architecture of cork city

Re: architecture of cork city

Postby POM » Mon Jun 05, 2006 12:52 pm

kite wrote::(
It certainly would not be in my top ten either, neither would the building to its left with what I assume is a copper clad roof,

Now do we blame the developers for asking for this type of building, or the planners for allowing them?


I disagree, I think the Camden Court scheme is actually one of the better designed projects in Cork at the moment. The use of limestone and copper materials harks back to those associated with the city many years ago offering a pleasant variation from the boring brick finishes of the projects either side of it on John Street and Camden Wharf. Its height is respectful to the Georgian terrace houses fronting the quayside, it gradually steps back and up to 6-storeys in a manner considered of its location. The forms found at roof-level are an interesting break from the standard and frankly boring precendent found across so many of the city's developments - the flat, level roof-top. Thank your lucky stars this scheme was given the all-clear versus the previous proposal for the site.
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Re: Hive Iron Works, Hanover Street

Postby phil » Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:44 pm

lexington wrote::p I meant to post this up yesterday whilst posting images of the Kino redevelopment nearby - I came across this image on CorkSpace as reminded of how much I genuinely like this much overlooked building at the junction of Hanover Street and Washington Street. Though plans for a 9-storey office building at Clontarf Street, currently in planning, may relate more to that of the Flatiron Building in Manhattan in terms of height and effect, this historic structure stands as an affectionately thought of 'mini-version' of the famous Daniel Burnham-designed building.

Image
Copyright of CorkSpace
[/I]


I remember seeing this around this time last year. It is a little gem of a building as far as I am concerned. Thanks for posting it as a reminder Lexington.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby GregF » Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:02 pm

Kinda quirky isn't it.....but plenty of character...If that was in Dublin it would have been knocked down for road widening development.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby THE_Chris » Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:04 pm

Its an odd thing, yeah. But its placement next to two roads means you wouldnt really gain anything by levelling it :)
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby GrahamH » Tue Jun 06, 2006 6:08 pm

Indeed - a lovely building. It is curiosities like these that make urban spaces all the more interesting.

Is this a rendering or a photograph d d dallas?
Bizarre image!

http://www.archiseek.com/content/attachment.php?attachmentid=2379&stc=1&d=1149451566
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Postby lexington » Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:41 pm

phil wrote:I remember seeing this around this time last year. It is a little gem of a building as far as I am concerned. Thanks for posting it as a reminder Lexington.


My pleasure - again its a building I have a very soft spot for and feel it is too often overlooked. Must see if I can get a few images of the northern elevation (Washington Street frontage) up sometime.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby d_d_dallas » Tue Jun 06, 2006 8:45 pm

Graham,
it's a photo!
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby phatman » Tue Jun 06, 2006 11:46 pm

d_d_dallas wrote:Graham,
it's a photo!

Really? It's a reasonable question, that 'photo' looks like a still from Shrek or something. But anyway, shaping up better than I had anticipated. As for STW's Albert Quay attempt (seeing as these buildings tend to be grouped together - proximity?) I think enough has been said. But if not, It's not very good now is it. As for Hanover Street building, delightful, Cork is full of little gems like this, as much as it is full of crap. If only I can find a bit of time to get out there and take some pics, I'll let ye in on my faves.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby d_d_dallas » Wed Jun 07, 2006 11:53 am

Shrek... or John Hinde maybe.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby GrahamH » Wed Jun 07, 2006 5:35 pm

Madness! It looks like a photo of the location including the crane in the foreground, and the background replaced with an artist's impression!

You've some very weird light down there...
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby PTB » Fri Jun 16, 2006 11:35 pm

Hmmm...green light. Cue X-files music
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby phil » Mon Nov 27, 2006 1:09 pm

For those of you with an interest in recent architecture in Cork City, there is an article in the latest edition of Irish Arts Review that might interest you (Winter 2006).

Irish Arts Review wrote:'Recent Cork Architecture: Resurgence and Vision':
The redevelopment of Cork County Hall, together with a number of new collegiate buildings at UCC and CIT marks a period of economic vitality and renewed cultural confidence, argues Louise Cotter
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Re: Quaint Streets

Postby corkremembered » Sun Dec 17, 2006 3:12 am

lexington wrote:A fading sight in Irish urban areas - though I know a few still remain especially in Dublin. This terrace jumps on the unsuspecting stroller like a pleasant surprise along Dalton's Avenue, off Cornmarket Street. Unfortunately, at the time of this image's capture, Kerry Drain Services had lines of machinery and traffic cones closing off the avenue as part of investigations on drainage for Rockfell Investment's Cornmarket Street development nearby. If you can block out the foreground and take in the street, I think you'll agree it is rather charming. What I find most interesting is the lady in the centre of the image touching up the mosaic - community pride alive and well?

