The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby lexington » Tue Nov 29, 2005 6:29 pm

John F. Supple Ltd seem to be (to borrow a nice Louth phrase) "suckin' diesel" on the Leeside River Walk along the Distillery Fields. A nice view of the walkway can be seen from Grenville Place across the river. The bridge opening should coincide with the walk's completion. Looking forward to it - it's a great contribution and utilisation of our riverside.
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d_d_dallas had a nice image of the Shadon Bridge up on the previous page, however the link has since been altered. So I just said I'd reinstall it for viewing sake. :)

Image

And another for...'why not?' sake...

Image
View North to South along Bridge
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby Radioactiveman » Wed Nov 30, 2005 6:17 pm

Here's a better image of the completed Mardyke Bridge:

<img src="http://www.corkcorp.ie/news/images/bridge4.jpg">
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby PTB » Fri Dec 02, 2005 11:52 pm

bunch wrote:does anyone know the cost of the Pink Link bridge in Glanmire? - it was built to facilitate approx 4-5 houses - I have yet to see one person use that bridge - what a waste of funds - value for money! btw it looks terrible in my opinion - fussy and a bit twee for a motorway bridge.


Cost of the bridge: 2,000,000 euro approx
Cost of a tunnel: 300,000 euro approx

And you wonder where all the money goes on motorways.
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College Gates Bridge

Postby lexington » Tue Dec 13, 2005 3:39 am

Another wonderful perspective of the College Gates Bridge at University College Cork - not too far away from the Lewis Glucksman Gallery. It's setting most certainly aids the bridge's appeal - surrounded by the dramatic cast iron gates of UCC, a cascade of weeping willows, the stillness of the Lee's North Channel and that beautiful limestone cottage on the southern end of the bridge.

Image

Below, the earlier posted image taken north-to-south affording a vantage of the stone cottage in daytime.

Image
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby PDLL » Tue Dec 13, 2005 1:58 pm

PTB wrote:Cost of the bridge: 2,000,000 euro approx
Cost of a tunnel: 300,000 euro approx

And you wonder where all the money goes on motorways.


This is an interesting issue which has, in my opinion, real implications for the development of infrastructure in Ireland in general.

Many countries on the continent that have excellent infrastructure in comparison to that of Ireland, often do not bother so much with 'beautifying' that infrastructure. It appears more acceptable to simply build mass concrete bridges, flyovers etc with making any attempt to concela their often grim appearance and functionality. In ireland, we seem to spend much more time and money on concealing the mass concrete structures (eg. the masses of stone cladding used recently to line the walls of the new road through Sligo). This could be one reason it costs so much to construct motorways in Ireland in comparison with other countries. Personally, I am just amazed that we appear to be so concerned with the aesthetic impact of our infrastructure given our often lack lustre approach to architectural aestethics in general.

In short, I would hazard a guess that in Germany they would have built the tunnel and another .5km of motorway somewhere - we however go for a moderately styled bridge.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby POM » Tue Dec 13, 2005 3:39 pm

PDLL wrote: Personally, I am just amazed that we appear to be so concerned with the aesthetic impact of our infrastructure

.


Would it be better if we werent???
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby PDLL » Tue Dec 13, 2005 3:48 pm

POM wrote:Would it be better if we werent???


I didn't make any value judgements on whether we should or shouldn't be. I just think it appears incongruous that a nation that very often appears to show very little concern with the appearance of many of the buildings it builds, seems to put disproprotionate emphasis on 'finishing off' structures which other countries leave in a raw state.

In comparison with our continental neighbours, do we devote more project funds to landscaping and post-construction 'polishing off' than other nations. If so, it might explain why we have one of the lowest rates of motorway km per person in Europe.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby anto » Tue Dec 13, 2005 8:48 pm

See all that Granite facing on the walls on the Stillorgan dual carriageway. Must have cost a fortune. The pedestrian bridge near foxrock church is also granite faced which frankly looks ridiculous. It's hardly "babbling brook" territory. There's also granite facing on the bridge out at Kilmacanogue. Would be far better if a striking contemporary design was used. Some of the newer pedestrian bridges over the m50 come to mind.

