architecture of cork city

Re: architecture of cork city

Postby lexington » Sat Jun 18, 2005 2:50 pm

I very stupidly deleted Post #22 by editing rather than quoting it - but at least the Grand Parade/RBS images are up.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby jungle » Sun Jun 19, 2005 10:34 am

jungle wrote:As for architecture in Cork, does anyone have any decent pictures of the GPO in Cork?


After asking that, I find a picture on this site. I don't thing the picture really does the building justice, but it would take some seriously expensive camera equipement to take the shot I'd like to see.

Image
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Boyler » Sun Jun 19, 2005 11:35 am

From this picture, you'd think the GPO was small and nothing special.
It would be nice to start a thread about Galway city and county, don't you agree?
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Devin » Mon Jun 20, 2005 4:46 am

ctesiphon wrote:Devin...Is the bow-fronted building in Waterford the one a few doors down from the Tower Hotel?
Yes. I have also heard it's been refurbished & that the magnificent windows with their slender doric-columed mullions have been repaired and retained :) .

Here it was in a sorry state in 2002 - it had sat vacant like this for many years, I understand:

Image


The overhang in the sashes was still very lucid after 200 years:

Image
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby bunch » Mon Jun 20, 2005 9:17 am

that bow-fronted building on the mall, waterford was completely rebuilt following demolition recently - i'm almost sure the entire building was taken down - it is also seen as being significant because it was the frst building that the irish tricolour was flown - by thomas francis meagher - who now has a new home outside the tower hotel
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby GrahamH » Mon Jun 20, 2005 5:46 pm

Thomas Francis Meagher or the flag? :)

What an unusual feature those columns are - always great to see curved sashes too.
Presumably if the building was completely rebuilt it was in danger of collapse - and also the wndows and internal features were salvaged?
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Devin » Tue Jun 21, 2005 1:25 am

Presumably if the building was completely rebuilt it was in danger of collapse
So it seems. I hadn't realised it yesterday when I posted those pictures, but I've made further inquiries & it's true what bunch says; the building was taken down and rebuilt. Apparently it had a lot of structural timber which had deteriorated, and was generally past the point of being repaired and stabilised.

But the bit about the sashes is true; they've been reused in the new building...I have to go down to Waterford now and see that....
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby lexington » Tue Jun 21, 2005 10:36 am

Image Image

Those Grand Parade slate/bow buildings I promised (Moloney Solicitors/Property Team among others). Not the best images but you get the idea.
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Quaint Streets

Postby lexington » Tue Jun 21, 2005 1:26 pm

A fading sight in Irish urban areas - though I know a few still remain especially in Dublin. This terrace jumps on the unsuspecting stroller like a pleasant surprise along Dalton's Avenue, off Cornmarket Street. Unfortunately, at the time of this image's capture, Kerry Drain Services had lines of machinery and traffic cones closing off the avenue as part of investigations on drainage for Rockfell Investment's Cornmarket Street development nearby. If you can block out the foreground and take in the street, I think you'll agree it is rather charming. What I find most interesting is the lady in the centre of the image touching up the mosaic - community pride alive and well?

Image
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby anto » Tue Jun 21, 2005 1:44 pm

Nice terrace alright. Pity about the wheely bins though. They're a blight on a lot of terraced houses now. Reminds me of an area behind the Cinema in Dun Laoghaire
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Andrew Duffy » Wed Jun 22, 2005 10:19 am

Quite a Northwest England feel to that terrace. Is it a railway embankment at the end?
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby tjomeara » Fri Jun 24, 2005 5:33 pm

[

(Waterford City, NIAH, mid- to late 1990s, unpublished- do I detect a pattern?)[/QUOTE]

Waterford City was published as part of the Waterford County Survey in late 2003/early 2004
Cork City has just been published and can be found at http://www.buildingsofireland.ie
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby ctesiphon » Fri Jun 24, 2005 6:37 pm

tjomeara wrote:
Waterford City was published as part of the Waterford County Survey in late 2003/early 2004
Cork City has just been published and can be found at http://www.buildingsofireland.ie


TJ-

Was the full Waterford City survey published, or was it just the old NIAH chestnut of a 'representative sample'? If memory serves, there were roughly 2000 records in the original survey, which is more than the full county survey now contains.

