New Developments in Galway City

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby justnotbothered » Wed Apr 05, 2006 10:19 pm

Fin, can I just add myvoice to the claim that recent developments in Galway seem to be going out of their way to be ugly and unimpressive. GMIT wins an award for their "sails" and sudenly everything has to have copper cladding? There's a difference between "dragging someone into the 21st century" and building ikea flat pack, fold away buildings.
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby Jammyd » Thu Apr 06, 2006 4:05 pm

id have to agree there in my opinion there using this green copper way too much.. even in the new eyre square enhancement it looks tacky
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby FIN » Sat Apr 08, 2006 6:35 pm

i agree jammy...copper is being used way too much. wellpark has way too much of it,if they restricted it to the cinema it would have done, eyre square has a couple of toilets clad in copper....they don't look too impressive at the moment but i am awaiting completion to see how they fit overall. ...but even in the county towns they are going mad for copper. there is 2/3 in loughrea and now one in craughwell.i am sure oranmore isn't too far away from getting one. i 'm not too sure if ballinasloe has any yet or is likely to get. more than likely it's in the pipeline. maybe one in a town is ok but people see what happened with gmit and copy it. it's just some people take it too far. personally i think it's lazy architecture just to put something that is in fashion at the time u are designing.shows a lack of iminagation.
the buildings that i was talking about do not have any copper...well not too sure on the new bus park as i haven't seen the elevations in a while but the others don't.
i will say this, i am not a fan of the ral colour that was picked for the blanking panels in the glazing. i can see where the cut-backs took effect when building.
i will admit that the use of copper is creeping in to some designs from okm but this is being kept to a minimum.
he doesn't like our designs ( as a company ) but maybe he could get a job here and try to influence 'better' design :) we are always looking for staff....
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby Jammyd » Mon Apr 10, 2006 4:50 pm

hate to tell ya fin but oranmore has already got one in a new scheme with Vivo and subway in it, also the new shopping centre planned for the corner of eyre square/prospect hill is clad in copper.. pics of it were in the city tribune recently.. its a disgrace
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby BTH » Mon Apr 10, 2006 7:18 pm

As i recall it's used reasonably sparingly on that Prospect Hill design u mention JammyD, just for roof features and I think one strip running down the facade - for once it actually looked like the use of copper was quite well-considered in the renderings I saw, not just plastered on without any real thought (as on the Oranmore project you mentioned which is one of the worst schemes I've seen in a long time!).
Personally I love copper as a material and I really think that the patinated stuff really works well with the quality of light etc. in Galway in particular. Plus it has a reasonable precedent on old public buildings such as the University and the Cathedral. It's the absolutely bitty, tokenistic use of it on buildings like the new development at the Claddagh basin that really pisses me off whereas on something like Wellpark, GMIT and even the new building in Loughrea it's used with a little bit of flair... Give me copper roofing/cladding/detailing any day over PVC or cheap aluminium panels!
The Eyre Square jacks and Kiosk are a joke, I can't believe they are being so stupid to use Copper in this way on buildings which are going to get so much wear/grafiti/abuse etc... I guarantee they will look disgusting within a month of the square opening just like what happened with the Living Room...
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby FIN » Mon Apr 24, 2006 11:15 pm

i agree there.
and may i say that it was the developers choice in oranmore for the copper. ( i forgot about that one ) it was not in the design.i like timber i must say..there is one in loughrea at the mement that looks quite interesting. and the 3d went back up in craughwell last week and it doesn't look too bad.
i haen't seen the new train station yet...any links?
that thing down on the claddagh is not very nice alright. i think it's the windows that make it completely shite though...plus there is way too much copper
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby Jammyd » Tue May 30, 2006 8:52 pm

was just wondering has anyone noticed how the new hotel in ballybrit is flying up the design of the building is really interesting it looks to me like its going to be a landmark building as its in such an important site entering the city . does anyone have any images of the final look of the hotel also how long is dunnes going to be digging next door it seems like months now theyve been excavating the site.
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby shiloh » Mon Jun 19, 2006 12:52 pm

Well Galway seems to have been put on the cards this year with the Eye Cinema - Edward Holdings/Douglas Wallace scheme - which was named best commerical building of the year for 2006.
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby CologneMike » Tue Dec 05, 2006 12:37 am

University unveils plan for €400m expansion (Irish Times)

Lorna Siggins, Western Correspondent

http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/ireland/2006/1204/1164823956522.html

