Dublin Street Lighting

Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Tue May 10, 2005 2:35 am

Well here's the thread for street lighting as orginated in the O' Connell St thread.
I think it's perhaps appropriate that both old, new and everything in between be included, hence the generic title - not least to show how public lighting in the city has progressed up to the present day.

Well to begin with, what follows is a rough history entitled 'The Lampposts of O'Connell Street - From Lamplighter to LED' :D
Much of the information is derived from an eye-straining sorting through of hundreds photographs from books, pamphlets and the internet, as well as archive footage.

As you'd expect, there's a bit of cross-over with other city streets as some lighting schemes covered more than just O'Connell St.
Anyway I hope this is of some interest to people other than myself :o; there seems to be some general interest in the topic anyway....!

Rather than trying to cover the disjointed schemes of the 18th & early 19th centuries, and accounting for the lack of images from the period, this starts in the 1870s, some 45 years after gas was introduced to Dublin in 1825.


1870s
To start, these small gas-powered column lanterns were used to light O’Connell St, Westmoreland St, College Green and Grafton St, with many other places using a similar design post and possibly identical lamps.
Placed along the edge of footpaths on O’Connell St, they featured an unusually decorative base, the lower part fluted, fairly short shaft, large glass lamp and possibly a lead-clad roof:

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During this time and right through into the 20th century, similar lampposts surrounding various statues played an important role in lighting the centre of the street.

1880
O’Connell Bridge opens, adorned with no less than 39 gas-fuelled lamps, attached to some of the grandest standards ever erected in the city – 3 five-armed columns on the median, and 4 three-armed columns on each parapet of the bridge. These must have created quite a stir when first lit:

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(Devin's pic)

1892
In a major step forward, some 78 electrically powered lampposts were installed along O’Connell St, O’Connell Bridge, Westmoreland St, D’Olier St, College St, College Green, Grafton St, Dame St, Parliament St, Mary St and Henry St.
These were the first electric lamps ever to light Dublin’s main streets and were powered from a new station at Fleet St. This project also seems to have been the first unified lighting scheme for the city centre.

Quite American in design, these were the tallest lampposts ever erected on O’Connell St to date. They featured long elegant columns rising out of a typical fluted base and were capped with a hurricane-like lamp – the glass globe suspended from a hooped frame and powered by the cable entering its underside from the top of the shaft.
Some, if not all also featured a mesh-like wire over the globes.

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They were positioned along the edge of the side pavements of O’Connell St, but also the odd one in the now-median area. One was also placed directly in front of O’Connell Monument and surrounded by four bollards as the street’s ‘introductory’ post:

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One post was also placed on each of the four corners of O’Connell Bridge, and on William Smith O’Brien’s island as can be seen here:

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You can also see one to the rear of O’Connell, with that monument’s impressive 1882 columns also evident:

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It seems these electric lamps rode roughshod over gas-lit areas, including the bridge. Some of the older small posts mentioned earlier seem to have remained for quite a number of years after these new electric ones both came and went. Gas took a long time to leave it seems.


Cntd...
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Tue May 10, 2005 2:37 am

1903-10
Sometime during this period these relatively young electric lampposts were removed, probably due their antiquated technology. It's possible it happened in 1903 as this is the year the Fleet St station shut down in favour of the Pigeon House.
Arguably O’Connell Street’s finest period in lighting then commenced with the erection of around 30 decorative posts in a symmetrical fashion the whole way down the street.

Perhaps the most commonly known of O'Connell Street's lampposts due to their similarity to the more common Victorian wrought/cast-iron headed versions around Dublin, these new posts were a little smaller in height and featured swan-neck heads. The film Michael Collins probably makes these recognisable to most people as they featured extensively, especially their large and cumbersome fittings, upon the ends of which the glass globes were attached. They also featured shamrock detail on top and intricate scroll detail all executed in iron.

Image

These were positioned exclusively along the edge of the side pavements, and on the four corners of O’Connell Bridge – and as far as can be made out the same models were used on Westmoreland St, College Green etc.
Most interestingly, if you want to know what they looked like in real life, it seems some of them were moved and still survive in use on Harcourt St as pictured below. They seem to be identical. Considering there’s only the odd one on Harcourt amongst other posts, it’s very possible these originally came from O’Connell St.

