Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PVC King » Fri Jan 27, 2006 2:05 pm

Summer sport road cycling
winter sport sand boarding and mountain biking;

I have in the past played rugby and soccer but no more.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby Paul Clerkin » Sat Jan 28, 2006 6:16 am

The Scotsman
Sat 28 Jan 2006

Low and behold
JESSICA KIDDLE
IN 1971 a book was published that sparked a craze for a new style of DIY building: the bungalow. Written by Irish architect Jack Fitzsimons, Bungalow Bliss was the first publication to give people the designs and know-how to build such a home for themselves. Soon bungalows were popping up all over the Irish countryside. It's obvious why the bungalow caught on so quickly - it was affordable, easy to construct and could be put up without the help of an architect.

However, these initial designs were also ugly, and 35 years later architects are still wondering what could have been built in their place. Bungalows were dismissed variously as "blots on the landscape" and "stunted, architecturally uninteresting little structures" by critics, but this weekend Glasgow architecture and design centre The Lighthouse gives the public a chance to decide what they think.


Bungalow Blitz, an exhibition celebrating these 1970s designs, showcases a series of images of the bungalows built from the book and examines the impact these self-built suburban low rises have had on the landscape.

Stuart MacDonald, the director of The Lighthouse, hopes that the images of the homes in Ireland will inspire people to think about architecture and the relationship buildings have with their surroundings closer to home.

He says: "There are parallels to be made between the west coast of Ireland and Scotland. Go to the Highlands or the west coast and there are lots of these boxes which have been put up with no thought to the surrounding landscape and without much design aspiration.

"You wouldn't get away with building houses like that today because they are so terribly ill-considered."

However, as much as Fitzsimons can be berated for popularising these one-storey wonders, he cannot be blamed for their invention. The bungalow is actually an import from India (the word originates from the Hindi word "Bangala" meaning "of Bengal") and these low, timber-frame kit builds were offered to the British men who served there in the 1800s.

It was a Colonel Bragg who built Britain's first bungalow in South London when he returned from India in the 1860s. Others quickly followed his example, with the seaside bungalow becoming popular with the holidaying middle classes. Yet more bungalows were constructed after the First World War when the government encouraged people to build their own homes in the countryside and, during the Second World War, these same bungalows provided shelter for families from London's East End looking to escape the Blitz.

As practical as they may have been, bungalows have never been considered a thing of beauty. Yet despite an often snobbish approach from architects and design experts, bungalows are more popular than ever.

A recent study by the building society Halifax says the humble bungalow makes the happiest home as it provides the perfect amount of floor space, privacy and garden area. And, despite making up only a small percentage of our housing stock, bungalows are among the most sought-after properties in the UK. Last year the Bank of Scotland reported that bungalows enjoyed the highest price growth in Scotland over the past ten years.

"Bungalows sell incredibly well," says solicitor Gavin Bain a director at the Aberdeen Solicitors' Property Centre. "They tend to be on extensive sites so are spacious and have sizeable gardens. Many of them tend to centre around one big living space with all the rooms coming off it, which fits in with the current trend for open-plan living. However, primarily they are popular with old people who love the fact that they are on one level."

Scottish homemakers seem to be particularly fond of the bungalow. According to Halifax, 7 per cent of new homes north of the Border are of the one-storey variety compared with a national average of just 3 per cent.

Despite what designers say, the bungalow does appear to have won a place in the heart of the nation and, as MacDonald points out, thanks to some new developments even architects are warming to them.

"There is nothing wrong with the idea of a bungalow per se, it's just that the design quality and the building's relationship with the surrounding area has always been poor," he says, "However, people are becoming more demanding and there is a growing realisation that building homes that fit in with the landscape doesn't have to be expensive, so the stereotypical image of a bungalow is changing. There are several architects who have started designing bungalows that take the geography and the kind of materials that should be used into consideration so they are no longer such an intrusion."

One of these firms is Dualchas, a firm of architects on the Isle of Skye which specialises in designing one-off houses for rural Scotland. Its designs often take the form of the traditional west-coast one-storey longhouse. "We have to be careful that what happened in Ireland doesn't happen here - we have to make sure we have a more appropriate quality of housing," says architect Neil Stephen, a partner at the firm. "We live in a beautiful country and no longer have to accept mediocrity and destroy the landscape. The houses we build are based on traditional designs but are also site specific so they always blend in. It's not housing that ruins a landscape, but inappropriate housing, and we have a responsibility not to let that happen in our communities."