NUI Galway has drawn up a €400 million expansion and development plan, involving 20 large infrastructural projects on its 260-acre campus.
The plan, which will be unveiled today, also aims to turn the campus towards the river Corrib and develop the riverside environment. Sale of existing university property on Nun's Island in the city centre may be required to finance the ambitious scheme.
The university hopes to raise the target sum of €400 million through State funding, college resources and private, philanthropic donations.
NUI Galway (NUIG) president Dr Iognáid Ó Muircheartaigh says the plan responds to a 40 per cent growth in student numbers over the past six years, and to the university's role in supporting indigenous, high-value industry.
"Already we are home to the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science and the Digital Enterprise Research Institute, which are world-class facilities," Dr Ó Muircheartaigh says.
"We also have the Moore Institute, which is undertaking pioneering research in the humanities and social sciences."
The university now has an international reputation for supporting "fourth-level" activity, as in postgraduate research, but similar "world-class facilities" are required for its undergraduate students, he says.
The college has grown from 11,000 students in 2000 to 15,000 students currently, and to this end the NUIG's governing authority authorised a capital development programme in May of this year.
Work has already begun on some of the new projects, but the college wants to ensure that future development is integrated, rather than piecemeal. Flagship buildings will include a new €21 million sports centre, a cultural centre, and an engineering building due for completion in 2009 at a cost of over €50 million.
It will replace the existing engineering faculty accommodation spread across 13 buildings, most of which are off the main campus and which include valuable city centre property on Nun's Island.
A new human biology building will combine the work of the departments of anatomy, physiology and pharmacology, while a new law school will include jury rooms and a court room which can be used by the Courts Service on campus.
The plan involves refurbishing the 19th century quadrangle, extending the existing arts millennium building and clinical sciences institute, expanding the James Hardiman library and replacing pitches at the sports grounds in Dangan.
An emphasis on "campus mobility" will include a new entrance on Newcastle Road and parking and transport initiatives such as "park and ride" to reduce pressure on the university's existing carparking facilities.
The "campus of the future" programme aims to "harmonise the natural and built environments", preserving existing walkways and open spaces where possible and "creating" a riverside "amenity" which can be used by the wider Galway community. The "student experience" will be a core principle of the development, which is all subject to planning approval, Dr Ó Muircheartaigh says.
A model of the proposed development will be on display at the Orbsen building, NUIG, from 10am to 4pm over the next fortnight, and local consultation will take place on a "project by project basis".

Campus Aerial View:

Image

Campus Map: http://www.nuigalway.ie/about/maps/map.php

NUIG News & Events: http://www.nuigalway.ie/news/main_press.php?p_id=403

Image below Irish Times:
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby CologneMike » Sat Jan 13, 2007 12:34 am

Finding its place on the waterfront

© 2007 The Irish Times Wed, Jan 10, 2007

Galway's new museum has been dogged with difficulties, and seems to be still trying to establish its core identity, writes Lorna Siggins
"The museum will be part of what we call the 'ring of pearls' for Galway city." Senator Fintan Coogan, Seanad Éireann, June 2nd, 1999
"A museum is a non-profit making, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development . . . which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education and enjoyment, material evidence of people and their environment."