Image


1900-1916
Sometime during this period O’Connell Bridge’s lanterns were reduced in number due to safety concerns, with the parapet columns being cut down to single-lamp posts and the median standards down to three arms from their previous five. Sadly, much of the bridge’s grandeur was lost as a result, something it didn’t regain for nearly a century.

1920-23
During this period, new rather bizarre looking electric lamps were attached to the swan-neck posts, replacing the earlier globes. Some of these can be seen swinging loosely in the wind in some footage. They survived right up till the end of these grand post’s lives. These lampposts also seem to have experienced a variety of colours including black/dark grey, silver and possibly even white for the Eucharistic Congress! Here’s an example of the strange heads in the form of an identical Dawson St version from the period:

Image

Cntd...
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Tue May 10, 2005 2:38 am

1936-39
Huge change is ushered in with this period with a vast amount of lamppost up-rooting on O’Connell St and the city centre overall. It saw the installation of the city’s trademark brown, arched, double-headed aggregate concrete lampposts along many major streets including O’Connell St, O’Connell Bridge, Westmoreland St, D’Olier St, College St, College Green and possibly Dame St and Parnell Square – at least 70 posts.

A total of approximately 32 posts went up on O’Connell St, exclusively along the side pavements resulting in a magnificent marching procession of posts far into the distance along the thoroughfare. As with by now established tradition, four models were also installed on O’Connell Bridge (though in a slightly different position than previously), as well as four mini-lamps on the corners of the plinth of Nelson’s Pillar:

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Art Deco in design, these posts featured a large tapered concrete base which was stepped at the top, a tall hexagonal concrete shaft, and were topped with two half-arches with attractive ridged detailing, from each were suspended a charming copper-roofed lamp comprised of a delicate metal frame fitted with frosted glass:

Image

They proved especially effective in lighting the streets, casting light both downwards and outwards.
Considering they went up just before the War, I wonder why concrete was used as presumably metal shortages hadn’t kicked in yet?...
Concrete posts of a different style also went up on the quays and all over the city subsequently.


1961-66
During this period rather crude utilitarian posts of the kind seen in older shopping centre car parks went up along the disjointed median space of O’Connell St, presumably to light what had itself largely become a car park by this stage.
These survived until around 1980, if not until 1988:

Image
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Tue May 10, 2005 2:42 am

1975-78
This period ushered in a dark period, quite literally, for the city centre’s street lighting.
All of the grand concrete posts on O’Connell Street were removed, along with those on Westmoreland St, College Green and possibly Dame St. The only ones to survive were those of O’Connell Bridge, D’Olier St and College St – about 17 in all.
They were replaced with double and single floodlights mounted on the city’s buildings directed down onto the streets. Unfortunately for O’Connell St they merely contributed to the flashy tacky nature of the place, and eroded the linear nature of the street, so expertly generated by the previous posts:

Image

In around 1980 the two northern concrete posts on O’Connell Bridge also disappeared, to be eventually replaced with nothing but tall motorway-like posts with about 3 lamps attached way above at the top.

1987-88
As part of the city’s ‘Millennium’ celebrations, O’Connell St finally got a bit of care and attention - albeit superficial - with the unification of the median space and the erection of heritage-style three-arm lampposts: their bases and shafts replicating the city’s Victorian stock:

Image

Of their time, but effective and attractive – they provided pools of light amongst the foliage of the great plane trees, made the median feel more secure at night and looked well in their own right during the day. Only a handful now remain on the upper end of the street, and are about to be removed.

1998-2003
This period saw positive and perhaps negative things happen on O’Connell Bridge.
In an inspired move by Dublin City Council all of the lamps on the bridge were restored to their original glory, if not better with the parapets back to three arms and the medians back to their five armed splendour – the first restored precisely 80 years after they were altered.

Image
(1st pic Archiseek)

The copper heads of the lanterns could be a new feature as in black and white pictures they always seem to be have been black. The material’s presence on Grattan Bridge too now would suggest it to be a contemporary modification.

