Brick

Re: Brick

Postby gunter » Tue Mar 10, 2009 12:25 am

From November '08:

GrahamH wrote:
Image
Hey! I thought it was an unwritten rule on Archiseek that we don't post pictures of each other's houses! Dream world houses included! . . . . I bagged that wendy house years ago.



From yesterday:

GrahamH wrote:
At least my house, I mean my favourite house, survives intact :)

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I was just wondering Graham, does your . . . 'Wendy house' . . . on South William Street know that you're seeing her sister on Fitzwilliam Square??

. . . her paler, younger, sister!

No!


This is only just beginning.

*Victory dances may prove to be premature!*
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Re: Brick

Postby Peter Fitz » Tue Mar 10, 2009 3:39 pm

mammoth post Graham ;) I think your goose is well & truly cooked gunter !!!
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Re: Brick

Postby gunter » Sun Mar 15, 2009 1:40 am

Peter Fitz wrote:mammoth post Graham ;) I think your goose is well & truly cooked gunter !!!


gunter's goose may have lost a few feathers, but he hasn't been stuffed and roasted just yet!

Let's have another look at that Capel Street terrace:

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At issue is the red(ish) mortar used in the tuck pointing restoration of the facade of no. 80, which significantly alters the appearance of the brickwork from yellowish to redish.

Graham, (as a signed up member of the Yellow Brick Society) has denounced the work as injurious to the unity of the terrace, and as not an accurate restoration of the original finish, which he contends was then fashionably yellow.

Is that a fair summary?

So what does this look like to you?

Is this not a fragment of original finish found in between the blue shopfront at no 82 and the red shopfront at no. 83.

ImageImage

Or maybe this is just another example of one of Graham's convenient 'alterations' from 'sometime later in the 19th century' ! :rolleyes:
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Mon Mar 16, 2009 10:34 pm

Lol. I was very precise about 19th century alterations, so shall not get drawn in on that one.

I concede the above scene paints an interesting picture. My explanation - and I'm being neither fesecious or desperate - is that a simple red colourwash was applied between the shopfronts 'sometime in the 19th century'. The colourwash has simply washed off the bricks, but has remained on the more porous and absorbant yellow mortar (it is also of such a pungent shade as to immediately suggest a wash of some kind).

This type of scrappy colourwashing would be in character with the typical human instinct - and an especially Irish one at that - to focus on improving one's own patch in a piecemeal, detached fashion, in a manner similar to other nasty practices such as painting the grubby decorative brick and terracotta piers of one's shopfront, or tacking plastic cladding over worse-for-wear elements. A quick slap of red colourwash, however incongruous, finished off with a quick repointing would tart things up nicely at pavement level.

This can clearly be seen at the next pier down, with the division between treated lower floor and non-treated upper floor directly following the cornice line.

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In this instance, the colourwash was applied over both the original pointing and brick.

The other explanation for gunter's scenario is that, yes, a red mortar was used as a quick and cheap solution to improving the dirty pier at pavement level. But again, I would contend, a later alteration - and one that was confined to ground floor level.

(and leave my collection of houses alone - they accept shared affections)
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Re: Brick

Postby tommyt » Tue Mar 17, 2009 12:47 am

Graham-finally got a chance to catch up on this great thread and really appreciate the forensic level of detail- but may I suggest you give the door numbers of townhouses when discussing the respective facades ( as an ex-courier I would be able to 'put a face to the name' immediately if you know what I mean?)
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Fri Apr 10, 2009 10:12 pm

Now he says it, after the horse has bolted! I'll try ;)

This magnificent pile of a yellow brick terrace out in Clontarf was one of the earliest speculative housing developments to be built in the seaside village. It always catches the eye when passing along the main road from behind the greenery of its own private park. The severe Grecian entrance portal of the first house is particularly striking.

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The terrace stands as an interesting monument to the first tentative steps to turn Clontarf into the Rathmines of the northside: built in a late Georgian style, faced in fashionable yellow brick, and set back from the road shielded by its own park, all in a manner characteristic of contemporaneous southside housing schemes of the 1830s and 1840s.

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The cornice and chimneys are so handsome - the closest Dublin ever got to Regency architecture.

Beautiful use of yellow brick.

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Not a scrap of tuck pointing at this late stage.

