Trinity College Dublin

Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby fergalr » Tue Dec 30, 2008 7:42 pm

gunter wrote:
Image


Georgian perfection. How are we incapable of surpassing the architects and city planners of two centuries ago?
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Wed Dec 31, 2008 6:36 pm

Well to be pedantic about it, only one of the Trinity buildings there is actually Georgian ;). And I suspect the average Georgian architect would have severe misgivings about the Rubrics being deemed as representative of their time; indeed one of the reasons they knocked buildings like it in Front Square. So perspectives do change - New Square for example would have been deemed far superior to the recently demolished Library Square that we now hanker after. Similarly, the Trinity campus would arguably be more picturesque now had the 'architects and city planners of two centuries ago' not had their way! Still, agreed, there is something about the dense, regimented character of the ranges that is difficult - if not impossible - to recreate in a modern idiom. The lack of use of brick, and in a crafted way, in modern construction is a particular failing I think.

Darn you kinsella! I was hoping the pebbledash wouldn't be raised :). I suspect it was added in the 1890s. Quite a few of the rear window widths are irregular, as with some floating long sills. It seems likely that a number of pragmatic tweaks had taken place over the years that necessitated the application of a unifying coat of pebbledash over the whole lot. Indeed not unlike these early Georgian houses on the Billy thread.

Image

Quite a few parallels there actually. It's also possible the Rubrics covering was added earlier, perhaps in the 1840s, recalling that pebbledashing was also added to the Royal Hospital by Francis Johnston in the early 19th century.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby fergalr » Thu Jan 01, 2009 6:56 pm

Do you have pictures of every structure in Dublin?:eek:
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Fri Jan 09, 2009 5:35 pm

Just not your house yet, fergal. I'd keep the curtains closed...

A charming Edwardian view of the Provost's Saloon c. 1910.

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Pleasantly free from the typical cluttering excesses of the era, things appear more reticent here - if staged within an inch of their life.

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The real delight is the ever-cumbersome early electric conversion :). A plentiful supply of sockets and switches about the panelling and pilasters too...
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Jack Hogan » Wed Feb 04, 2009 7:37 pm

Does anybody know if the creation of the entrance from Nassau Street, as part of the construction of ABK's Arts Block, was controversial at the time? I assume that breaking the perimeter in a second location was a big deal but I can't find any information regarding Trinity's policy on the restriction of access to the campus..
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby ctesiphon » Thu Feb 05, 2009 2:11 pm

I saw Paul Koralek lecture on ABK's work in TCD a few years ago (1999?), and he said that he considered the breaking of the wall and the creation of a new access point to be their single greatest achievement in their long involvement with the campus.

From that, I think you could probably infer that the college authorities were somewhat resistant to the idea, though Mr Koralek did not elaborate.

Whether TCD had a policy regarding restricting access, I don't know. I do know that UCD, when moving to Belfield, had concerns about providing too many access points to the (at the time, 200 acre + and growing) campus, due to fears about public use of the 'private' land. This was in contrast to the policy of the English universities constructed under the auspices of the University Grants Committee in the 1950s and 1960s, where the grounds of those universities - Sussex, UEA (Norwich), York, etc. - were considered to be amenities for the adjacent towns/cities.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Thu Feb 05, 2009 2:23 pm

Well the generally policy is that, without a specific swipe card, you can't get on to the college grounds without passing a porters' lodge, which means, of course, it is expensive to introduce a new opening.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Jack Hogan » Thu Feb 05, 2009 5:23 pm

Very interesting, thanks. For my thesis project (laboratories and offices), just started, I am using the long site between the Ussher and Grafton's extension to the Dept. of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, probably leveling the Moyne Institute - hence my inquiry...
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Thu Feb 05, 2009 10:11 pm

I have often thought about that site; what would be cool would be a modern take on the closes you get in medieval towns, Edinburgh being the great example, so build along the perimeter but with passages descending to small partly covered court-like spaces with views of College Park and a mixture of uses. There should absolutely be accommodation on the College side ground floor and please leave the Moyne Institute, there is space to build behind it; do something clever with it as Grafton did with the Engineering building.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby what? » Fri Feb 06, 2009 1:44 pm

Yes, leave the Moyne Institute alone. It is the prominent example of totalitarian architecture we have in this city.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Fri Feb 06, 2009 2:27 pm

Yes; that's it, I have always thought of the Moyne Institute as a prominent example of something but could never quite find the word.

