Quay shopping centre in 1988.

Attached: Aerial of Patrick Street area (mid 60s)
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Aug 09, 2008 5:17 pm

People’s Park

It appears the People's Park came into existence as a result of the non-completion of the Georgian terraced plans for Pery Square.

Only the tontine building scheme and the church had been completed. These buildings filled one corner of a square that could have taken 60 houses and been the size of Berkley Square in London.

In 1874 the corporation took the decision to provide a free park for the citizens. A lease for 500 years was obtained from the Earl of Limerick for Pery Square and the surrounding, vacant ground. So it was that Limerick’s only square was converted into Limerick’s first public park.

Judith Hill ~ The building of Limerick


Image

Related Posts 1 2 3 4

Two images below from the Limerick Museum Online show how the People’s Park must have looked like in 1874. The Carnegie Free Library was built in 1906.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Wed Aug 13, 2008 8:58 pm

KeepAnEyeOnBob wrote:
Image

Having seen the above photos, it's interesting to the see streetlighting with the ornate poles as in Dublin. Would it be an improvement for O'Connell St. etc. to have the repro-heritage style columns used in Dublin installed on-street instead of the building-mounted floods as at present? I think it's pretty ugly the way the current lighting has cabling attached to the building facades (although I think there's other cabling as well as for the lighting). Someone mentioned for another photo that the old street scene (from early motoring days) was nice and uncluttered, maybe the clutter problem would be worsened by having lighting standards?


Ornate Street Lamps

I fully agree. They would definitely compliment those streets that the city council has now designated as belonging to the city’s Georgian core. Best example is that horrible corner ESB pole at the corner of Barrington Street / Pery Square.

Below is or was an image of one the last remaining ornate street lamps down by the docks (Clarion Hotel?). As in the Patrick Street image above, the ornate street lamp outside Cannocks on O’Connell Street were real gems.

Limerick Museum: Larger images 1 2
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Aug 29, 2008 11:01 pm

View from Mathew Bridge (1919)

These houses seem to be typical of the style built in the Englishtown / Irishtown i.e. roof ridges at right angles to the street so that each house presented a separate gable at the front. Alas all three now demolished.

See also Dutch Billy posts 1 2

The three buildings on the corner of Bridge Street and Merchant's Quay form the backdrop, with part of the Potato Market at left of frame.

Royal Welch Fusiliers band, led by mascot, marching across Mathew Bridge. The far pavement has a crowd of people of all ages, either watching or moving away from the Cathedral.

Larger Image Limerick Museum
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby justnotbothered » Sat Oct 11, 2008 5:29 pm

Am looking for an old aerial photograph of Thomondgate/Munchin's Church from about 40 to 50 years ago if at all possible?
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Oct 11, 2008 10:40 pm

justnotbothered wrote:Am looking for an old aerial photograph of Thomondgate/Munchin's Church from about 40 to 50 years ago if at all possible?


Sorry can’t locate the Limerick Museum online link for the original image.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby justnotbothered » Sun Oct 12, 2008 12:21 pm

That's great Mike, thanks very much.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sun Nov 02, 2008 8:51 pm

There is also a fine aerial shot of Clancy Strand and St. Munchin’s Church to be seen in Sean Curtin’s book Limerick ~ A Stroll Down Memory Lane (Vol. 4 page 19).

Below is an interesting image of Thomond Bridge before St. Munchin’s Church was built.

Limerick Museum online

Local Thomondgate man Pat Doran has written an interesting book (2008).

A Clune’s Lane Fisherman ~ Pat Doran

The life of ordinary working people is often not the content of history books. However this history is as important as the reign of kings or of great wars. But from the perspective of a local historian often this history is tragically lost and is not recorded for future generations. Pat Doran has however recorded his history, life and times.

This book is a unique contribution to the social history of Limerick, looking as it does at the life of dock labourers and of salmon fisherman on the Shannon estuary. Through the eyes of Pat Doran we can gain a better understanding of the Limerick that no longer exists. The fact that a working man like Pat has documented and recorded his life is a great achievement. As a local historian I can say it is crucial that Pat’s story, and the stories of men and women like him, should be recorded for future generations.

David Lee


Sean Curtin has also just published volume 8 of Limerick ~ A Stroll Down Memory Lane and volume 9 is well underway.