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What makes this terrace of particular interest, however, is that it also serves as a good physcial indicator of how ultimately unsuccessful Clontarf was as a residential location until the housing boom of the 1860s. There are notably no other terraces of yellow brick houses in Clontarf characteristic of the early Victorian period, with only a handful of typical seaside rendered houses in the village proper as one would expect of a small conurbation. The majority of Victorian housing in Clontarf dates from the 1860s onwards, built in machine-made red brick, and with a particular explosion in development from the 1890s onwards (as seen below for example).

If one looks closely at the yellow brick terrace, it is noticeable that it is not symmetrical, with the right-hand projecting terminating house missing as it exists on the left, as if it was never completed as intended.

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Also oddly, there is only one entrance into what should be a dual-entrance development.

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Look a little closer still, and it all becomes apparent.

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Either this 1840s developer experienced a cash flow problem similar to his modern-day colleagues, or there just wasn't the demand for such large houses in second-rate Clontarf at this early stage.

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Alternatively, gunter's ancestors sabotaged the scheme to halt the spawning of yellow brick housing on the northside.
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Re: Brick

Postby hutton » Sat Apr 11, 2009 4:42 pm

GrahamH wrote:Alternatively, gunter's ancestors sabotaged the scheme to halt the spawning of yellow brick housing on the northside.


Lollers :D

Gunter, Graham is making a fairly convincing case at this stage; how can one explain well-detailed terraces on Lower Gardiner Street, near Talbot Street - there's some great examples of high-end development with walls of perfected blind windows, all in yellow/ brown brick?
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Re: Brick

Postby gunter » Sun Apr 12, 2009 1:23 am

hutton wrote:. . . . how can one explain well-detailed terraces on Lower Gardiner Street, near Talbot Street - there's some great examples of high-end development with walls of perfected blind windows, all in yellow/ brown brick?


Not everything can be explained hutton, some things you just have to believe!

Supposing we were to accept Graham's theory that yellow brick, for some inexplicable reason, became fashionable in Dublin early in the 19th century, the question remains around what date would that have happen? 1800: not a chance!, 1810: no way, 1820: don't think so, 1825: maybe, but that's pushing it as far as I would go.

Without ever wishing to risk a fiver on it, I've always believed that, for the bulk of the later Georgian period, say 1800 to 1820, yellow stock brick was only ever used reluctantly (probably for cost saving purposes) and in conjunction with red mortar to maintain a broadly consistant appearance with the predominant finish of imported red brick, the staple building material in Dublin at that stage for over a century.

Although they might be to some peoples' taste (or lack thereof) I find it hard to believe that D'Olier Street (1800), for example, would ever have been intended to have been presented as the yellow stock brick facades that we see, in a re-pointed state, today.

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The former Irish Times stretch of D'Olier Street and the corner on Fleet St.

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Surviving original structures on both sides of Westmoreland Street are all faced in good quality standard Georgian red brickwork and we know that the whole creation of this city block was a single enterprise, designed by a single architect (Henry Aaron Baker) and constructed in a single phase at the instigation of a single client, the Wide Streets Commissioners. Why would they have suddenly decided that yellow brick would be 'fashionable' for D'Olier Street if it wasn't 'fashionable' for Westmoreland Street? and, even if you choose to accept this unlikely scenario, at what point in the unified, wrap-around, composition did they switch to yellow?

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I think that it is far more likely, given that we know that the blending up of yellow brickwork with red mortar was a practice in use at this time, that they simply saved a few quid on brick costs when it came to D'Olier Street having made a reasonable judgement that, of the two new thoroughfares, Westmoreland Street was the marginally more prestigious.

From what I can see of D'Olier Street today, every surviving original building has been either completely re-pointed, potentially destroying the evidence of original tuck pointing using red mortar, or completely rendered over, but somewhere I'll bet there's a street name plate or a ward boundary plaque just waiting to be unscrewed to reveal a little patch of preserved original finish underneath!
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Sun Apr 12, 2009 2:27 pm

Tsk - we're going to have the rank the media machine up a gear to face down this relentless anti-yellow brick spinning from 'the other side'.

gunter wrote: the question remains around what date would that have happen? 1800: not a chance!, 1810: no way, 1820: don't think so, 1825: maybe, but that's pushing it as far as I would go.


Quite the opposite from what I can make out - you need to go back to the 1790s to include the first, and by all accounts very substantial, yellow brick terraces of Gardiner Street. Agreed it would be most worthwhile to find the earliest openly 'out' yellow brick buildings in the city.

I've always believed that, for the bulk of the later Georgian period, say 1800 to 1820, yellow stock brick was only ever used reluctantly (probably for cost saving purposes) and in conjunction with red mortar to maintain a broadly consistent appearance with the predominant finish of imported red brick, the staple building material in Dublin at that stage for over a century.


