The "Language" of drawing

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The "Language" of drawing

Postby Teppic » Fri May 06, 2005 12:44 pm

As a second year student, i seem to have hit a bit of barrier. I understand that technical drawing is in essence, one method of describing various characteristics inherit in a building, my tutor then told me that to display other elements or characteristics in a design, then you must use or create a new "language". What I have trouble with is creating or understanding these languages, I mean we've all seen really beautiful drawings that (to me anyway) are hugely unreadable, but very aesthetic. What sort of choices influence these drawings? Are there any examples of architects who are well known for this?

Also, can anyone suggest any student orientated architecture sites, with information and discussions?

Thanks!
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Re: The "Language" of drawing

Postby Frank Taylor » Fri May 06, 2005 2:16 pm

Try to get a copy of 'A Pattern Language' by Christopher Alexander.
ISBN 0-19-501919-9
OUP, 1977

You could also get a book that describes the rules used to build Greek temples. Or find a website that lists the guidelines for Doric, Ionic and Corinthian orders
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Re: The "Language" of drawing

Postby rajiv » Wed May 25, 2005 8:35 pm

Frank Taylor wrote:Try to get a copy of 'A Pattern Language' by Christopher Alexander.
ISBN 0-19-501919-9
OUP, 1977

You could also get a book that describes the rules used to build Greek temples. Or find a website that lists the guidelines for Doric, Ionic and Corinthian orders


what help will be got by a pattern language in direction of drawing there are only sketches and photographs of spaces. i dont see any architectural drawing in that
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Re: The "Language" of drawing

Postby Kitten » Wed Aug 31, 2005 7:10 am

Hey,

I'm a third year architecture student.

There are lots of great books around that show different ways of representing projects. For the basic stuff there are drafting books by Ching: these are excellent and sometimes you can buy them second hand. If you are working on theories currently being developed, you can also get representational cues from magazines. It's always great if you can find a project that has similarities with yours and learn from how it is portrayed. Detail, Architectural Record, all this stuff is great.

Web sites are good too: Archinect has a gallery of images you can look through and there is are student web logs which sometimes show projects. Zaha Hadid has a great site: also, if you look at awards sites you can see the images from winners and runners up.

Good luck! Representation is a bitch and I always have trouble with it!

Kitten.
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Re: The "Language" of drawing

Postby dzineminded » Thu Sep 01, 2005 8:51 pm

Listen to the kitten! If you havnt picked up Ching's "Form, Space, and Order", you better. If your professors havnt recommended it, they will. It is a bible for developing a drawing technique. You will need this and his other works are very helpful. This will get you familiar with the basics of hand drawing. You can then take this and start developing your language. I wouldnt say that he means to develop a language, but more your language. The hardest part I feel is trying to maintain the technical aspects of the drawing while presenting a pleasing image. Keep in mind, many times the problem is not your language but your project. Drawings should speak for themselves, you shouldnt have to work to get your drawing to read. My principle architect once mentioned that many architects which review work will put their finger at the bottom middle of the page and let his vision bleed to the top corners. If the building is heavy and unbalanced it will be easily seem and they will scratch that plan. This just goes to show that no matter how good the detail of the drawing looks, the plan must be in order. Good Luck!
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