International Council of Museums
When Galway city councillors met before Christmas to discuss their new "pearl", the philosophy of a museum may have been on the minds of some - a philosophy which has changed radically since the early exhibits of Renaissance collectors and "wunderkammer" or privately-owned "cabinets of curiosities". Yet the main thrust of the debate focused on euro and cent, and whether the new cultural institution should have an admission charge.
Thankfully, city officials' preference for a fee was voted down by elected councillors during the budget debate. Feeding into that debate, however, was a simmering sense of frustration on the part of several councillors in relation to progress since the museum opened earlier this year. "After an experience like Eyre Square, one is entitled to be a bit paranoid about anything that Galway City Council lays its hands on," said one councillor who did not want to be identified. "One would hate to think that this paranoia might be well founded."
Designed by Ciaran O'Connor and Ger Harvey of the Office of Public Works (OPW), the €9.6 million structure has been a long time in gestation since Ireland-West Tourism identified it as a priority in a study of the city's cultural needs. "Our artefacts cannot be displayed there. It is embarrassing to show tourists the size," Fine Gael senator Fintan Coogan said of the existing civic museum in Comerford House, Spanish Arch, during a June 1999 Seanad adjournment debate - although the white-washed house and its curator Bill Scanlan were, and are, still the subject of several warm reviews in international guidebooks.
A feasibility study was commissioned by the Heritage Council and the local authority in 2002, which stated that such a structure should be a flagship project with its "unique waterside location, its remarkable medieval heritage and the city's own reputation as a cultural tourism destination". The site next to the Spanish Arch and behind Comerford House was identified; it was agreed that costs would be shared by Galway City Council and the EU.
The building was completed by contractors John Sisk and Son Ltd within budget - to the considerable relief of officials still dealing with the Eyre Square debacle. However, like the square, the museum was behind schedule. Construction deadline was June 2005, and fit-out deadline was to have been October of the same year.
In September 2005, councillors were informed that building was continuing, but was "90 per cent" complete. Tom Connell, director of services for environment, recreation, amenity and culture, said that in spite of the delays it would be a "fantastic infrastructural asset to the city". Fine Gael councillor Padraig Conneely accused the council of "pouring money down the drain" after he learned the position of curator would have to be re-advertised, because the chosen appointee had decided not to take it up. A panel of other suitable candidates had not been earmarked from applicants.
THE MUSEUM EVENTUALLY opened in early summer with curator/director Sarah Gillespie, who previously worked with the National Museum of Ireland (NMI) and Tipperary South Riding museum in Clonmel. Shortly afterwards, it won a Bank of Ireland Opus architectural award for 2006. The judges noted that it raised the standard and design for the "city of the tribes". "This small building does many things very well," the Opus citation said. "A derelict site adjacent to the Spanish Arch has been positively transformed into a new civic space, defined by the new museum, the old city wall and the free-flowing river Corrib.
"Unlike most museums, it is outward- and not just inward-looking," the citation continued. "It embraces the city vistas and could be a cultural metaphor for a dynamic Galway. We hope it will be an active cultural centre rather than an old-fashioned museum. We know that Galway has been waiting a long time . . . but this building was worth the wait."
Two concurrent shows were opened to the public for the summer - a display of 55 pieces from the Bank of Ireland's art collection, including work by Louis le Brocquy, Robert Ballagh, John Behan, Martin Gale, Tony O'Malley, Nano Reid, Patrick Scott and Camille Souter; and the museum's first temporary exhibition, Conamar Cathrach/Fragments of a city, comprising some of the best medieval and post-medieval stone carvings from the city's collections, which was curated by city heritage officer Jim Higgins.
During last year's Galway Arts Festival, the new square backing on to Spanish Arch and the old city wall became the venue for a 20-foot fire-breathing body of a sculptor, entitled Hell Bent and mounted by Scottish visual artist David Mach. In November, the museum became an art gallery yet again for the Tulca Visual Arts Festival when artist-in-residence Louise Manifold hosted The Ghost Gaol, an animation project based on the old Galway jail building which closed in 1939.
Also, as part of Tulca, the museum hosted Omey, a collection of photographs of Omey island off Connemara by French-born Irish resident Nicolas Feve. It was hung in the museum's "black box", or climatically controlled room - the only such area in the entire two-storey building. However both Sarah Gillespie and her deputy, former city council Irish language officer and press officer Breandán Ó hEaghra, stress that the building has "met NMI criteria" and envisage no difficulty with this.
Under the Cultural Institutions Act, museums are only empowered to acquire and display archaeological objects on behalf of the State if they are so designated by the director of the NMI. This designation must also extend to the curator. A number of regional museums, including Kerry, Mayo County, Donegal and Tipperary South Riding, have already applied. Once recognised, costs of acquisitions can be shared under a scheme run by the Department of Arts, Sport and Tourism, but there is no department with overall responsibility for the entire museum sector.
Galway is working with the NMI on its application, according to the NMI, which denies reports within museum and conservation circles that it was not consulted adequately about the project. During the hot mid-year months of last year, the city council acknowledges that there were issues with over-heating due to its large windows which offer stunning views of the city and bay. These "issues are being addressed", says Michael Burke, Galway City Council senior executive officer.
Burke stresses that the NMI consultations were initiated at a "very early stage", and points out that the Office of Public Works had already designed the NMI's new folklife building at Turlough Park in Castlebar, Co Mayo. Raghnall O'Floinn, NMI head of collections, confirms that his institution was consulted at "feasibility stage" about Galway's plans, and says it will be working with it on loans of NMI material this year.
Mayor of Galway Niall Ó Brolcháin is concerned, however. He cites issues such as storage, and the state of existing city artefacts which have been kept in the previous premises at Comerford House. "City officials have told me that the most important items are being well looked after, but there is still material in the old building, and there is a question as to whether that building and the artefacts therein are being properly maintained," he says. "You only have to look in the window to see." The mayor is also uneasy about the museum's decision to close for two months from late December to mount permanent exhibitions. "This museum is a tremendous addition to the city," he says. However, he said he is very disappointed with the problems involved in getting it up and running.
There are plans, weather permitting, to sail a full-size Galway hooker into the Claddagh from Carraroe, haul it out of the basin, treat it and hang it from the museum's ceiling - never to touch salt water again. Construction was commissioned by the local authority from builders in Carraroe, and the vessel will be suspended from the main atrium area.
Ironically, traditional boat owners who could not avail of Gaeltacht grants had appealed to Galway City Council earlier last summer to give some financial support to their sector. They argued that such craft have become an international symbol of the city, but are very expensive to maintain for those owners who are not able to avail of Gaeltacht grants for them. It is understood that both the city council and Galway Harbour Company have responded positively to the case made.
STILL, SOME MEMBERS of the Galway hooker community believe that it is "madness" for the city council to spend so much money on a new craft with no history, which will be imprisoned in a building that looks out onto several Claddagh vessels sharing decades of sea miles along the Atlantic coastline. BreandáÓ hEaghra defends the project. "It wasn't just about building the boat, but about filming the method by which it is done, recording that tradition."
Michael Burke of Galway City Council says the museum does have a mission statement, which is "being finalised", and is based on a report commissioned from museum consultant Aidan Walsh several years ago. During the eight- to 10-week closure, sets will be mounted, objects placed under the supervision of conservators, and information panels and audio-visual equipment installed. Permanent displays will begin on the ground floor, and the aim is to relate the history of the city through a "series of storylines", which will be similar to a "theatre set", Gillespie and Ó hEaghra explain. "Looking at the past through the present, if you like," Gillespie says.
Key events such as visits to Galway by Pope John Paul II and the late US president John F Kennedy will be recorded, and the idea is to "give visitors a flavour of what Galway is and what makes it special". One of the more interesting ideas is the community gallery, comprising pieces selected by 12 individuals who were asked to define what Galway meant to them. A 13-year-old boy made a model of Eyre Square out of metal; another chose his brother's hurley stick; another participant chose stones and sand from the shores of the bay. A "medieval gallery" will relate the story of Galway's tribes, and the second floor will focus on the Claddagh and its development.
Ó hEaghra, whose remit extends to education and outreach, has plans to tap into Galway's arts community, and intends to organise talks, seminars, workshops on specific crafts - similar to those hosted by the NMI's folklife museum in Mayo. He says that the museum will be "child-friendly", and is very optimistic about its future. "It is a fresh canvas," he says. "A very exciting challenge."