Alas you've been fed a pup, gunter! And I suspect the same is the case for a disturbing number of bricklayers and pointers in the city. The obsession for lashing on pink mortars (which conform to neither red or yellow traditions!) over perfectly sound and naturally coloured yellow brick (and often red too) is surely a Dublin peculiarity.

...given that we know that the blending up of yellow brickwork with red mortar was a practice in use at this time


We don't know this at all! Indeed I have yet to come across a single example in Dublin, let alone even a vaguely convincing one, where yellow brick was colourwashed and/or pointed using red mortar from the outset of the building's construction. The Capel Street terrace has far from proved to be such a case, and beyond that contentious little number we have encountered nothing thus far.

I'm glad the Westmoreland/D'Olier Streets example has been raised. As the most ambitious set-piece of urban planning of its age in Ireland, this development must surely stand as an accurate barometer of accepted tastes in brick amongst the architectural establishment, and thus eliminating the more muddled aspirations of the developer and self-builder.

There is little question that Westmoreland Street, as the more prestigious of the two thoroughfares, was built intentionally in red brick. Red brick was indisputably the prestige material of the 18th and 19th centuries, notwithstanding intermittent favouring of yellow brick along the way. However, the use of both red brick and yellow brick was also an intentional device in my view, designed to generate a distinctive identity for each street, rather than have them both entirely of the one material. The fact that the Wide Streets Commission were also desperate to inject some modicum of graciousness into Dublin street architecture through the employment of London-esque dressings, suggests they were also favourably disposed to the use of yellow brick in the London manner.

Good question about where the red ended and the yellow began on the distinctive ‘triangle’ plan. I imagine the apex building (now demolished) was built of red brick, with yellow following directly after for the entire length of D’Olier Street. Given the relatively narrow depth of that building, this would not have been overly jarring to the eye (shown here with Victorian accretions).

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I believe the Carlisle Building formerly on the site of O’Connell Bridge house was also of brown brick? I do accept though that cost may well have influenced matters to some degree on D'Olier Street.

But there is absolutely no question in my mind that D’Olier Street was intended as anything other than an expressly yellow brick street. There is no evidence whatever on its many surviving facades to suggest the use of either red mortar or colourwashes, either original or later alterations. The mortar joints also appear to be original in some cases (it’s difficult to be sure viewing from street level), and exhibit no hint of tuck pointing as the yellow brick is of such regular quality.

We must also remember that the yellow brick scheme also extended all of the way round onto College Street and also jumped over to the site of Pearse Street Garda Station with what would appear to be a distinguished matching yellow brick building with granite dressings.

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Re: Brick

Postby gunter » Sun Apr 12, 2009 9:25 pm

GrahamH wrote:We don't know this at all! Indeed I have yet to come across a single example in Dublin, let alone even a vaguely convincing one, where yellow brick was colourwashed and/or pointed using red mortar from the outset of the building's construction.


That's because some of us are refusing to accept the evidence that's been put before us ;)

The way I understand it, ninty five percent of Georgian facade brickwork was tuck pointed, (do we agree with that ?), using red mortar and thin projecting lines of lime putty to imitate the other five percent that was high quality red, fine jointed, gauge brickwork.

That is the context in which I've always understood that the practice of using cheaper local yellow brick started, when they discovered that, employing the same combination of tuck pointing in use on red brickwork, yellow brickwork could be made appear not dissimilar and with presumably a considerable cost saving, as with the Capel Street house that started this discussion.

hutton wrote:. . . . how can one explain well-detailed terraces on Lower Gardiner Street, near Talbot Street - there's some great examples of high-end development with walls of perfected blind windows, all in yellow/ brown brick?


GrahamH wrote:. . . . quite the opposite, from what I can make out - you need to go back to the 1790s to include the first, and by all accounts very substantial, yellow brick terraces of Gardiner Street.


I think you're both way off the mark on that one.

The terraces of Lower Gardiner Street look 1820s to 1830s to me, which explains the yellow brickwork, as far as I'm concerned. There's nothing there on the 1797 map and the terraces up the hill on Middle Gardiner Street and even Upper Gardiner Street, as with Mountjoy Square (not finished until 1818) were all red brickwork.

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1797 map showing no development between Beresford Place and Middle Gardiner Street, and little indication that development was imminent.