He plans in volume 10 a “then and now” issue which should reveal the changing face of the city.

He has done this already in volume 4 (page 100/101) with two panoramic shots of Harvey’s/Howley’s/Bishop’s/Steamboat Quays from the 1940’s and 2004.

Sean's latest stroll down memory lane (Limerick Leader)

By Ger Fitzgibbon

THE eight volume of 'Limerick - A Stroll Down Memory Lane' by Sean Curtin has been launched by Mayor John Gilligan.

The latest volume of the immensely popular series of books, which chart the changing face of the city and county over the past century, was unveiled at a special reception in the Limerick Leader offices.

Mayor Gilligan described the book, which features such events as the 1938 City Grand Prix and the local effects of the 1973 petrol crisis, as a crucial window into our past: "People don't realise just how fast this city changes. You never know where you're going unless you know where you've come from. We're one of the oldest cities in the country. Our heritage isn't something that's been dropped in here - it's evolved over a millennium," Mayor Gilligan said

The Editor of the Limerick Leader, Alan English, said that volume eight of the series was the finest edition to date: "Every page is a delight - I'm sure the book will be hugely popular, I can't think of a better present to give anyone this Christmas. Sean Curtin's contribution to Limerick life through his column every week in the Limerick Leader has been immense."

Sean Curtin said that his love of history and local heritage has yet to waver: "You could say I live in the past. I still get a "wow factor" when I find a good old photograph. It's extremely interesting for people who only have a fleeting interest in Limerick. Not necessarily in it's history but in its changing face as well. Limerick has changed dramatically in the last 40 years. There were slums prior to that, and now it's a wonderful city being built to face the river today."

Mr Curtin said that volume eight took eleven months to put together. He added that volume nine is already well underway and is due to be launched next Christmas. Mr English, meanwhile, revealed that volume ten in the series will have a special 'then and now' format. "Sean has said that he plans to finish the series at book ten, but I sense his enthusiasm is such that he may not bow out for a long time to come," Mr English said.

'Limerick - A Stroll Down Memory Lane' volume eight is available in all good book stores now.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sun Nov 16, 2008 7:19 pm

williams lane wrote:Hi every one,i am a new member and just findin my feet,i am looking for old pictures of the Gerald griffin st aera before the trade electricl center was built,when the old houses and lanes were there.the lanes are named,(williams lane) witch is now the street leading on to summer st from the Gerald griffin side.Also (kerwicks bow) witch would have been right down the middle of the now trade electricl is now.

kind regards


Interesting request, I have been looking myself for images of that very area for sometime now (1900-1950’s).

I had a look on the Limerick Museum web site but found nothing visually on it. There is a picture taken from the spire of St John’s Cathedral in November 1950 showing the smouldering remains (fire) of the City Tannery. Brennan’s Row and some former houses on the now Trade Electrical site can be seen. See local parish book called “In the Shadow of the Spire” ~ Rev. W. Fitzmaurice / Kevin Hannan page 242.

Have a look at this aerial shot, Summer Street / Williams Lane can be seen. See link

P.S. if you do eventually get photographs of this area, do post them here.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby SuperCool » Mon Nov 24, 2008 6:34 pm

Here one I found.

Image
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Wed Dec 03, 2008 12:43 am

Just 1 or 2 items relating to a few topics discussed over in the main Limerick forum recently.

O Connell Street 1959

The photograph below was taken shortly after the fire that destroyed Todds department store and its subsequent demolition.

Saxone Shoes can be seen on the far right, this is the building that collapsed back in November 1986. At the time of the collapse a man was working on a refurbishment job on the top floor, amazingly he escaped serious injury!

The magnificent facade and landmark clock of Cannock's department store can just about be seen in the background.:(

[url=“http://www.limerickcity.ie/Museum/image/1987/19870393.jpg”]Full Size Image[/url]
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:06 am

Trinity Church, Catherine Place, Limerick, 1950s

This former Episcopal Church was built in 1834. Designed by architect Joseph Fogerty, it was said to have one of the most ornate interiors in the city. The church was purchased by the former Mid Western Health Board in the late 60s or early 70s when the interior was gutted and converted to office use.

The 2 Georgian townhouses flanking the church were later altered and used for additional office space. To add insult to injury an attic structure has also been added spanning the three buildings!:rolleyes:

Today it is the headquarters of the HSE in the Mid-West.