If more architects and builders think like Neil Stephen, one day there may be an exhibition that celebrates, rather than laments, the rise of bungalow living. Until then there are always the pictures of the bungalow boxes in Ireland to remind everyone how not to do it. sm

n The Bungalow Blitz exhibition runs until 26 March at The Lighthouse, 11 Mitchell Lane, Glasgow. Tickets cost £3 for adults and £1 for children and concessions. For more information, tel: 0141-221 6362 or visit the website at http://www.thelighthouse.co.uk

This article: http://news.scotsman.com/features.cfm?id=138602006
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby MT » Sun Jan 29, 2006 4:06 am

Until then there are always the pictures of the bungalow boxes in Ireland to remind everyone how not to do it.


I think that line highlights a growing concern around the world at the state of development in Ireland. I've read newspaper articles and witnessed the shock of visitors to Ireland on the disfiguration that's taken place. Given another few decades and I believe Ireland's growing reputation of a visually destroyed landscape will have become firmly cemented [pun intended] in the minds of those who'd see us as an awful example of how not to do it.

The irony of all this is that the much longer industrialised Britain, famous for the density of its population, may well in the long run end up with the most attractive and least spoilt landscapes of the two islands. Like English tourists coming here in decades past, will future Irish generations be going on vacations to our nearest neighbour to witness unspoilt rural scenery. 'Look kids, the lake district's just what Ireland once resembled back in the 20th century'.

Will Irish tourists be taken on special wilderness tours of the Peak district?! ;)

-----------------------
That's right folks, book now for the trip of a lifetime: green fields, wide open spaces - it all awaits you in quaint old rural England. Can you cope with going ten miles without seeing a housing development, not even a bungalow? Well then, this is the adventure holiday of a lifetime you've been waiting for!

Get back to nature, get in touch with the British countryside.

Brought to you by ruralescapes.com, 70,001 unit, Brian Boru business park, Dublin 200, Beara peninsula suburb.
------------------------
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby Aoife1 » Sun Feb 05, 2006 10:49 pm

http://www.visual-culture.com/project/bungalow/front_page

I love the picture of the farm house (gable to the road) crumbling sadly as the bungalow rises from the hill to boldly face the road.

Had a lot of discussion about this when working on the Bunaglwo Blitz: Another History of Irish Architecture proejct - the idea of road facing, and, even more specifically why you would want a hugh (and I quote Kevin Myers) plateglass airport window facing the road (and maybe the view) when what you do once its built is put the back of the couch up against it, turn your back adn watch the TV - all of this to be shared with passers by ....

I've attached an image form one the the BB exhibitions - it shows a life size sculpture based on Plan No.8 from the 1st edition of the book (Bungalwo Bliss) and tarpaulin photos of the builders....
Attachments
IMG_1952.JPG
IMG_1952.JPG (217.37 KiB) Viewed 2993 times
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby Devin » Wed Feb 08, 2006 2:00 am

The town of Totnes in Devon, UK (below) - an example of what is so rarely seen in Ireland anymore - a sharply defined relationship between a town and its surrounding landscape. Here, the hillside in the distance would be splattered with development.

This is going to become the critical planning and development issue of the next couple of decades in Ireland: how to extend our towns and villages coherently – it already is a big issue. The one-off housing controversy is not going to go away just because restrictions on building them have been relaxed. As the countryside becomes more and more disfigured by houses and as the social and environmental problems of them mount it’s all going to come to a big head again. We will realise that we have two settlement strategies flying in opposite directions to each other (the encouragement of higher densities and consolidation of urban centres on one hand, and the encouragement of the proliferation of dispersed housing on the other).

As MT said, at the current rate we will soon be going on holidays in the UK to see the likes of this:

Image
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PVC King » Tue Apr 04, 2006 7:29 pm

Ireland too dependent on imported oil - report

April 04, 2006 16:41
A Forfas report today says that Ireland is more dependent on imported oil for our transport and energy requirements than almost every other European country. It also states that it will take up to ten years to significantly reduce this dependence.

The report - A Baseline Assessment of Ireland's Oil Dependence: Key Policy Considerations - says that Ireland consumed nine million tonnes of oil in 2004, an amount that has doubled since 1990. The country was ranked third highest among the EU 25 countries in terms of oil consumed per capita in 2002.

Electricity generation and transportation are the two main factors for the country's high oil dependence. The country has the sixth most dependent electricity generation system of the entire European Union. The amount of oil used for transportation in Ireland tripled between 1972 and 2002, which leaves us consuming at least 50% more per capita than the average of the EU.