Jack Hogan: are you also supposed to do internal layout because I can give you my thoughts on lab space if that would be useful?
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Mon Apr 27, 2009 8:06 am

Finally some common sense on student accommodation: TCD accommodates 10% of its students, city center universities typically accommodate over 40% and in the states even more. Universities are efficient land lords, they can force students to keep up with rent by refusing to give them their exam results until they pay of arrears, those few who genuinely are in difficulties, well the University tries to look after students in that situation anyway and a short term rent rebate is a good way to help. Student accommodate makes for a proper Unversity experience and helps the University acquire land that might in the future be used for other purposes. In the plan discussed below, TCD says it want 1000 rooms within half an hour of the College, I hope they get somewhere in town and I am sorry they are still obsessed with large scale provision without also pursuing piecemeal acquisition, but it is better than nothing.

from http://buckplanning.blogspot.com/2009/04/trinity-college-throws-developers.html who may repeating it from the Sunday Tribune.


Trinity College throws developers a lifeline
Developers with housing estates lying empty in Dublin are set for a huge fillip. Trinity College Dublin (TCD) has circulated a requirement for 1,000 student residential units by September 2010, and possibly as many as 3,500 by 2020.

The student residences and associated facilities must be close to the university "or near a public transport system facilitating a maximum commute of approximately 30 minutes", according to documents circulated by the university last week. That means areas as far away as Sandyford and Dun Laoghaire in the south of Dublin and Howth in the north could be considered because of the Luas and the Dart. Large parts of the docklands and Poolbeg would also be suitable.

"The accommodation may be new purpose-built or existing accommodation, modified if necessary, to satisfy the university's requirements," the documents state. Undeveloped sites will also be considered.

"They could possibly get the residences for below build cost," one expert said last week, citing the fall in property values, the number of residential developments lying vacant and some developers' desperate need for working capital.

Consultants Bruce Shaw are handling the process for the university and TCD has said the contract for the chosen sites "will include any required design and other services necessary for its procurement and may also include options for full operation and/or financing".

A contract notice relating to the need for the student accommodation is expected to be published in the second quarter of this year.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby lostexpectation » Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:03 am

so what developments would be suitable?

"housing estates"? in the suburbs?
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:16 am

I doubt it lostexpectations; the college has no experience of looking after houses, though in my view they should, I am sure they want to buy an apartment block, for example, with provision for shops on the ground floor that could be turned in to common room areas. You would have thought there was something along the north dock.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby lostexpectation » Mon Apr 27, 2009 12:07 pm

smithfield
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Mon Apr 27, 2009 12:54 pm

How about the watchtower; wouldn't that be cool.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Fri May 08, 2009 8:56 pm

Webcams showing the big hole for the Pease Street development:

http://www.tcd.ie/biosciences/webcams/
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby johnglas » Fri May 08, 2009 9:21 pm

notjim: an interesting-looking building and a big statement on Pearse St; any more images? The details on TCD's website are very scanty.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby missarchi » Fri May 08, 2009 10:31 pm

could almost be a metro station... forming the future college green triangle
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Fri May 08, 2009 11:06 pm

Well I have seen a few more pictures, but the college seems shy about them since it is quite a massy building. The planning application has more, it is 4064/08
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby spoil_sport » Sat May 09, 2009 12:40 am

That planning ref is for a completely different thing....
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Sat May 09, 2009 9:22 am

I am sorry, I meant 4995/06
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby thebig C » Sat May 09, 2009 10:34 am

Didn't IM Pei design an office/hotel for that site about 10 years ago? If I recall it looked quite cool. Although....it did have a tower....which is a big NO NO!:)
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby thebig C » Sat May 09, 2009 10:39 am

notjim wrote:Well I have seen a few more pictures, but the college seems shy about them since it is quite a massy building. The planning application has more, it is 4064/08


Their new building on the corner at Westland Row is very well finished. The one problem I have is, when you are some distance away walking towards it up Townsend St, the plant room on the roof looks very untidy!

Ok, I know this is a problem in Dublin and its not the worst example, their is a particularly bad lump above Trinity St which looms over Pen Corner, but even if they had put some glazed penthose space in front or even clad the plant the same as the rest it would be ok.

Has anybody else noticed?

C
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Sat May 09, 2009 12:10 pm

thebig C wrote:Didn't IM Pei design an office/hotel for that site about 10 years ago? If I recall it looked quite cool. Although....it did have a tower....which is a big NO NO!:)


That was a slightly different site, it included this one but it also involved the two corners of Westland Row and Pearse St, the one where the sports hall is now and the one with Goldsmith Hall, which would have been demolished. It also involved building over Pearse Station. It was very ambitious and it even had a glass pyramid. A few things went wrong; IE weren't so keen on the joint plan maybe, part of the funding involved a global headquarters for Elan, which suddenly went through a crisis, the planners weren't keen and the government started reducing the University block grants relative to their activities. Either way, the plan was dropped and the big CRANN/Sports Hall/Science Gallery building built instead on the one corner and Goldsmith left standing on the other.
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