As far as I know that former church behind the loop line bridge, designed by Frederick Darley (Gardiner St. Dole Office), was built circa 1838! The brickwork here is indisputably yellowish brown and it matches very well with the brickwork of the adjoining terraces, including that one with the blind windows on the side elevation noted by hutton.

[Quote=GrahamH;93802]
Alas you've been fed a pup, gunter!
[/QUOTE]

Starting a smear campaign? , . . . . gunter doesn't feed on puppy dogs!
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Tue Apr 14, 2009 10:11 pm

Fight fire with fire!

Okay you've definitely got us on the Gardiner Street houses.

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It was a presumption partially based on the completion of the Custom House in 1791. I doubt they're much later than 1820, having looked at them closely, but am open to correction on that. The economy of their detailing relative to their contemporaries on Fitzwilliam Street raises a smile.

Yes tuck-pointing was used on the principal facades of the vast majority of Georgian buildings. Contrary to popular belief, however, it was not a 'prestige' detail, used only on prized buildings and the houses of the extremely wealthy, as is often remarked. It was a device used out of necessity on all buildings above that of artisan level. Guaged brick was virtually unheard of in Dublin, as was pretty much the same in London I imagine, and was more associated with the Continent. Thus, tuck-pointing was a British Isles solution to a British Isles problem (with Irish, or 'bastard' tuck-pointing a variation on that again, of which more in due course).

However yellow brick as far as I'm concerned was a deliberate architectural choice, not considered a compromise, and most certainly not pointed over in red mortar. This was a later trend of the Victorians, and we all know the dangers of blindly following the trends of a society which considered the Ha'penny Bridge a blight on the city. I do concede that the harsh economic climate of post-1800 probably fuelled the popularity of the use of yellow brick in the completion of the large residential estates.

A typical Gardiner Street house of c. 1810-20 ;)

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Tuck-pointing still clinging on at this late stage.

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The harsh effects of battering elements on exposed upper storeys. Yikes.

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And Darley's very attractive little number beside the railway bridge. It mellowed so well, as do most yellow brick buildings.

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A number of parallels with the earlier Clontarf terrace.

And for what it's worth, just to show that the Clontarf development also did picturesque in addition to austerity, here's its cutsey gate lodge behind the yellow brick gate piers.

Image
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Tue Apr 14, 2009 10:27 pm

An example of very poor pointing of yellow brick buildings also occurs on Gardiner Street. Indeed, these buildings were probably the first large-scale case of yellow brick houses to be cleaned and re-pointed in Dublin. The effect is far from pretty.

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Very simply, the problem is that the wrong colour mortar was used. It's positively peach!

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Dear oh dear. What a mess.

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There's just no quality control over this sort of thing. The samples applied for the Conservation Officer to inspect (if they even got to see any) should have been the guiding template.

By contrast, an excellent example of yellow brick tuck-pointing occurs on this fabulous Regency building on Mayor Street.

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Need the matching colour of the dark bedding mortar and the bricks, and the off-white creamy tone of the pointing be even noted...

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Perfection.

Finally, probably the worst case of dodgy pointing in the entire city can be seen around the corner from Gardiner Street on Talbot Street. This time it's the opposite to when we're used to seeing.

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Yellow mortar pasted over red brick with a shovel :eek:

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(though at least yellow brick gets its own back ;))
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Re: Brick

Postby gunter » Thu Apr 23, 2009 10:38 pm

GrahamH wrote:Finally, probably the worst case of dodgy pointing in the entire city can be seen around the corner from Gardiner Street on Talbot Street.


Not sure you have to leave Gardiner Street to find 'the worst case of dodgy pointing in the entire city', look at the great sand and cement ridges on this one!

Image Image
. . . . and in no way does that hanging basket redeem what's been done to the brickwork :)

Back on the southside, I was going to concede your wretched Merrion Square yellow brick terrace (posted on a previous page), but then I took a stroll down that way . . . .

Image Image Image
This is your terrace, it runs from the last good red brick house at no.76, to no.87 on the corner with Merrion Street Upper.

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no. 83

What is clear is that no house within this terrace has escaped re-pointed, except for no.83 which thankfully retains a good proportion of it's original tuck ponting. Once again on the house that looks least altered, we find the same red mortar we've seen across the city at this period, and once again the effect is the same:- the appearance of the yellow stock brick is transformed into something very like the appearance of the terraced houses constructed in imported red brick (also tuck pointed with red mortar).