Today's Forfas report says that recent developments in the global oil industry have resulted in many countries having to evaluate their overall dependence on oil and the effect on their economies. Threats to security of supply, increasing global demand, slowing rates of new oil discoveries and rising oil prices have become major concerns.

The concept of oil peak - where oil production reaches a point where it can no longer be increased - has also become ever more important in recent years.

The findings of today's report suggest that Ireland needs to develop a national strategy to prepare for the challenge of peak oil. It urges pro-active measures including the possibility of developing nuclear energy as a more long term solution.

The report urges the introduction of initiatives to reduce the use of oil in transportation, by bringing about the replacement over time of the existing stock of vehicles with more fuel efficient ones and the provision of alternative modes of transport than run on electricity rather than petrol related fuels. The potential use of biofuels for transportation should also be investigated.

It also says that Ireland should consider the use of renewable energy sources for electricity generation, such as wind, wave and tidal energy.

Options to address supply concerns that may arise in the context of peak oil should also be assessed. These include expanding domestic oil storage capabilities and making deals with oil producing countries that continue to have a surplus of production relative to their domestic requirements.

'The high probability that a supply of cheap oil will peak over the next ten to 15 years poses a serious challenge for the global economy,' commented CEO of Forfas, Martin Cronin.

'As peaking is encountered, liquid fuel prices could increase dramatically and governments, businesses and economies could face significant economic and social change,' he added.

'Ireland is more dependent on imported oil for our transport and energy requirements than almost every other European country. It is essential that we now begin to prepare for such a challenge,' he concludes.

Forfas is the national body responsible for providing policy advice to the Government on enterprise, trade, science, technology and innovation here.


http://www.rte.ie/business/2006/0404/forfas.html
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PDLL » Wed Apr 05, 2006 1:50 pm

Interesting, TP, that you chose to post this article on a thread on one-off houses, despite the fact that it has as much relevance to say inner-city life in Dublin. Would it not have been equally as appropriate to post it on the thread on cylcing in Irish cities or open a new one on a topic such as 'Public Transport in Irish Cities and Towns' or 'Electrifying the Dublin Bus Network' or 'Widescale development of 50m high power-generating windmills around the Irish coast'. No, none of those options would have been suitable as they wouldn't have helped stigmatize by circumstantial conjecture and stereotypical association your particular view of those who choose to live in the Irish countryside. That, afterall, is surely the reason you chose to dig out the Eogahn Harris thread as the most appropriate location for this post.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PVC King » Wed Apr 05, 2006 1:56 pm

Proportionatley the Chelsea Tractors that service our ever growing rural suburbs have a much greater impact as you well know
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby Aidan » Wed Apr 05, 2006 2:17 pm

despite the fact that it has as much relevance to say inner-city life in Dublin


Nope, our spatially dispersed population base, made worse by the spread of one off housing is directly related to our dependence on cars, and thus fossil fuels, for transport. Critical masses of population facilitate more environmentally sustainable modes of transport that reduce our reliance on fossil fuels. Its not viable to provide such solutions to areas with widely dispersed populations.

circumstantial conjecture


Its not circumstantial or conjecture, its fact. You might not like it, but that does not change either the economics or the physics of the subject.

stereotypical association


Actually no. The main focus on one offs on this site has primarily been the landscape effects of this phenomenon (as you might expect on an architecture forum), with a secondary emphasis on planning (mainly from non architect types). The energy policy implications of wilfully dispersing ones population across the lanscape is a relatively undiscussed facet of this problem. The article belongs as much here as it does anywhere else.

Seriously PDLL, are you just trolling for debate, or do you actually believe what you're saying?
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby Seosmacc » Wed Apr 05, 2006 2:53 pm