However the last of the concrete posts on the bridge were removed from the southern end in around 1999 - an appropriate move given the works on the bridge lanterns and their fitting out with bright white bulbs, but marking the end of an era. The subsequent piece-meal removal of some of the remaining posts on D'Olier St and College St should not have/be happened/ing.

2004+
We’re now seeing the execution of the first unified lighting scheme involving posts on O’Connell Street in nearly 70 years – including the median, side pavements and plaza.
Whatever one may think of the new scheme, it is welcome to see lampposts once again regaining a central role (perhaps too literally :)) in the public domain of the country’s main street.


Just a note on the dates stated - where hyphenated this refers to the approximate period in which the posts were erected/removed rather than the length of time the process took. In most, if not all cases, schemes would have been executed inside a few days or weeks.
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby Morlan » Tue May 10, 2005 4:18 am

Fantastic post Graham - a lot of effort was put in there. Thanks.

You inspired me to go rooting for some of my Dublin pictures. I hope you don't mind if post them up.

Bank Of Ireland Horse lamp.. any info on these fellas?
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O'Connell Bridge
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Temple Bar - any info on this nice lamp?
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O'Connell Bridge.
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St. Stephens Green
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South King St. - shamrock lamps.
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South Ann St. - Odd orb lamps
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Upper Mount St. (Some have you will have seen this pic before.)
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby Devin » Tue May 10, 2005 11:01 pm

RE: THE SILVER REPRODUCTION LAMPS

Phil wrote:To replace [the Art Deco] lamps with reproduction 'heritage' lamps displays a very warped sense of history

Graham Hickey wrote:On one level it is warped indeed, but I think it is important to note that these silver lampposts are much more than just heritage pieces of furniture: they are as much a part of Dublin as red telephone boxes are to London. And I presume that in some areas of that city brand new boxes have also been installed over the years in places where needed not because they're olde worlde, but because they embody the city in a manner like nothing else.

Likewise in Dublin, in fairness to the City Council, the erection of these lampposts in appropriate places is generally executed in this spirit rather than in that of a yearning for the days of yore as is generally the case with pastiche concoctions.

I hope it is ok to cross-quote into this thread (for fear of quoting out-of-context, the original posts are here: http://www.archiseek.com/content/showthread.php?p=33946#post33946 ). Since they make up such a heavy proportion of the city centre’s lamp stock, I think it’s probably best to talk about the silver repros in a dedicated Lamp Standards thread.

There are two basic types of repro lamp in use in the city. The first, and most heavily used, is quite a flimsy and, in my opinion, poorly-detailed historic-style lamp. It is found on: Winetavern Street, the Quays (excluding 6 beautiful original shamrocks outside the Four Courts), Stoney Batter, North King Street (part of), Parnell Street (part of), Summerhill, Capel Street (north end), Abbey Street Lower, Mayor Street (most of) & Commons Street in the Docklands, Fleet Street (painted blue), Ship Street (part of, painted black) Sth. Gt. George’s Street, Aungier Street, Wexford Street, Camden Street, Heytesbury Street, New Street, Dean Street, Clanbrassil Street, Harcourt Street, Ely Place and Herbert Street (the last three streets have some originals as well).

I can’t agree about the validity of these, Graham. I think there is something sick about smothering so many important city centre streets with what is a fairly cheap and nasty piece of false history.

Then there is the other, more substantial and less-used type, which is a fairly accurate replica of probably the most common genuine historic Dublin lamp standard (apparently dating to 1900-30 and found extensively throughout the North and South Georgian cores). It has a stout, deeply moulded base & ornate head. They are quite an impressive replica and are sometimes hard to tell from the originals, but the giveaway is the column]http://img226.echo.cx/img226/7108/reproductraditlamps1a4dr.jpg[/IMG]

Silver repros on the Quays
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Wed May 11, 2005 12:44 am

That is one comprehensive listing of locations :)

Agreed about the flimsy thin modern repros, they look tacky and are so obviously cheap imitations. If anything, rather than their high level of detailing by contemporary standards contributing to the streetscape in favour of supposedly inadequate modern design, they actually do the opposite, demonstrating even more-so how badly we treat lamp post design today and how incompetent we an be.