Always notice that the council only does all this granite facing when going thro' the leafier upmarket areas. Wonder why?
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby A-ha » Wed Dec 14, 2005 3:09 am

Anyone able to hazzard a guess of how old Cork's oldest bridge is?
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby jungle » Wed Dec 14, 2005 12:23 pm

A-ha wrote:Anyone able to hazzard a guess of how old Cork's oldest bridge is?

All bridges or just the pedestrian ones? And presumably only ones over the Lee and only the current construction of the bridge.

As a complete guess, I'd say Clark's Bridge is the oldest and that it dates from the middle of the 18th century.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby Radioactiveman » Wed Dec 14, 2005 5:20 pm

I'm reliably informed that the oldest bridge in Cork is that one to the west of the existing St. Vincent's pedestrian bridge (i.e. on the former Irish Distillers site).
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby jungle » Thu Dec 15, 2005 3:34 pm

Radioactiveman wrote:I'm reliably informed that the oldest bridge in Cork is that one to the west of the existing St. Vincent's pedestrian bridge (i.e. on the former Irish Distillers site).

I didn't think of that one, although it certainly fits all my criteria even if it is a very small channel of the Lee.

It looks very old. Do you have any idea when it was built?

Incidentally, travelling 50 km out of the city, the bridge at Glanworth dates from the 13th century and is reputed locally* to be the oldest bridge in Europe that is still used for everyday traffic.


*Read into that what you will
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby PVC King » Wed Feb 01, 2006 6:03 pm


New pedestrian bridge opened in Cork

01 February 2006 12:25
A pedestrian bridge across the River Lee was officially opened this morning by the Lord Mayor of Cork, Councillor Deirdre Clune.

It is part of the Lee Walkway project which began five years ago and will eventually provide a pedestrian route from the city centre to Curraheen on the outskirts of the city.

Costing €2 million, the Mardyke walkway will also facilitate the movements of thousands of UCC students between their southside campus and northside campus.


From RTE

Any images of the completed structure?
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby Radioactiveman » Wed Feb 01, 2006 7:10 pm

Here's an image of the new Mardyke bridge:
<img src="http://www.corkcorp.ie/news/images/bridge4.jpg">

also, here's an image of the <b>FIRST</b> official 'opening' of the bridge on <b>17th June 2005</b>!!!!
Former Lord Mayor Sean Martin is there with the usual gang, blatantly codding us by suggesting that the bridge was in fact open to the public!
The first time the public got near the new bridge was when it was opened to UCC students and staff on the 11th of January 2006! Today's opening (phase two) allows the public to continue through Distillery Field to the North Mall. Unfortunately, as of ten minutes ago, phase two of the walkway was once again closed to the public!! Genius, sheer f***king genius!!

<img src="http://www.corkcorp.ie/news/images/bridge1.jpg">
<i>The phantom 'opening'</i>

If you want to see a nice aerial view of the new walkway and bridge, click <b>here</b>.

If you want to see a map of the new walkway and bridge, click <b>here</b>.

And to see the FIRST official 'opening' in all its glory, click <b>here</b>.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby PTB » Sun Feb 05, 2006 1:24 am

What exactly was the logic behind giving the first official opening months before the bridge was open? It wasn't coming up to elections was it?
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby corcaighboy » Sun Feb 05, 2006 12:05 pm

Politicans in Cork are 'serial announcers'....with the bridge here a case in point. Other notable examples of this condition are the redevelopment of Kent station (in the news again this week!), the reopening of the Midelton railway line, and almost every other infrastructure project in town. :mad:
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby kite » Sun Feb 05, 2006 12:49 pm

PTB wrote:What exactly was the logic behind giving the first official opening months before the bridge was open? It wasn't coming up to elections was it?