The Galway City Museum seen from under the Spanish Arch. Photograph: Joe O'Shaughnessy
Photograph: The Irish Times
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby Seanselon » Mon Jan 22, 2007 2:50 pm

CologneMike wrote:The Galway City Museum seen from under the Spanish Arch. Photograph: Joe O'Shaughnessy
Photograph: The Irish Times


Nice image of the new Galway museum building seen through The Spanish Arch. Wonder if anyone has a picture looking in the other direction through the arch. If so, we will see the unmitigated disaster in urban planning that Galway City council has allowed since the late 80ies. Some of the carbuncles given consent would easily qualify for Irelands worst buildings and are excellent candidates for the wrecking ball.

Anyone got any pictures of that?
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby rob mc » Fri Feb 09, 2007 8:55 pm

oh my god guys i seen this and just had to post it i just crapped my pants.
these are the plans for galway in the next 5 to 10 years
N6
The N6, estimated to cost €500 million, is presently at an advanced stage and the compulsory purchase of all lands is nearing completion, we understand all parts of this road will be under construction before the end of 2007. (The contracts have been awarded to the Spanish Giant Construction – P.J Hegarty Company. It is anticipated that this road will be open in 2010, largely impacting on areas like Kiltullagh, Athenry, Oranmore and the Ardaun Corridor.

GALWAY CITY OUTER BYPASS
The next phase will be the GCOB, the Galway City Outer Bypass, which involves the construction of 27km of roadway including the fifth bridge over the Corrib estimated to cost in the region of €340 million. The C.P.O. process has already begun on the road, which will commence at Briarhill/Garraun, continue north where it will cross the Tuam Road (N17) at Two Mile Ditch, travel in a westerly direction where there will be a major intersection at Ballindooley with the N84 Headford road.
This will open up access for areas like Corrandulla, Headford, etc. It will then continue west where it will cross over a new bridge on the Corrib at Menlo (this is very significant as it will be the 5th bridge over the Corrib), then continuing in a westerly direction towards Bushypark and dissecting Glenlo Abbey Golf Club, before crossing over the Moycullen Road (Junction A – benefiting Moycullen, Oughterard, etc.) and turning further west bypassing Knocknacarra and then emerging on the west side of Barna. It will be a dual-carriage and will be equivalent to a ring road around on the west/northern side of Galway City. This has huge implications for all of Galway. First of all, it will make commuting time from all of these areas much more accessible, creating serious opportunities for land development and providing further opportunities for house buyers, warehouses, commercial buildings, shopping centres and park and ride. Bearing in mind the continuation of the provision of the infrastructural services like sewer, water, energy and roads which will open up enormous development potential.
TRAIN STATION, HARBOUR AND C.I.E SITE
Ceannt station is about to be upgraded and C.I.E have a large land bank zoned C1 which is earmarked for the biggest development ever in Galway. It is proposed to construct a 600,000 sq.ft shopping centre which would be the second biggest enclosed shopping centre in Ireland after Dundrum. The total development will be 1,500,000 sq.ft or about €2 billion. A planning application is to be lodged for this in the summer of this year.

As it stands the project is now at an advanced stage with CIE and the Harbour Board, Coras Iompair Eireann and Galway City Council, are preparing a master plan for the area which will include shopping centres, high rise buildings and hotels encompassing the train station, adjacent to the bus station and the fair green which will also link the harbour. On completion, there will be shopping centres, office blocks, apartments and hotels all interlinked with possible access via Eyre Square, the harbour and the CIE station in one entity. Galway City Council have identified this as an area where high rise buildings may be built especially overlooking the water.