I used to live in a one off house in the countryside. It was a pre-exisitng bungalow which I bought in the late 1980s. Not the most lovely of structures, but I have planted native trees on the site, restored the hedgerow that was destroyed (by order of the planners) to create parking at the front of the site, and now the building cannot be seen at all from the road. All that is there is a gap in the hedge. I still live in that house but now the area has filled with new dormer bungalows. Each one is a short few metres from the road, There is no screening planting in front of the houses, and indeed many have uplights to make sure we can't miss their palaces even in the dark of night. Almost none of these houses were built by individuals who wanted to live in the countryside (3 miles from Moycullen, 10 from Galway City.) The houses were built by the farmers that owned the land to make a fast buck. These people are now extremely rich. They continue to build rows of identical houses on 0.5 acre sites, and the roads are turning into streets. The people that live in these houses are rarely seen in their gardens, or walking the roads, or even socializing locally. They are townies that can't afford town houses. It is all very strange. Planners should demand that individual houses are built by individuals with a demonstratable reason for country living, Such houses should be completely invisable to people trying to enjoy the countryside, No one goes driving in west Galway to look at my house therefore I should make it as unobtrusive as possible. I feel you shouldn't tar all owners of bungalows with the same brush. Many people do have a need to live in a rural areas If planners don't like what they live in then up the standards, don't accept rubbish. Having said that the latest lot of houses to go up are quite attractive, and alot of the old bungalow stock is being rebuilt into attractive looking dwellings,
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PDLL » Wed Apr 05, 2006 3:00 pm

Thomond Park wrote:Proportionatley the Chelsea Tractors that service our ever growing rural suburbs have a much greater impact as you well know


If by Chelsea Tractors you mean 4x4s, then you should read this article on 4x4 ownership in London which I posted months ago in the thread on Ballymun:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/london/4697246.stm

Shame you didn't familiarise yourself with the fact that 4x4 ownership is largely an urban phenomenon. Oddly enough, though, I don't hear anyone saying that they should be banned and that other city dwellers should only be allowed 1.1. Litre engine cars as that would largely satisfy the selfish transport needs of most Irish city dwellers. I wonder why no one argues for this - could it be that they would not like that level of Government control over their right to express some basic personal preferences such as the car one drives.

As pointed out before, cars standing still in slow moving traffic release significantly more amounts of Carbon Monoxide into the environment than cars moving at a modertae pace on clear roads. Hence, Aidan, it is very reasonable to argue that the cars sitting in Dublin's rush-hour traffic jams are causing as much if not more damage to the environment than those cruising fluidly along the nation's regional and rural roads.

To demonstrate this fact, please see attached a table from the EPA showing air quality recordings around Ireland. Oops, the rural areas seem to be winning on this one while Dublin with its oft-reported and much stressed critical population mass for widespread public transport seems to be lagging behind quite significantly.

http://www.epa.ie/OurEnvironment/Air/AirQualityBulletins/

Could it be that car-usage in the Dublin city area is more damaging to the environment than the effects of car usage in such rural one-off dominated areas as Co. Mayo and Co Louth. Now that doesn't fit so nicely with the tehsis you present Aidan.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PVC King » Wed Apr 05, 2006 3:45 pm

PDDL;

you just don't give up; as we all know there is little relation between Urban London and Rural Ireland in that in London you have access to one of the most advanced public transport systems in the World.

In many parts of recently suburbanised rural Ireland one needs an off road vehicle because the roads are so poor and for reasons of pure comfort given the commuting distances invovled.


In respect of your EPA article no-one has ever alleged localised air-pollution in recently suburbanised rural areas; however when people commence journeys in recently suburbanised rural areas with a destination in urban areas the mode of transport is generally single occupancy cars / Chelsea Tractors so there are certain cross over externalities as well as higher fuel consumption on a national basis.



Seosmacc wrote:I used to live in a one off house in the countryside. It was a pre-exisitng bungalow
I still live in that house but now the area has filled with new dormer bungalows. Almost none of these houses were built by individuals who wanted to live in the countryside (3 miles from Moycullen, 10 from Galway City.) The houses were built by the farmers that owned the land to make a fast buck. Planners should demand that individual houses are built by individuals with a demonstratable reason for country living,



This is a very balanced post which in my opinion very accurately reflects the situation on the ground.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby magicbastarder » Wed Apr 05, 2006 5:12 pm

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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby Aidan » Wed Apr 05, 2006 5:26 pm

For this;
Hence, Aidan, it is very reasonable to argue that the cars sitting in Dublin's rush-hour traffic jams are causing as much if not more damage to the environment than those cruising fluidly along the nation's regional and rural roads.


See this ...
however when people commence journeys in recently suburbanised rural areas with a destination in urban areas the mode of transport is generally single occupancy cars / Chelsea Tractors so there are certain cross over externalities as well as higher fuel consumption on a national basis.