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Anybody hungry? . . . we're having goose :)
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Thu Apr 23, 2009 11:16 pm

That is absolutely, unquestionably not the case. The visual evidence of the wide shot tells it all, with the Victorian veneer exposed for the sham that it is at attic level - the red colouring having simply been washed off. The 'red mortar' you refer to, as far as I can see, is simply the original yellow mortar with aborbed Venetian red wash. It stands out more than the brick as the mortar (by design) is softer than the substrate, while it has washed off more quickly from the harder brick which originally absorbed less. You can see quite clearly that the original white tucks were just washed over at that time too. It was an awful job. All it needs is an array of prissy Victorian nets to complete the po-faced aspirant ensemble.
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Re: Brick

Postby gunter » Fri Apr 24, 2009 12:37 pm

GrahamH wrote:That is absolutely, unquestionably not the case . . . the Victorian veneer exposed for the sham that it is at attic level - the red colouring having simply been washed off. The 'red mortar' you refer to, as far as I can see, is simply the original yellow mortar with aborbed Venetian red wash . . . all it needs is an array of prissy Victorian nets to complete the po-faced aspirant ensemble.


Image

Solid 1820s? block on Nassau Street, constructed in your favourite yellow stock brick, very fashionable you might say!

They were a busy lot Graham, your . . high wire Venetian-red Victorian veneer washers! . . . here they are again wantonly targeting no. 16 (the Northern Ireland Tourist Board shop) and no. 17 (Lapis Chocolate Café).:)

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Very devious of them to always destroy all evidence of the ''original'' yellow mortar;)
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Sat Apr 25, 2009 8:31 pm

At last! A convincing case! (though I'd be interested to see other parts of the facade also). I (almost) concede to this being the first likely instance of original red mortar application over yellow brick yet uncovered. Even then I'm somewhat wary, going by the sheet glass windows above the NI Tourist Board, and the dark appearance of its wider facade. It could yet prove to be a later alteration.

In any event, I'd be pleased if this did prove to be an authentic example of red mortar application dating from the time of construction. At least we will know that it did happen. Either way, we have still proven beyond doubt that this was categorically not standard practice. If even 5 per cent of yellow brick buildings were treated in this way, I'd be surprised.

A modest yellow brick terrace on Synge Street. What in the name of...

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More bizarre anchovy paste application of Enid Blyton proportions.

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Woeful stuff.

The George Bernard Shaw house across the road wasn't treated much better (blue door), though at least it has mellowed somewhat.

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The first house is an example of red wash application (hard to know if it's later or not). In this case, the joints were simply roughly stuffed with white mortar and then square brick shapes painted over each brick and surrounding excess jointing mortar, presumably using a form of Venetian Red.

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This would appear to be a variant of the Irish 'bastard tuck', the only difference being the use of Venetian Red wash rather than more substantial red mortar.
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:53 pm

Historic Brick Pointing

Okay, so belatedly, some images showing the composition of the most common pointing techniques. These are demonstrated by Gerard Lynch, master bricklayer and brickwork consultant.


Tuck Pointing

This was the most common type of pointing used in the 18th century and early 19th century for the principal facades of brick buildings, along with the Irish variant known as 'wigging'. It came about as a result of the irregularity in shape of handmade bricks, and the desire to imitate high-quality guaged brick found in continental Europe.

It is a relatively simple technique, though requiring skill in execution. A rough bed of stopping mortar, of a colour matching the brick, is first applied into the joints.

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This is then lightly grooved to receive a later ribbon of tuck putty.

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Once this has been done, lines of lime putty are then carefully applied along the length of the groove, using a piece of timber as a guide.

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The ribbons are then precisely trimmed of excess using a palette knife.

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Vertical tucks are typically applied using a narrow putty trowel.

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Again, these are carefully trimmed.

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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Wed Apr 29, 2009 10:55 pm

Wigging

The Irish variant, known as 'wigging' or sometimes 'bastard tuck', is perhaps unsurprisingly a cruder form. To what extent this was used over English tuck pointing (above) I'm not sure. Frankly, I'm not sure anyone really knows. Susan Roundtree is probably the best bet.

This process involved the pasting of thick courses of lime putty into the joints.

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This white putty was then trimmed and moulded to create a central ribboned profile.

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To either side of this ribbon, a course of coloured stopping mortar was then applied, giving roughly the same effect as tuck pointing.

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The part-finished result.

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Pencil Pointing

Another common technique was pencil pointing, using a fine line of white putty literally penciled into a shallow groove in the stopping mortar.

