Old pictures of Dublin

Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Thu May 21, 2009 12:09 am

Yep that's what I suspected - the street name is wrong.

And it is: Office To Let at Trinity Point, 10-11 South Leinster Street, Dublin 2 :)

What a loss of such a magnificent French-style oriel window. Very unusual in Dublin.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Devin » Thu May 21, 2009 1:27 pm

Morlan wrote:http://www.flickr.com/photos/gentlemanofletters/

Image
Taken in the 1970's at Jervis Street & Parnell Street junction where Penny's is now.
Opposite this pub (where the cinema is now) was the factory where they made Silvermints, Williams & Woods (there was always a smell of Peppermint in the air of Parnell St from it), a fine big granite building it was and I believe it was the intended destination of the rebels in 1916 when they escaped the burning GPO and tried to make their way up Moore Street.


Here's a pic below of that granite building from F. O'Dwyer's book Lost Dublin, with the Commodore on the right, and a comparison of the same view today. Ahh, the townscape charms of the Parnell Centre.

A little known building of Dublin, eh? Apparently it was originally a hospital. Maybe some Commodore patrons 'of a certain era' remember it?


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What looks like a Dublin Corporation Dangerous Buildings picture, as reprinted in McCullough's An Urban History.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Paul Clerkin » Thu May 21, 2009 1:40 pm

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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby kefu » Thu May 21, 2009 3:04 pm

Thank God for progress, the Parnell Centre has been such an addition to the city. Good riddance to that eyesore :-(
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Devin » Thu May 21, 2009 6:02 pm

I'm just looking at the 1847 map, below, when it was still a hospital. Lost Dublin says:

"In 1925, on the removal of the hospital to Wyckham, Dundrum, the building became the offices of Messrs Williams and Woods who erected factory buildings in the former gardens at the rear. It was sold for redevelopment and demolished in 1978."

Mad to think there was a gardens there, given that it's so grim and faceless in that rear lane now. So that warehouse at the corner of Kings Inns Street and Loftus Lane is the only remnant associated with the building, at least when it was a factory.

Image
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby tommyt » Thu May 21, 2009 11:02 pm

Sorry for the diversion but check this out
Dublin OConnell Bridge general traffic c.1985

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQOlJItjeZQ

absolute chaos:eek: How come I don't remember it like it was, it looks like downton Kinshasa or something.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby thebig C » Thu May 21, 2009 11:26 pm

tommyt wrote:Sorry for the diversion but check this out
Dublin OConnell Bridge general traffic c.1985

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQOlJItjeZQ

absolute chaos:eek: How come I don't remember it like it was, it looks like downton Kinshasa or something.


Memories...God I remember the orange buses and even the adverts for Granby Sausages with the 2 pigs...just about:))

C
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Paul Clerkin » Fri May 22, 2009 12:53 am

tommyt wrote:How come I don't remember it like it was, it looks like downton Kinshasa or something.


lot more cyclists too.....
just looks like a traffic free for all
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby foremanjoe » Mon May 25, 2009 9:31 pm

djasmith wrote:Date taken: April 1952
Photographer: Thomas Mcavoy[/B]


Image

Does anybody know where this photo is taken?? The houses look rather like the council houses in Marino and Inchicore.... but only one fireplace per house? Is that not rather strange?? Considering they appear to be the larger 3 bedroom houses, one would expect to find 8 chimney pots in each of those stacks, not 2....


Hey, that's Linenhall Parade, it's just off King Street North near the junction with Church Street. It's a very nice little pocket of that part of the city, those trees in the background are in the grounds of Kings' Inns. On an architectural note, the uniform render has been replaced by some dodgy individual cladding interventions, the original steel windows have lost out to our old pal PVC and if I remember correctly that lovely streetlamp with the shamrock detail has also been replaced by something far more banal.