In otherwords, those journeys starting in urban areas are much more likely to occur on public transport, if you start your journey in a one off house in South Co Kildare, or Longford, or Louth, you will spend as much time sitting in traffic at Newlands Cross (or whereever) as you will moving fluidly 'anywhere'. Its the same cars that do both. Whether you like it or not, job creation is primarily a function of urban areas right now. Many people have to get to centres to work, very little traffic, relatively speaking, goes from point to point in rural Ireland.

Crticially, it is possible to serve people in urban areas with public transport as is happening (slowly) in Dublin and Cork. The same cannot be said if you live in a one off house. With an urban (or at least nucleated settlement pattern) such a development is possible, without it, you are effectively locked into a pattern of development premised on low fuel costs. Not such a good idea,
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PDLL » Tue May 16, 2006 9:41 am

One of the arguments frequently used to argue against the developments of one-offs is the social isolation argument - one-offs simply lead to a break down of social interconnection, resulting in a sense of isolation and depression. Interesting then that Google Trends has found that Dublin tops the world league of loneliness - surely this undermines the social isolationist argument against one-offs and supports the position I have noted on previous occasions that holds that people who live in mass monotonous suburban estates that lack any sense of individuality or creativity are more inclined to feel socially isolated.

Please check out the results:

http://www.google.com/trends?q=lonely&ctab=0&geo=all&date=all

http://edition.cnn.com/2006/TECH/internet/05/15/ireland.lonely.reut/index.html
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby KerryBog2 » Tue May 16, 2006 10:09 am

PDLL I cannot see how "social isolation" can be extrapolated from these figures. The article is neither well written nor properly researched. If you Google Trends for "Lonely Planet" the results will show almost the same ranking for the top five cities. Look at the time of year, exams will soon be over and lots of students will be off on their travels.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby lunasa » Tue May 16, 2006 11:18 am

I put in the word 'fun' and Romania came out tops. Gee, say that to the street kids.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PDLL » Tue May 16, 2006 11:20 am

Then by that logic, KerryBog2, Dubliners must be the most eager travellers in the world or else are very ardent Beetles fans. Equally so, by that logic, if you type in 'planet' you should also get a comparable result - but you don't. (Check the comparative search function provided by Google - there is no correlation whatsoever). Given that it is extremely unlikely that one would merely type in 'lonely' when searching Google for 'lonely planet' and confident that the combined analytical resources of CNN and Reuters have probably probed this issue a little deeper prior to making their conclusion, it is not unreasonable to consider this as potentially having some validity.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PDLL » Tue May 16, 2006 11:26 am

Perhaps the Romanians are craving after fun and that is why they seek it on the internet. Maybe this means that Dubliners are so social that they carve after loneliness and seek it on the internet. Ya, I agree KerryBog2, on reflection the whole thing is damned dodgy. Mind you, I hold by my argument that living in a monotonuous, bland, mass produced house in an estate is a recipe for social unhappiness and isolation. Guess I will just have to continue to look to the Victorians for evidence to support my argument.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby phil » Tue May 16, 2006 11:49 am

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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PDLL » Tue May 16, 2006 11:56 am

Interesting. It appears that Reuters are not a very reliable source of journalistic research - many will be shocked by that. The results are also interesting - it seems that Irish people and Australians are very eager to travel. I wonder what the reason behind the potential mass exodus from Dublin could be. I really wonder.
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby phil » Tue May 16, 2006 11:57 am

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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PVC King » Tue May 16, 2006 12:16 pm

Phil,

Very interesting; Ireland with one offs all over the shop is the most lonely and Singapore one of the most planned and most inhabitabited places by density is second.

Sounds about as relevant as the observation our security guard read in a book yesterday 'People leaving a mortury are more likely to give money to charity' needless to say the book was binned

PDDL

Address sustainability, transport efficiency, landscape and habitat destruction and you may be taken seriously;

now back to my holiday
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby phil » Tue May 16, 2006 12:20 pm

[quote="Thomond Park"]Phil,

Very interesting]

exactly
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Re: Eoghan Harris on one-off housing

Postby PDLL » Tue May 16, 2006 12:33 pm

TP - address personal choice in a free and democratic society, a non-Dublin-centric vision of the countryside, the failure of architects and building developers to offer Joe Soap any real and affordable alternative to urban living other than life in a monotous and much-replicated plaster-board box that encapsulates the creative imagination of a brain dead chimp, the excessive use of inappropriately large engined vehicles in urban environments, the lack of proper childrens' play areas in our towns, and it goes on. Until real and imaginative alternatives that provide some scope for human individuality are built in our cities, one-offs will remain, as they are, the preferred option by many of Ireland's citizens.
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