THE HARBOUR BOARD
The Harbour Board has a large landbank of c. 32 acres overlooking Galway Bay and are in the process of developing these lands. Their objective is to provide facilities for tourism, aqua centres, cultural centres and perhaps a concert hall together with the shops, pubs, restaurants, and leisure amenities, residential and offices, etc. It is anticipated that the new inner dock will be included in the National Development Plan 2 and the whole area will be revitalised and a new port is to be constructed which will be able to accommodate liners, yachts, etc. We also understand that there is presently a 40,000 tonne oil terminal under construction.

N17 & N18
This road is to be known as the Atlantic Corridor and this will create a vertical road from the north of the country to the south of the country. The effect will be to release land banks in areas like Clarinbridge, Kilcolgan, Ardrahan. It will also open up access to Shannon Airport and reduce travel times to areas like Sligo and Limerick. The CPO process on the Athenry to Ennis Road has already commenced and this road is estimated to cost €430 million.

N.U.I.G.
One of the biggest building projects ever undertaken in an Irish university
is to be erected on the shores of the River Corrib in a €400m expansion for
NUI Galway.
The biggest single development — a €55m engineering centre — will be the largest engineering school in the country and will become an iconic building for the university and the city itself due to its innovative design and visibility from the Quincentenial Bridge.
Another of the more exciting projects is a proposal to build an extra court house for the city in conjunction with the courts service which would be linked with a new law school to allow students to have direct access in a very practical way as to how the law works. The public will benefit from an extended walkway around the Corrib, which will become the central focus of the university due to a new entrance from Newcastle Road and an upgraded road along the length of the river.
The bulk of the 20 projects over 260 acres of prime city centre land are likely to be completed within five years, with the entire ‘Campus of the Future’ scheduled to be opened by 2015. Some projects have already begun — among them the €22m sports centre featuring a 25m swimming pool and the €5m cultural centre with cinema, theatre and art gallery.

NEW BRIDGE OVER THE CORRIB
This is a highly significant part of the infrastructure. We presently have four bridges but primarily the Quincentennial Bridge takes the bulk of the traffic together with the Salmon Weir Bridge. The intersection at the Headford road is enormously busy and is a real bottle neck in Galway, by constructing this 5th bridge it will relieve all of this pressure, traffic will not have to enter the city centre and can travel on the ring road.

TYNAGH ENERGY
Tynagh Energy is building Galway’s first power generating station. The €300 million power plant will be a modern state of the art facility using the latest in advanced engineering technology. It will use the cleanest available fuel – natural gas- which will significantly reduce emissions of carbon dioxide. For the first time, Galway City and region will have a reliable and efficient source of power.

BROADBAND
The MAN (Metropolitan Area Network) managed by eNet has been installed around Galway and suppliers all kinds of cables to parks, hospital , companies now have a choice of supply choice and diversity.

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Galway is set to become the capital of research and development for biotechnology in Ireland. As Ireland has now become known as a knowledge based economy it is important for the development of stronger links between industry and academia, Galway with its 20,000 students is well planned to harness these changes.
The reputation of N.U.I.G. is highly regarded, primarily driven by research successes. N.U.I.G. is the home to numerous centres of excellence in the biological and biomedical sciences industry. It is also home to the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Science and the Digital Enterprise Research Institute. The Government is funding this research which has exceeded from €10m in 2000 to €50m annual funding today. NUI Galway has had a strong culture of innovation dating back to the early 1980’s when the first Irish small business incubation units were opened on campus. The new bioincubators complement the existing incubators and provide a focus for the commercialisation of the results of biotechnology research in the western region.
It is believed that Biotechnology will be one of the significant technologies of the early 21st century. Simply put it the application of knowledge about living organisms and their components to make new products and to develop new industrial processes. People have used Biotechnology for centuries for example fermentation processes (beer and wine) and food production using naturally occurring enzymes (cheese, yogurts, etc).
Modern Biotechnology has developed a range of techniques which are applied to commercial use. The US is the clear leader in development and commercialisation of modern Biotechnology with Europe following behind. The pace of change in biotechnology today is extraordinarily rapid. There are four categories of companies within Biotechnology – Agbio and environmental, biopharmaceuticals, Diagnostics and suppliers and services.
The Biopharmaceuticals sector is estimated to account for 70% of the total industry with 20% in food and 10% others. The government is committed to developing long term policies and investing in the key areas needed to sustain and grow the sector into the next generation. It also seeks to maximize the creation and nurture the development of new commercially focused early stage biotechnology companies in Ireland and Galway. It also seeks to target foreign origin biotechnology entrepreneurs and early stage companies with potential to establish in Ireland.
Galway’s biotechnology companies are Medtronic, Boston Scientific, Merit, Abbott, Creganna and Tyco healthcare. These companies have very significant research and development sections. Also in Galway we have the ICT sector which is Information Communication Technology, as Ireland has now become known as a knowledge based economy we have moved to a knowledge intensive business from a labour intensive business. What is required for this is 3rd or 4th year graduates keeping pace with the rapid growth of multi nationals. In this sector, we have APC, Sap, Fidelity, Cisco Systems, Oracle and Hewlett Packard and a recent announcement by Cisco created 200 jobs in Galway which was a superb win for IDA Ireland against stiff international competition. Cisco is regarded as the world wide leader in networking products and services and it is to establish a dedicated world class research and development in Galway with the support of the IDA. Cisco develops and sells networking and communication technology products and services for transporting data, voice and video to customers worldwide. The Galway centre will be an integral part of Cisco’s future world wide research and development activities. It will employ skilled graduates and is projected to grow to 200 positions over the next 3 years, employing people at degree level and above with a number of positions requiring master and PHD qualifications.
Many of these companies operate in a herd like mentality when they locate to one region. Galway now is very well represented with medical device companies, IT Companies, etc. It also has the added advantage of attracting key personnel to a region when they are many similar type companies. If, for example, an employee is to locate to a region, he would not be attracted by one company as if he is not successful in that work environment he can look outside to other similar companies in the same region.