:rolleyes: The answer is on the plaque in the photo, as Lord Mayor you get your name in stone, vanity is a serious disease in Cork.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby lawyer » Sun Feb 05, 2006 5:53 pm

I went along the new walk this morning and I must say the views were great. I had never seen the Maltings or St. Vincent's Church from these angles.
It is quite silly to have plaques from two Lords Mayor. One opening the bridge and months later, another opening the walk.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby PVC King » Wed Jul 26, 2006 12:33 pm

Do the airbridges at Cork Airport count as a pedestrian bridge?
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby jungle » Wed Jul 26, 2006 12:42 pm

Thomond Park wrote:Do the airbridges at Cork Airport count as a pedestrian bridge?

What's with the plural in that sentence? :D
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby rebel_city » Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:15 pm

Nano Nagle Bridge is defo the bridge linking Sullivans Quay to the Grand Parade. Alot of tourists use that bridge to get good shots of St.Finbarrs Cathedral. Parliament Bridge is a fine brodge too - nice views of the Holy Trinity and St.Finbarrs. Let's hope the Jacobs Mall building will compliment the view also!

I live in Dublin and the other day as I was walking to the bus stop from the IFSC to D'Olier St for the bus I was thinking of the boardwalk which is installed there - having a similar one in Cork. Along the quay from Patricks Bridge to the Coal Quay - lots of new buildings there / people traffic - Opera House and the new Cornmarket St. development. Who know's. They seem quite popular in Dublin - with a few kiosks along one of them.

The Shakey Bridge, as far as I know, is not so Shakey anymore! But it'll always be the Shakey Bridge! Great bridge!
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby jungle » Wed Jul 26, 2006 1:43 pm

If you make an effort, you can still get the Shakey Bridge going...

It's funny, you should say about a boardwalk down by the Opera House. I was walking along there the other day and thinking about how unpleasant the general environment is down that way. With the four lanes of traffic and the narrow footpaths and the difficulty crossing the road, I wondered if it might impact on the ability of new businesses in the area to trade properly. Perhaps a boardwalk could be incorporated into a new plan for the area.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby phatman » Wed Jul 26, 2006 2:56 pm

jungle wrote:If you make an effort, you can still get the Shakey Bridge going...

It's funny, you should say about a boardwalk down by the Opera House. I was walking along there the other day and thinking about how unpleasant the general environment is down that way. With the four lanes of traffic and the narrow footpaths and the difficulty crossing the road, I wondered if it might impact on the ability of new businesses in the area to trade properly. Perhaps a boardwalk could be incorporated into a new plan for the area.



I saw it mentioned by someone else, and so had a look myself, but the new paving and railings being installed on Penrose Quay are fantastic, really look well, and would be great if expanded to other areas. Check it out, just down from Michael Collins Bridge.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby Spinal Tap » Wed Jul 26, 2006 3:07 pm

phatman wrote:I saw it mentioned by someone else, and so had a look myself, but the new paving and railings being installed on Penrose Quay are fantastic, really look well, and would be great if expanded to other areas. Check it out, just down from Michael Collins Bridge.


Yes they are great and really show up how bad the quays are treated in general with no pavements,car parked or very close to awful balustrading.A minimum of a 2 metre pavement with trees and seating should be provided on all our quays. Merchants Quay and Georges Quay are some of the worst and the quays around the School of Commerce full of cars parked head on into the Quays.
We can only dream.
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Re: The Pedestrian Bridges of Cork

Postby Ebeck » Wed Jul 26, 2006 7:17 pm

I think there is a pedestrian bridge being constructed as part of the new Jurys Hotel development on the Western Road. There is some formwork spanning that channel of the river so hopefully a walkway is being constructed, it will probably be similar to the existing bridge a few metres away.

Either that or the site engineer needs to get the dumpy level checked!
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