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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Apr 24, 2009 12:17 am

Image

Christie’s London

William Turner de Lond (fl. c. 1820 - c. 1837)

A View from Bank Place, Limerick: the New Bridge and George's Quay, with the County Courthouse and St. Mary's Cathedral behind

pencil and bodycolour, watermark Strasburg lily 171/8 x 22¼ in. (43.6 x 56.6 cm.)

Estimate (£25,000 - £35,000 Sterling)

During his visit to Ireland in the early 1820s, Turner de Lond executed two known views of Limerick, one from the North Strand (sold Christie's London, 10 July 1984, lot 175, now in the Limerick Museum) and the present watercolour.

Turner de Lond's attention to detail, both generally and topographically, is remarkable. He has chosen to depict the streets filled with the hubbub of daily life, illustrating the variety of citizenry, from the women washing their clothes in the river to the ladies riding in the elegant horse-drawn landau in the centre of the watercolour. The carriage is traditionally believed to be that of Standish O'Grady, 1st Viscount Guillamore (1766-1840) who served as Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer in Ireland for a number of years.

The topography of the view has also been painstakingly recorded providing an accurate depiction of the townscape of Limerick in the 1820s. The neo-classical building in the centre of the watercolour is the County Courthouse, built in 1809 with a portico added in 1814. Until 1760 a medieval wall ran alongside the river but was replaced by George's Quay, visible in the present watercolour on the far side of the river, along which stood various shops and dwellings, a number of which were refaced with red-brick facades, one with a Dutch-style gable. To the right of the watercolour can be seen the tower of St. Mary's Cathedral, the oldest building in Limerick, founded in 1168 and built on the site of a palace that was donated to the people of the city by Donal Mor O'Brien, King of Munster.


Glin Castle has placed this painting with Christies for sale on the 7th may 2009. Sign of the times I suppose but a must aquirement for the Limerick Museum! I posted this before and the confusing thing is that the Limerick Museum speak of the artist as being attributed to Samuel Frederick Brocas. :confused:
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Fri Apr 24, 2009 10:22 am

Well Limerick Museum have an advantage in that they can walk across the road and take another picture just the same. So they don't really have to waste the taxpayers' money on rubbish like this in an recession!
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby gunter » Fri Apr 24, 2009 11:19 am

CologneMike wrote:Glin Castle has placed this painting with Christies for sale on the 7th may 2009. Sign of the times I suppose but a must aquirement for the Limerick Museum!


. . . or the National Gallery, fabulous painting, worth every penny, screw the recession!

Haven't seen his view of Limerick from the 'North Strand', didn't notice it on their web-site, anyone got a copy?

rumpelstiltskin wrote:Well Limerick Museum have an advantage in that they can walk across the road and take another picture just the same. So they don't really have to waste the taxpayers' money on rubbish like this in an recession!


Something's gone over your head there rumpel !
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Apr 24, 2009 11:05 pm

rumpelstiltskin wrote:Well Limerick Museum have an advantage in that they can walk across the road and take another picture just the same.


Rumpelstiltskin, you are mixing up your museums, it is the Hunt Museum that is across the road on Rutland Street. The Limerick Museum is located on Castle Lane.

rumpelstiltskin wrote:So they don't really have to waste the taxpayers' money on rubbish like this in an recession!


Actually I was hoping some fairytale dwarf would come along and kick start his “spinning wheel” into action to fund this “rubbish” for us. :rolleyes:

gunter wrote:Haven't seen his view of Limerick from the 'North Strand', didn't notice it on their web-site, anyone got a copy?


This must be the one from the “North Strand” alas I find the detail to be somewhat on the blurred side.

Limerick Museum: see original

Painting, watercolour; a view of Limerick from across the Shannon, showing corner tower of the Castle St. Mary's Cathedral, the Courthouse, and Custom House; several ships tied up against the Custom House and four angling cots on the foreground side of the River; in foreground left a boat is pulled onto the shore and two carts are servicing it; in the river are three women, washing clothes?; at right a group of people are gathered around a tree.