Cheers.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby tjomeara » Fri Jun 24, 2005 7:05 pm

Ctesiphon

The NIAH are only publishing structures on the web that are considered to be of 'Regional' importance and above. Search for Waterford under the 'town' in the Waterford Survey on the NIAH website. I think around 900 sites were rated as being of 'Regional' importance and above in and around Waterford City.
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Postby lexington » Fri Jun 24, 2005 7:48 pm

:) This building may not strike you as much on first glance, but to those of you familiar with the junction of North Main Street, Castle Street and Paradise Place - you may remember that corner house between North Main Street and Castle Street. For years this building has been smothered in a series of unflattering and dogish paint coats. From Mustard Yellow to Tangerine. Thankfully the building's proprietors enlisted Shane Construction to given the fading glory of this structure a new lease on life. The fabulous traditional brickwork has been revealed once again, the details of the design uncovered, the history reborn - unfortunately the image below fails to focus the individual brickwork and so on, however, I will try to get a better quality image in the future. The building reflects the refurbishment of nearby Fenn's Quay - among Ireland's oldest original terraced houses still in full show. It begs questions as to what lies beneath the unsightly paint skins of other surrounding structures?

Congratulations to Shane Construction who did a fine job on the conservation exercise - I hear the upper floors have been returned to former glories and would love an opportunity to expect the building first hand. :D(?) It's worth noting the shop-front has been alter to a far more suitable, less tacky style - I believe large yellow 'Smile Faces' with large white and red cartoon fonts had adorned this building for quite some period - the retail units operated as a mobile phone covers store.

I think anyone familiar with this building, and what had gone before it, will appreciate the refurbished form.

Image

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Andrew Duffy - regarding Dalton's Avenue, no, the terrace abuts a former warehousing facility (in the same ye olde red brick style) - which is now being redeveloped by Rockfell Investments.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby ctesiphon » Mon Jun 27, 2005 4:30 pm

tjomeara wrote:Ctesiphon

The NIAH are only publishing structures on the web that are considered to be of 'Regional' importance and above. Search for Waterford under the 'town' in the Waterford Survey on the NIAH website. I think around 900 sites were rated as being of 'Regional' importance and above in and around Waterford City.


TJ-

Thanks for that clarification- though I'd be of the opinion that in order to decide what buildings are Regional, it is necessary to survey everything first, not just the ones that appear to be Regional on a cursory inspection. But then again, I'd be of the old school where the NIAH methodology is concerned, and we all know how much got published in the (ahem) formative years... :rolleyes:
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby ctesiphon » Mon Jun 27, 2005 4:36 pm

lexington wrote::) Thankfully the building's proprietors enlisted Shane Construction to given the fading glory of this structure a new lease on life. The fabulous traditional brickwork has been revealed once again, the details of the design uncovered, the history reborn - unfortunately the image below fails to focus the individual brickwork and so on, however, I will try to get a better quality image in the future. The building reflects the refurbishment of nearby Fenn's Quay - among Ireland's oldest original terraced houses still in full show. It begs questions as to what lies beneath the unsightly paint skins of other surrounding structures?