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Image


Weather-struck Pointing

Also weather-struck pointing, used commonly in the 19th century with regular machine-made brick, using a potent black putty.

Image



Image
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Re: Brick

Postby lostexpectation » Thu Apr 30, 2009 8:14 pm

at last, i was totally lost, why do you need to add the fake 'stopping mortar'

and then add wash on top of it?

why not just apply the mortar to the bare brick and do the putty second.
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Re: Brick

Postby Peter Fitz » Fri May 01, 2009 8:45 am

I think Graham was saying the rough bed of brick coloured mortar was added initially to conceal any irregularity in brick size, which was common.
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Re: Brick

Postby lostexpectation » Fri May 01, 2009 2:16 pm

yeah but you could still do that first and putty afterwards
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Re: Brick

Postby Peter Fitz » Sat May 02, 2009 10:58 am

ah you mean for the 'wigging', don't get that at all myself.
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Re: Brick

Postby GrahamH » Wed May 13, 2009 4:09 pm

Sorry, completely forgot about this thread :)

I'm not completely sure what either of you are talking about! If you refer to colourwash lostexpectation (as in a dye that changed the colur of the bricks), this was rarely, if ever, applied to my knowledge at construction stage. Rather this was sometimes applied many years later to spruce up the appearance of sullied brick.

As Peter says, stopping mortar was only used to conceal the irregularity of handmade bricks. Wigging refers to the Irish alternative where thin bands of stopping mortar were applied over white mortar or putty.

I'm still not sure if that answers the questions!

Either way, all shall be explained in detail at the demonstration seminar outlined below. It was at this event that the above pictures were taken a couple of years ago.


ONE DAY CPD SEMINAR
Historic Forms of Jointing and Pointing

Tuesday 9th June 2009

Dr Gerard Lynch
Co-author of Bricks – A Guide to the Repair of Historic Brick as part of the Advice Series, published by the Department of Environment, Heritage and Local Government.

Time: 9.00am – 5.00pm
Cost: €175.00
Application Form: Click Here

Venue: Drimnagh Castle, Longmile Road, Dublin 12

Dr Gerard Lynch is an internationally acclaimed and highly respected historic brickwork consultant, master bricklayer, educator and is author of Gauged Brickwork, A Technical Handbook and Brickwork: History, Technology and Practice.

Timetable:

9.15 am – 9.30 am
Registration

9.30 am
Welcome and Introduction
Geraldine Walsh CEO Dublin Civic Trust

9.30am – 11.10 am
Dr. Gerard Lynch
Conservative Repair of Traditionally Constructed Brick Buildings
Philosophy and Principles of Repair
Detailed Survey
Establishing Pointers
Foundation Failure and Recommended Treatments
Failure of Related Parts of a Building
Failure in the Bonding
Failure of Bricks
Discussion

11.10am – 11.30 am
Coffee

11.30 am – 1.00 pm
Dr. Gerard Lynch
Repointing Historic Brick
Raking and Filling
Demonstration.

1.00pm – 2.00 pm
Lunch

2.00 pm –4.00pm
Material for Mortar and Analysis
Choice of Joint
Aftercare
Discussion


Dublin Civic Trust
4 Castle Street, Dublin 2
Tel: (01) 475 6911
Fax: (01) 475 6591
Email: info@dublincivictrust.ie

http://www.dublincivictrust.ie/courses.php
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Re: Brick

Postby lostexpectation » Wed May 13, 2009 7:48 pm

its seems awkward to apply the mortar after the putty
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Re: Brick

Postby ctesiphon » Wed May 13, 2009 10:25 pm

GrahamH wrote:I'm not completely sure what either of you are talking about! If you refer to colourwash lostexpectation (as in a dye that changed the colur of the bricks), this was rarely, if ever, applied to my knowledge at construction stage. Rather this was sometimes applied many years later to spruce up the appearance of sullied brick.

As Peter says, stopping mortar was only used to conceal the irregularity of handmade bricks. Wigging refers to the Irish alternative where thin bands of stopping mortar were applied over white mortar or putty.

I'm still not sure if that answers the questions!


I was confused initially, but I think the question was, essentially, Why use wigging when tuck pointing is obviously better?

GrahamH wrote:11.30 am – 1.00 pm
Dr. Gerard Lynch
Repointing Historic Brick
Raking and Filling
Demonstration.


Is this the bit where you stand at the gates of Drimnagh Castle with a picture of the Capel Street house in one hand and a Down With This Sort Of Thing placard in the other? :)
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ctesiphon
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