Look at these on the quays as mentioned: their proportions are so off the scale that they actually make Zoe’s scheme behind look like high art :)

Image

Agreed about not using the quality posts willy nilly, but I think that it is a worthy idea to broadly unify the city centre’s lighting where appropriate with quality - not going to say replica cause they’re more than that – silver columns.
Patrick Street as you mention Devin is the very street I was thinking of before and I think they look magnificent – including at night. Their quality design, fine proportions, regularly spaced placing and high level of light emitted make these one of the finest use of such posts, and make for a fitting contribution to the environment of Christchurch, St Patrick’s and the Iveagh Buildings.

Which is why I’d also support their insertion on St. Stephen’s Green, a place where their impact would be magnificent and would tie in with all surrounding streets’ similar original posts, not to mention their suitability to the largely historic environment of course
Saying that, the use of them (the poor imitation ones) on Camden St, Aungier St etc is one step too far – the CC are using the excuse of unifying the city too much here – it just smacks of not being bothered to come up with some decent contemporary design, likewise with the many other secondary places that Devin mentions.

Speaking of replicas – this page is rather ironic :D

http://www.irisheyes.org/dlamp.html

There are also two types of the original, one with the classic plinth-like base, the other a probably later slightly tapered base with stud detailing around the top, as used outside the Custom House, think they’re the one’s used outside the Four Courts as mentioned (always been impressed with how the CC managed to position the posts dead centred on the Custom House & Four Courts without disrupting the overall quay placing :)), and in use all over the south city but painted green such as on Palmerston Road. They’re also used on Merrion St, but the heads don’t appear to be original and are too small for the proportions of the posts.

Here’s a magnificent image of the Baggot St repros as taken by a Marko Krivograd:

Image
http://www.harphampix.com/v2/document.php?id=8654
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby Devin » Wed May 11, 2005 2:54 am

Graham Hickey wrote:That is one comprehensive listing of locations :)
It’s easy by bike :) .

Agreed about the proportion of the lamps & the Quays. There are some even greater absurdities in terms of proportion and relating to the street]really[/I] want to see any more of the (better quality) silver lamps, Graham. A lot survive in the 2 Georgian areas - I think it should be left at that. I take your point about the historic environment of St. Stephen’s Green. But to be honest, I would rather see the existing ‘60s/’70s curving lamps left - they have an attractive simplicity about them….I just can’t take any more fussy historic reproduction in the city!!

As far as I have been able to glean, the planning / architects section of the Council are not consulted in relation to removal / insertion of lamps on the city’s streets (unless of course it is a specific, coordinated scheme like O’Cll Street). This appals me!! It seems the Public Lighting section just go and do what they want….you have to ask would the city be so riddled with nasty repros otherwise?

Of the two original types, I think of the stout, plinth-like based one as the ‘male’, and the tapered-base one with stud detailing & shamrock in the centre of the head as more ‘feminine’. Yeah, they’re situated alongside the Four Courts – respite from the flimsies on the rest of the Quays! (I think it’s the stout, plinth-based ones (in repro form) that are outside the Custom House).


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
This is an example of what results when you have the brainless blanket installation of repros on city centre streets, without thinking about scale and spacing: two tall lamps inappropriately shoved up close to each other on adjoining streets & so at different angles (in an important location). I know there was a lot of street furniture around in past times, but you'd never see something like this:

Image


~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I think these lamps at Guinness's (from the An Taisce report ‘Dublinspirations’) are an excellent example of the options available other than repro:

Image
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Thu May 12, 2005 1:08 am

Devin wrote:
I would rather see the existing [Green] ‘60s/’70s curving lamps left - they have an attractive simplicity about them….I just can’t take any more fussy historic reproduction in the city!!