thers even more the link is:

http://www.kmsgalway.com/menu.asp?menu=122&parent=0&item=0003
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galway in the future

Postby rob mc » Wed Feb 14, 2007 9:12 pm

i seen that there are barely any forums about Galway so i decided to start this one,
these are the plans for galway in the next 5 to 10 years

N6
The N6, estimated to cost €500 million, is presently at an advanced stage and the compulsory purchase of all lands is nearing completion, we understand all parts of this road will be under construction before the end of 2007. (The contracts have been awarded to the Spanish Giant Construction – P.J Hegarty Company. It is anticipated that this road will be open in 2010, largely impacting on areas like Kiltullagh, Athenry, Oranmore and the Ardaun Corridor.

GALWAY CITY OUTER BYPASS
The next phase will be the GCOB, the Galway City Outer Bypass, which involves the construction of 27km of roadway including the fifth bridge over the Corrib estimated to cost in the region of €340 million. The C.P.O. process has already begun on the road, which will commence at Briarhill/Garraun, continue north where it will cross the Tuam Road (N17) at Two Mile Ditch, travel in a westerly direction where there will be a major intersection at Ballindooley with the N84 Headford road.
This will open up access for areas like Corrandulla, Headford, etc. It will then continue west where it will cross over a new bridge on the Corrib at Menlo (this is very significant as it will be the 5th bridge over the Corrib), then continuing in a westerly direction towards Bushypark and dissecting Glenlo Abbey Golf Club, before crossing over the Moycullen Road (Junction A – benefiting Moycullen, Oughterard, etc.) and turning further west bypassing Knocknacarra and then emerging on the west side of Barna. It will be a dual-carriage and will be equivalent to a ring road around on the west/northern side of Galway City. This has huge implications for all of Galway. First of all, it will make commuting time from all of these areas much more accessible, creating serious opportunities for land development and providing further opportunities for house buyers, warehouses, commercial buildings, shopping centres and park and ride. Bearing in mind the continuation of the provision of the infrastructural services like sewer, water, energy and roads which will open up enormous development potential.
TRAIN STATION, HARBOUR AND C.I.E SITE
Ceannt station is about to be upgraded and C.I.E have a large land bank zoned C1 which is earmarked for the biggest development ever in Galway. It is proposed to construct a 600,000 sq.ft shopping centre which would be the second biggest enclosed shopping centre in Ireland after Dundrum. The total development will be 1,500,000 sq.ft or about €2 billion. A planning application is to be lodged for this in the summer of this year.

As it stands the project is now at an advanced stage with CIE and the Harbour Board, Coras Iompair Eireann and Galway City Council, are preparing a master plan for the area which will include shopping centres, high rise buildings and hotels encompassing the train station, adjacent to the bus station and the fair green which will also link the harbour. On completion, there will be shopping centres, office blocks, apartments and hotels all interlinked with possible access via Eyre Square, the harbour and the CIE station in one entity. Galway City Council have identified this as an area where high rise buildings may be built especially overlooking the water.

THE HARBOUR BOARD
The Harbour Board has a large landbank of c. 32 acres overlooking Galway Bay and are in the process of developing these lands. Their objective is to provide facilities for tourism, aqua centres, cultural centres and perhaps a concert hall together with the shops, pubs, restaurants, and leisure amenities, residential and offices, etc. It is anticipated that the new inner dock will be included in the National Development Plan 2 and the whole area will be revitalised and a new port is to be constructed which will be able to accommodate liners, yachts, etc. We also understand that there is presently a 40,000 tonne oil terminal under construction.

N17 & N18
This road is to be known as the Atlantic Corridor and this will create a vertical road from the north of the country to the south of the country. The effect will be to release land banks in areas like Clarinbridge, Kilcolgan, Ardrahan. It will also open up access to Shannon Airport and reduce travel times to areas like Sligo and Limerick. The CPO process on the Athenry to Ennis Road has already commenced and this road is estimated to cost €430 million.