And with regard to the fireplaces, there is one for each house. The fireplaces are placed back to back with one chimney shared between two houses. That particular terrace only contains 6 houses, hence 3 chimneys, but the majority of the other terraces in that area contain 8 houses. I think one fireplace per house is the norm for council houses of that era, I know that similar houses in Cabra, Crumlin and Kimmage have only one fireplace per house.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Mon May 25, 2009 9:53 pm

Ah great stuff foremanjoe - thanks. And hey presto, we have our terrace :)

Image

I'll pop back over in a day or two to re-take the photo. Any of the now-fifty-somethings in the picture willing to be re-photographed are more than welcome to attend!
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby djasmith » Tue May 26, 2009 3:28 pm

foremanjoe wrote:Hey, that's Linenhall Parade, it's just off King Street North near the junction with Church Street. It's a very nice little pocket of that part of the city, those trees in the background are in the grounds of Kings' Inns. On an architectural note, the uniform render has been replaced by some dodgy individual cladding interventions, the original steel windows have lost out to our old pal PVC and if I remember correctly that lovely streetlamp with the shamrock detail has also been replaced by something far more banal.

And with regard to the fireplaces, there is one for each house. The fireplaces are placed back to back with one chimney shared between two houses. That particular terrace only contains 6 houses, hence 3 chimneys, but the majority of the other terraces in that area contain 8 houses. I think one fireplace per house is the norm for council houses of that era, I know that similar houses in Cabra, Crumlin and Kimmage have only one fireplace per house.


the smallest of the council houses (the mid 1930's batch) which line the streets of crumlin and kimmage all have either 2 or 3 fireplaces per house - 1 upstairs, and 1/2 downstairs. What time would these houses have been built? Im guessing late 1920's???
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby tommyt » Tue May 26, 2009 3:54 pm

foremanjoe wrote:Hey, that's Linenhall Parade, it's just off King Street North near the junction with Church Street. It's a very nice little pocket of that part of the city, those trees in the background are in the grounds of Kings' Inns. On an architectural note, the uniform render has been replaced by some dodgy individual cladding interventions, the original steel windows have lost out to our old pal PVC and if I remember correctly that lovely streetlamp with the shamrock detail has also been replaced by something far more banal.

And with regard to the fireplaces, there is one for each house. The fireplaces are placed back to back with one chimney shared between two houses. That particular terrace only contains 6 houses, hence 3 chimneys, but the majority of the other terraces in that area contain 8 houses. I think one fireplace per house is the norm for council houses of that era, I know that similar houses in Cabra, Crumlin and Kimmage have only one fireplace per house.



A great little terrace/cul de sac of houses. When I lived in Phibsboro I always coveted the corner house furthest in the background of that picture. It has been really well extended and has a great shed in the garden and a generous driveway. The suburban dream 2 mins from the city centre.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Morlan » Tue May 26, 2009 3:59 pm

tommyt wrote:has a great shed in the garden and a generous driveway.


and I believe the owners are away on holiday at the moment.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Paul Clerkin » Tue May 26, 2009 4:06 pm

should have recognised those, i used to live just over the wall
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Rory W » Fri May 29, 2009 4:27 pm

thebig C wrote:Memories...God I remember the orange buses and even the adverts for Granby Sausages with the 2 pigs...just about:))

C


And don't forget the Picnic tinned Salmon
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Paul Clerkin » Fri May 29, 2009 4:42 pm

Always wondered how CIE chose that orange colour
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby foremanjoe » Fri May 29, 2009 5:30 pm

Apologies for the vagueness of this response but I remember a lecturer anecdotally telling us how the colour Orange was chosen for the trains and buses of CIE. From what I remember it was an international architect or designer that made the decision, and green had been the preferred choice but this guy put his foot down and was insistent that orange should be the colour. I can't remember what the reasoning behind this was but I think the general concensus at the time was that green was appropriate but this guy was obviously a top-notch purveyor of new clothes for Emperors.

Sorry again about being so vague, hopefully someone can fill in the blanks in my blanks.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby foremanjoe » Fri May 29, 2009 5:58 pm

Hang on, might I be thinking of Patrick or Michael Scott?

Their profiles on this website state that they were heavily involved with CIE and had a hand in creating their corporate identity and colour schemes?

http://www.irish-architecture.com/architects_ireland/scottp.html

http://www.irish-architecture.com/architects_ireland/michael_scott/cie.html
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby fergalr » Fri May 29, 2009 7:32 pm

Devin wrote:Here's a pic below of that granite building from F. O'Dwyer's book Lost Dublin

Image



The Parnell Centre is absolutely brutal as a building. And to think that this fine building is what it replaced... :( God it was handsome. Something that fine would be a great anchor to a street with nothing of architectural worth on it apart from the Rotunda way down the other end.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Fri May 29, 2009 11:57 pm

Absolutely, such a grievous loss. What a sense of presence it could have had as an hotel, gallery or even a Dublin Museum, with intimate spaces to the front and large exhibitions in the warehousing to the rear :(


Returning to an earlier vestiage of old Dublin, what once was this...