By William Turner De Lond 1767-1827.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri Apr 24, 2009 11:15 pm

Arthur's Quay 1860 ~ Charles Mills

Though I never seen Mills painting of Arthur’s Quay, I believe the painting is impressive in size and that nice details are captured like for example a steam engine train travelling from Ennis in the background around the Long Pavement area (see circled above Thomond Bridge). Below the steam engine train crossing the Shannon at Long Pavement. I wonder where can one see this painting today?

Painting. Landscape. Arthur's Quay, Limerick, c. 1860, by Charles Mills ARHA. Oil on canvas. Depicts the River Shannon with small boats around the quay, with King John's Castle, Thomond Bridge and Clare Hills in background. Turf creels on quayside.. Frame has applied repeating pattern of applied foliate plaster ornament and is painted gold.

Limerick Museum: see originals 1 2
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby gunter » Thu Apr 30, 2009 10:43 pm

That Arthur's Quay painting is interesting, it's a pity the detail on the houses is so indistinct. When I was looking for photographs of this terrace I came across this detail of one of the houses showing flush windows again and a very fine Bank Place like door surround.

Image

Also saw a copy of a photograph of that Bruce House doorway on Rutland Street, in it's original setting (next house over), with moulded cills to the windows above!

Clearly quite a lot of early features were incorporated into the first phase of the new town expansion.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Thu Apr 30, 2009 11:14 pm

CologneMike wrote:Rumpelstiltskin, you are mixing up your museums, it is the Hunt Museum that is across the road on Rutland Street. The Limerick Museum is located on Castle Lane.



Actually I was hoping some fairytale dwarf would come along and kick start his “spinning wheel” into action to fund this “rubbish” for us. :rolleyes:



This must be the one from the “North Strand” alas I find the detail to be somewhat on the blurred side.

Limerick Museum: see original


I'm not mixing up my museums, I was exaggerating for effect. As I used to work in the Hunt Museum I'm perfectly aware of what it's called and where it is.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Fri May 01, 2009 12:42 am

Abbey River ~ Charlotte and George's Quays ~ Samuel Brocas

The New Bridge, with St. Mary’s Cathedral and the Co. Courthouse in the background, as seen by Samuel Brocas (1792-1847), in 1820. In the right foreground is the Augustinian Church in Creagh Lane and Moll Darby’s fish market by the riverside.

Source Book Cover ~ Limerick Historical Reflections ~ Kevin Hannan (1996).

He infers ownership of this painting in his book to the Knight of Glin which in turn I presumed this to be the painting that is on sale at Christie's. But this is not the case so I wonder who has ownership of it today?

The Georgian era in Limerick started here and thus I presume the source for naming of the quays after King George and his wife Queen Charlotte.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby KerryBog2 » Tue May 05, 2009 12:44 pm

Sort of tangental but............... I would be very pleased if anyone could show or point me in the direction of old photos/prints of the County Gaol.. I'm researching a hanging there in mid 1800's, so one with the gallows would be great!
Thanks,
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Jun 06, 2009 4:03 pm

KerryBog2 wrote:Sort of tangental but............... I would be very pleased if anyone could show or point me in the direction of old photos/prints of the County Gaol.. I'm researching a hanging there in mid 1800's, so one with the gallows would be great!
Thanks,
K.


Two books already mentioned here may give you some relevant information.

James Pain Architect ~ David Lee / Debbie Jacobs

The public competition to build the Limerick County Gaol was won by James Pain. There is a whole chapter just dealing with prisons in the book.

Limerick Historical Reflections ~ Kevin Hannan

Secondly in Kevin Hannan’s book there are two chapters on Hangmen (James Ryan and Marwood).

He wrote . . . . for some time after the building of the County Gaol, in 1821, executions were still carried out at Gallows Green (Cromwell Fort), in Singland. Executions were afterwards carried out in Mulgrave Street, outside the Gaol, much to the dissatisfaction of the Stretcher (Ryan), who is said to have observed: “ . . . . the green (Gallows Green) can hold a bigger crowd.” Evidently he was a man who like playing to the gallery.

Picture of main entrance of County Gaol where the public hangings would have taken place.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby KerryBog2 » Sun Jun 07, 2009 12:19 pm

Thanks CM,
Much appreciated.
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Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby bonzer1again » Thu Nov 12, 2009 3:37 pm

Has anybody got any pictures of Cassidy's Lane?....would love to see what it looked like!
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