Image

Hi, Just to say that some of my family lived in this terrace of houses from the beginning of the 1900s, until 1987. The terrace is called Corporation Buildings (named because it was built for corporation workers I believe). The cornerstone of the building was placed in 1901. When my family lived in the Buildings, they lived on the first floor which was a 2 bedroomed flat with a cooker and sink at the top of the entrance stairs and a small toilet just past this "kitchen". The main living room had a door off leading to the first bedroom, and then a door from that one into the second. Wonder if anyone else has any photos of the place when it was first built? I only have a few family pictures and it did not look any different in the 1960s than it does now. It was a dismal place and in the early 1980s my great aunt was on TV discussing the damp and other problems the Buildings had. Even so, our family have great memories of the place.
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Re: Quaint Streets

Postby kite » Sun Dec 17, 2006 9:26 pm

corkremembered wrote:Hi, Just to say that some of my family lived in this terrace of houses from the beginning of the 1900s, until 1987. The terrace is called Corporation Buildings (named because it was built for corporation workers I believe). The cornerstone of the building was placed in 1901. When my family lived in the Buildings, they lived on the first floor which was a 2 bedroomed flat with a cooker and sink at the top of the entrance stairs and a small toilet just past this "kitchen". The main living room had a door off leading to the first bedroom, and then a door from that one into the second. Wonder if anyone else has any photos of the place when it was first built? I only have a few family pictures and it did not look any different in the 1960s than it does now. It was a dismal place and in the early 1980s my great aunt was on TV discussing the damp and other problems the Buildings had. Even so, our family have great memories of the place.



I may be mistaken but I think I recall reading in the local press that the wall to the rear of your great photo was damaged beyond repair along with serious damage to some of the houses during nearby construction.
I think the residents were put up in city hotels for quite some time until the area was made safe.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby ake » Wed Dec 27, 2006 10:58 pm

Here is that waterford bow front, now a fancy restaurant-december 2006

[ATTACH]3903[/ATTACH]
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby PTB » Sat May 26, 2007 5:21 pm

Just as a matter of interest, does anyone know what the oldest building in the city is?

Other than the city walls or anything of course.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby jungle » Mon May 28, 2007 9:19 am

PTB wrote:Just as a matter of interest, does anyone know what the oldest building in the city is?

Other than the city walls or anything of course.

I suppose it depends on your definition of building.

The Red Abbey is usually said to be the oldest building in the city, although it doesn't survive as a workable usable building.

In terms of buildings that are still in use, I don't know the answer. The oldest that springs to mind is the one that houses Cork Vision Centre, which dates from the 17th century. That would almost certainly be the oldest in the city centre as a number of floods and fires have destroyed so many buildings over time. It's possible that there is something older in the areas around Shandon/Blarney St on the Northside and Douglas St/Barrack St on the southside (actually Elizabeth Fort is probably older).

Going out into the suburbs and far suburbs, you have Carrigrohane Castle and Blarney Castle.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Devin » Wed Oct 08, 2008 1:01 am

Image

Image

What happened to the fine old buildings adjoining South Gate Bridge?
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Yossarian » Thu Oct 09, 2008 3:29 am

I'm looking forward to seeing that quayside cleaned up and accessable, will be a lovely area :)

no idea about the missing houses...
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby who_me » Thu Oct 09, 2008 7:37 pm

Whatever about the buildings, look at the state of the bridge and quay walls in those two photos. Pretty depressing.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby who_me » Thu Oct 09, 2008 7:38 pm

Devin wrote:What happened to the fine old buildings adjoining South Gate Bridge?


Interesting, and is that a clock-tower peering over the top of those buildings too - part of Beamish & Crawford?
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Devin » Thu Oct 09, 2008 9:13 pm

There must some old photos of the Beamish complex, or someone on the Cork threads who knows. The photo is only from the '60s.

Cork didn't have any of the insane road widening that was done in Dublin in its centre, but still when you look at the old photos, a fair bit of key fabric is gone here and there around the centre. That south end of South Main Street where it meets the bridge, as seen above, seems to have been blitzed. Shame. There's a Irish tradition of building tight up against bridges like that.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Devin » Tue Oct 14, 2008 5:38 pm

Image

Mid 2005




Image

Mid 2007




Image

Sept. 2008

I see the Parnell Place houses are finally being repaired. But should those top storeys really have been allowed to be cut down with the loss of the original fabric?



Image
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby GrahamH » Tue Oct 14, 2008 6:01 pm

Lovely sets of horns and sticky-backed glazing bars on the new windows there. I wouldn't have expected that at all.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Steady » Wed Oct 15, 2008 10:05 pm

Sept. 2008

I see the Parnell Place houses are finally being repaired. But should those top storeys really have been allowed to be cut down with the loss of the original fabric?


That project (Hotel on Beasley Street) seems to have been mothballed for now, or at least I cannot see any recent activity. I think the limestone cladding which faces south at high level looks very good from the City Hall direction.
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