N.U.I.G.
One of the biggest building projects ever undertaken in an Irish university
is to be erected on the shores of the River Corrib in a €400m expansion for
NUI Galway.
The biggest single development — a €55m engineering centre — will be the largest engineering school in the country and will become an iconic building for the university and the city itself due to its innovative design and visibility from the Quincentenial Bridge.
Another of the more exciting projects is a proposal to build an extra court house for the city in conjunction with the courts service which would be linked with a new law school to allow students to have direct access in a very practical way as to how the law works. The public will benefit from an extended walkway around the Corrib, which will become the central focus of the university due to a new entrance from Newcastle Road and an upgraded road along the length of the river.
The bulk of the 20 projects over 260 acres of prime city centre land are likely to be completed within five years, with the entire ‘Campus of the Future’ scheduled to be opened by 2015. Some projects have already begun — among them the €22m sports centre featuring a 25m swimming pool and the €5m cultural centre with cinema, theatre and art gallery.

NEW BRIDGE OVER THE CORRIB
This is a highly significant part of the infrastructure. We presently have four bridges but primarily the Quincentennial Bridge takes the bulk of the traffic together with the Salmon Weir Bridge. The intersection at the Headford road is enormously busy and is a real bottle neck in Galway, by constructing this 5th bridge it will relieve all of this pressure, traffic will not have to enter the city centre and can travel on the ring road.

TYNAGH ENERGY
Tynagh Energy is building Galway’s first power generating station. The €300 million power plant will be a modern state of the art facility using the latest in advanced engineering technology. It will use the cleanest available fuel – natural gas- which will significantly reduce emissions of carbon dioxide. For the first time, Galway City and region will have a reliable and efficient source of power.

BROADBAND
The MAN (Metropolitan Area Network) managed by eNet has been installed around Galway and suppliers all kinds of cables to parks, hospital , companies now have a choice of supply choice and diversity.

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
Galway is set to become the capital of research and development for biotechnology in Ireland. As Ireland has now become known as a knowledge based economy it is important for the development of stronger links between industry and academia, Galway with its 20,000 students is well planned to harness these changes.
The reputation of N.U.I.G. is highly regarded, primarily driven by research successes. N.U.I.G. is the home to numerous centres of excellence in the biological and biomedical sciences industry. It is also home to the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Science and the Digital Enterprise Research Institute. The Government is funding this research which has exceeded from €10m in 2000 to €50m annual funding today. NUI Galway has had a strong culture of innovation dating back to the early 1980’s when the first Irish small business incubation units were opened on campus. The new bioincubators complement the existing incubators and provide a focus for the commercialisation of the results of biotechnology research in the western region.
It is believed that Biotechnology will be one of the significant technologies of the early 21st century. Simply put it the application of knowledge about living organisms and their components to make new products and to develop new industrial processes. People have used Biotechnology for centuries for example fermentation processes (beer and wine) and food production using naturally occurring enzymes (cheese, yogurts, etc).
Modern Biotechnology has developed a range of techniques which are applied to commercial use. The US is the clear leader in development and commercialisation of modern Biotechnology with Europe following behind. The pace of change in biotechnology today is extraordinarily rapid. There are four categories of companies within Biotechnology – Agbio and environmental, biopharmaceuticals, Diagnostics and suppliers and services.
The Biopharmaceuticals sector is estimated to account for 70% of the total industry with 20% in food and 10% others. The government is committed to developing long term policies and investing in the key areas needed to sustain and grow the sector into the next generation. It also seeks to maximize the creation and nurture the development of new commercially focused early stage biotechnology companies in Ireland and Galway. It also seeks to target foreign origin biotechnology entrepreneurs and early stage companies with potential to establish in Ireland.
Galway’s biotechnology companies are Medtronic, Boston Scientific, Merit, Abbott, Creganna and Tyco healthcare. These companies have very significant research and development sections. Also in Galway we have the ICT sector which is Information Communication Technology, as Ireland has now become known as a knowledge based economy we have moved to a knowledge intensive business from a labour intensive business. What is required for this is 3rd or 4th year graduates keeping pace with the rapid growth of multi nationals. In this sector, we have APC, Sap, Fidelity, Cisco Systems, Oracle and Hewlett Packard and a recent announcement by Cisco created 200 jobs in Galway which was a superb win for IDA Ireland against stiff international competition. Cisco is regarded as the world wide leader in networking products and services and it is to establish a dedicated world class research and development in Galway with the support of the IDA. Cisco develops and sells networking and communication technology products and services for transporting data, voice and video to customers worldwide. The Galway centre will be an integral part of Cisco’s future world wide research and development activities. It will employ skilled graduates and is projected to grow to 200 positions over the next 3 years, employing people at degree level and above with a number of positions requiring master and PHD qualifications.
Many of these companies operate in a herd like mentality when they locate to one region. Galway now is very well represented with medical device companies, IT Companies, etc. It also has the added advantage of attracting key personnel to a region when they are many similar type companies. If, for example, an employee is to locate to a region, he would not be attracted by one company as if he is not successful in that work environment he can look outside to other similar companies in the same region.