I'm wondering, did this building benefit from sponsored shroud advertising, or was the work carried out without such input, i.e. by an enlightened client? (Ref. thread below.)

http://www.archiseek.com/content/showthread.php?t=4024
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby sw101 » Mon Jun 27, 2005 4:57 pm

nice segue.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby tjomeara » Mon Jun 27, 2005 6:34 pm

ctesiphon wrote:TJ-

Thanks for that clarification- though I'd be of the opinion that in order to decide what buildings are Regional, it is necessary to survey everything first, not just the ones that appear to be Regional on a cursory inspection. But then again, I'd be of the old school where the NIAH methodology is concerned, and we all know how much got published in the (ahem) formative years... :rolleyes:


Yeah, that's it ctesiphone. A full survey takes years and in that time many structures would be lost. The NIAH are currently involved in a primary, rapid survey for each county. It is in no way a definitive list. After the initial survey is complete I would imagine a more thorough national one will follow. All a matter of stages...
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby lexington » Mon Jun 27, 2005 10:01 pm

ctesiphon wrote:I'm wondering, did this building benefit from sponsored shroud advertising, or was the work carried out without such input, i.e. by an enlightened client? (Ref. thread below.)

http://www.archiseek.com/content/showthread.php?t=4024


No such advertising ctesiphon - the brickwork really is attractive. As I said, it's difficult to make out the detail in the posted image. It's amazing to see what had been hidden under so much tack for so many years. I would actively encourage other proprietors along North Main Street and South Main Street (2 of Cork's oldest streets by far) to embrace the same revitalisation of their buildings.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby GrahamH » Tue Jun 28, 2005 1:13 am

It's looking a bit shell-shocked after that stripping down - as buildings tend to :)

The cornice looks very strange up there in the context of the brick work; presumably left over from the plastering job?
Attractive nonetheless, and an especially welcome retention if helps convey the architectural history of the building.

lexington wrote:Image


Where did the idea for the green paint come from though - is it left over from pre-restoration?! It's kinda quirky all the same, but perhaps a cream scheme, matching the render band above the ground floor would look just that bit better :)

The sashes in this pic appear to have no horns which make them a bit clinical-looking - maybe they are extant and visible in 'real life'.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Radioactiveman » Tue Jun 28, 2005 2:45 am

Here's a picture of this building prior to recent renovation. I believe from late 2003.
<img src="http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/images/survey_specific/fullsize/20500550_2.jpg">
I think lex may have exagerated the condition it was in previously:
"For years this building has been smothered in a series of unflattering and dogish paint coats. From Mustard Yellow to Tangerine."

Also, here's some more images of the GPO on Oliver Plunkett Street.
<img src="http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/images/survey_specific/fullsize/20514124_1.jpg">
<img src="http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/images/survey_specific/fullsize/20514124_3.jpg">
<img src="http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/images/survey_specific/fullsize/20514124_2.jpg">

And while i'm at it, an image of more bow-fronted buildings. This time on the Grand Parade end of Oliver Plunkett Street (No's 76 and 77)..
<img src="http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/images/survey_specific/fullsize/20514165_1.jpg">

Finally, a fabulous building further down the street. A remnant of an industrial past.
<img src="http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/images/survey_specific/fullsize/20513015_1.jpg">
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby GrahamH » Tue Jun 28, 2005 3:06 am

Those bow-fronts are just fantastic!
The windows marching into the distance on the GPO is very attractive too.

As for the restored building - ah :)

The cornice is clearly just another bizarre feature peculiar to that mad city of yours :D
Have to say though that the chequered brickwork is quite attractive in its gritty urban state in that pic.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby Devin » Tue Jun 28, 2005 3:27 am

Cork is great for bow-fronts & curving buildings.
They are practically non-existent in Dublin - unless you count that one that curves from Lincoln Place into Merrion St., beside the Ullyses chemist.
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Re: architecture of cork city

Postby altuistic » Tue Jun 28, 2005 10:15 am

Radioactiveman wrote:Here's a picture of this building prior to recent renovation. I believe from late 2003.
<img src="http://www.buildingsofireland.ie/niah/images/survey_specific/fullsize/20500550_2.jpg">
I think lex may have exagerated the condition it was in previously:


the building was painted until early 98 when it was stripped to brickwork again prbably the reason for many of its odd colorations. Musterd and a series of dastardly other colors did adorn this structure over the years. I have been looking at it every day for the last 23 years since i moved home from the states.
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