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...is now this :)

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(Just a sliver of artistic licence taken with the LIFE tag *cough*).

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Took a bit of time management to get the sun just right; it's still about half an hour too late, but it'll do.

And in colour.

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So much has changed by way of decoration, but also very little in terms of structural alteration. By and large we are presented with the same terraces. The two most notable developments are the application of paint over the once spare, but uniform, pebbledash finish, and of course the tragic loss of the fabulous array of elegant steel windows.

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These were of a particularly picturesque design here, which was relatively rare in Dublin.

Somewhat surprisingly, enviably, the housing scheme is nestled in a little nook beneath the glowering Kings Inns complex on Constitution Hill.

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What a delight.

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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Fri May 29, 2009 11:59 pm

Some houses have been altered beyond recognition of course...

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By contrast, the house next door is the only one left in the whole development with its original windows. These are of the plainer of the two designs used in the scheme, but are refined nonetheless. Lovely original slating too.

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Sadly, the fabulous swan neck lamppost in the original picture (that model always made for the most spectacular silhouette in black and white photographs) no longer survives, but one does cling on for dear life in an expectedly altered state at the entrance to the 'parade' at the junction with North King Street.

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Clearly it hasn't been painted since the 1920s either.

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This housing scheme is not, as is to be expected, a Corporation housing development per se, but rather one built by a so-called 'public utility society', a commonplace form of housing enterprise in the early years of the 20th century. Ruth McManus explains their operation very well, with the societies effectively operating as property development agencies through the construction of small and medium-scale housing schemes which catered for the ‘lower end’ of the housing market. In theory they were to have philanthropic aims, and by and large they did simply by definition of the modest type of dwellings that they built, usually adjacent to Corporation housing and on land provided by the Corporation with accompanying reduced rates. But like the Dublin Artisans Dwellings Company, at the end of the day these societies provided housing for those who were not in most need of being re-housed, with the desperately poor still living in tenement conditions and awaiting the direct intervention of publically-subsidised mass housing in the city centre and new outlying suburbs.

However, the societies – as with the Linenhall Public Utility Society which built the 63 houses pictured above – helped to significantly reduce the housing shortage of the 1920s and 1930s, and thus were viewed favourably by local authorities and ultimately by legislation in accommodating their endeavours.

The rendered plaque to the Linenhall Society still remains, well presented, on the central end house in the scheme.

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The building jutting into the right of the original picture is a curious semi-industrial building of c. 1910 date, built at a remove from the earlier houses on the street in what was probably wasteland at the time.

Image


Image
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Morlan » Sat May 30, 2009 2:47 am

Jesus Graham, spot on with the comparison photo.

I banged them together in a GIF (4MB), so the transition will lag at first - will loop fine after that. Should really be done in flash but I can't embed here.

Image

And then they were gone..


Facinating stuff. God knows how you managed to match those two photos so perfectly. I've always found it an impossible task with the lens distortion.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Paul Clerkin » Sat May 30, 2009 3:35 am

foremanjoe wrote:Hang on, might I be thinking of Patrick or Michael Scott?

Their profiles on this website state that they were heavily involved with CIE and had a hand in creating their corporate identity and colour schemes?

http://www.irish-architecture.com/architects_ireland/scottp.html

http://www.irish-architecture.com/architects_ireland/michael_scott/cie.html




Patrick Scott was involved with the logo design ok.
However their involvement with CIE was long over when the buses changed from the two tone dark blue scheme to that orange shade.
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby trace » Sat May 30, 2009 7:40 am

Although I can't find a verifiable source, I think Pat Scott designed the black-and-tan CIE train livery of the early 1960s. Nothing to do with the buses, though.

For more on the history of CIE train liveries (including pics but without mention of who designed what), see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coaching_Stock_of_Ireland
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Re: Old pictures of Dublin

Postby Morlan » Sat May 30, 2009 4:15 pm



Actually, I probably shouldn't have put a 4meg file in the thread! So Paul if you want to make it a link, that'd be great - I can't edit it.
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