if you would like to read more the link is:
http://www.kmsgalway.com/menu.asp?me...nt=0&item=0003
rob mc
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Location: Galway

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby PVC King » Mon Feb 19, 2007 10:04 pm

The merits for the outer bypass are far from proven and the real motivation behind the release appears to be opening up Connemara for more one off houses which the authors seem to do quite well out of; unfortunately the link you supplied doesn't work but the parent site also lists this


Sites for Sale

The opening of the Galway to Athenry commuter rail service and the concentration of industrial investment by the IDA in Oranmore is the way forward for Galway which if current development pattern persist will become entirely gridlocked in the centre if alternative settlement patterns are not adopted very soon.
PVC King
 

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby rob mc » Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:20 pm

come on you can do better than that what about galway clinic,ceannt station??,developments in oranmore,in perticular that new office block that was recently completed,the new 400 million euro NUIG developments and theres alot more where that came from
rob mc
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby PVC King » Thu Mar 22, 2007 9:46 pm

I hope there is a lot more to come; however I found that press release to be a particularly crude piece of cheerleading. The usual tripe talking up the market listing the entire wish list without apportioning an order of importance to the various projects.

I agree that great things are happening at UCG and the campus facilities really have underpinned a lot of very high end R & D units. I further agree that Ceannt offers an excellent opportunity along with the neighbouring docklands to create a model regeneration district at density.

Should the Ceannt \ Docklands area be combined with the Athenry rail and Arduan bus corridor then you have a very tight spatial plan that could make Galway a very efficient and high quality environment.

The alternative is the continuation of the one off 4 by 4 model underpinned by the outer bypass right through to Barna. That model will lead to chaos if not arrested.
PVC King
 

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby THE_Chris » Thu Mar 22, 2007 10:24 pm

There should not be a 40,000 tonne oil terminal built. Thats stupid, building it right next to the city. Build it somewhere else where oil trucks wont be sitting in traffic for ages.
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby galwayrush » Sat Mar 24, 2007 8:35 pm

Just read in the City Tribune that the Ceannt Station quarter will include two 16 storey buildings and five 8 storey buildings.Sounds promising, hopefully it will be something bold and exciting, but no signs of any plans available yet,
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby THE_Chris » Sat Mar 24, 2007 9:13 pm

I think too that Galway City Council should get their fingers out and upgrade the Bishop O Donnell / Seamus Quirke road. Plans have been out there for years, but its never started.
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby rob mc » Sun Mar 25, 2007 4:36 pm

that does sound promising gakway rush but i think there using ceannt startion as an exuse to build commericial and residential buildings rather than vastly improve the station its self and the overall traffic problems in Galway.But i suppose it would be cool to have a 16 storey building in Galway
rob mc
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby galwayrush » Sun Mar 25, 2007 6:56 pm

It would certainly fit in with the plan to extend the city towards the sea , by developing the 40 acres or so that the Harbour Board owns into high density commercial and residential and building the new Docklands from reclaimed land. It would create a " new city centre" with modern high density design and protect the charachter of the " old city centre"
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby Jammyd » Mon Mar 26, 2007 3:26 pm

i think its brilliant that galway is finally starting to consider building up rather than out,, this could be a great show case of galway as a modern city post celtic tiger. however, i presume it will take years for this to happen especially since any high rise development in galway is never welcomed. i can see the petitions start to roll in already :rolleyes:
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby galwayrush » Mon Mar 26, 2007 7:47 pm

Jammyd wrote:i think its brilliant that galway is finally starting to consider building up rather than out,, this could be a great show case of galway as a modern city post celtic tiger. however, i presume it will take years for this to happen especially since any high rise development in galway is never welcomed. i can see the petitions start to roll in already :rolleyes:

LOL, yes, the usual suspects are probably already lined up.:(
galwayrush
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Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby PVC King » Mon Mar 26, 2007 11:13 pm

It is entirely premature to predict the reaction to any scheme before it is lodged and people can have a look. If the City is offered a legoland it will be shot down. However if a design worthy of the City is proposed there is no doubt that the Bord will pass the scheme regardless of who says or signs what. It will be interesting to look at where the mass is sited and the legibility of the contribution to the City skyline. Whatever happens densities are set to increase dramatically and that is real progress whatever way you assess it. The real question is do the applicants go for a scheme that will clear first time out or do they do what both applicants for former CIE rail sites have done and deliberately ensure that the proposals are red carded first time out?
PVC King
 

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby galwayrush » Tue Mar 27, 2007 10:10 pm

Our Green Mayor is one of the objectors to the proposed Galway Outer By-Pass.:confused:
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