That's the problem I think with all this cheap repro stuff, it makes you sick of the concept full stop! I see what you mean about the curving posts on the Green, they have a certain retro feel to them too :), but in their current context of adorning multiple lanes of traffic I think they look just as they are, basic 70s functional stock shoved in for the practical reason of lighting a virtual motorway surrounding the Green - i.e. awful.
The trademark columns installed here would link in with the two other squares next door, and all surrounding Georgian streets - they'd also unify the sqaure which is increasing falling apart into an incoherent mess :(

That's extraordinary that the planning section of the CC aren't involved in post selection or preservation - no wonder such inappropriate schemes like the Summerhill farce are as they are.

I think of the stout, plinth-like based one as the ‘male’, and the tapered-base one with stud detailing & shamrock in the centre of the head as more ‘feminine’.


I've often thought of these like that too! - even if I've always preferred the former :o, they're more rooted in classical design and are more solid looking...
You're right about the ones outside the Custom House - and there used to be similar Stephen's Green-like posts here too in the 70s - along with the containers and all the rest of it.

The more I think about the c1937 lampposts, the more utterly ridiculous it is that they have/are being removed. Think of surrounding streets - Westmoreland St, Dame St, College Green - none have any posts at all, yet the very place where there was some, and original pieces of period street furniture at that, they were removed and replaced with expensive new posts! It's just ridiculous!

I saw with interest Devin in your City Hall post that the archies are still visible marching down the street - the axe just about to fall on them in the coming months after the pic being taken...

That last picture posted there is interesting - I have a picture of a startling similar warehouse location from the 70s with unusual posts - must post it soon.
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby Devin » Thu May 12, 2005 3:16 am

How the CC resisted putting in the standard skinny heritage repros in there in that historic and heavily-touristed location, I don’t know. But apparently those lamps at Guinness’s were planned & designed by the CC Lighting section ... and how well they complement the surrounding circa 1900 industrial architecture!.…so lads, more of this approach please & less of the blanket ‘heritage’ approach!

That's extraordinary that the planning section of the CC aren't involved in post selection or preservation
The remarkable thing is that seemingly all other items of the city’s historic street furniture – stone & cast iron bollards, stone paving & setts, coal hole covers etc. – are listed for protection in the development plan….but not lamp standards :eek: (An T have asked the CC to come up with a policy for lamp standards that would protect remaining originals, encourage good contemp design & restrict use of historic reproduction).

That Irish Eyes site you linked Graham is hilarious :D ........pure paddywhackery! .........but at least they managed to snap an original circa 1900 lamp standard lurking on Beresford Place and not a modern replica around the corner on Custom House Quay!
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby Morlan » Thu May 12, 2005 10:46 am

Just to add to the pictorial thesis.. here's a fine picture of our 'brown, arched, double-headed aggregate concrete lampposts' on O'Connell St. (1950s)

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Another picture I took the other day on College Green:
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Fri May 13, 2005 2:22 am

Look at it there - sure isn't it just lovely :) (although in need of restoration at the top there)

Was looking at them today, they really are charming pieces of street furniture - unlike other posts these actually weather; they mellow with age. And the way the lamps hang so delicately from the arches is striking - they're not just clamped on, rather they're suspended just perfectly, as if held by a forefinger and thumb :)

In your O'Connell St pic there Morlan it is interesting to note how fast the street changed, and how radically, with the addition of the lower median trees from the 60s on - what a change from the scene there.

Regarding the skinny repros, it was mentioned before but the way that they have been installed on one entire side of Harcourt St as a result of the Luas works, allbethey with original/full size heads is a disgrace - notably the only major element of the Luas works on this street that was carried out by the CC :rolleyes:
As far as I remember this whole stretch had original chunky posts - the current ones are a joke. Harcourt St more than most depends on its historic charm - these quality pieces of street furniture were a central part of that.

Here's a pic of a 'female' base on Merrion St, as well as the 'males' piling up on Merrion Square South:

Image

And the O'Connell Bridge standards which are specifically protected as far as I remember seeing. They have some exceptionally fine detailing, notably their twisted columns:

Image

Also their fine classical swags and snarling tritons - a triton being one of the Greek gods of the sea. Usually they have the head of a man and a fish body, but obviously it was decided to go the whole way here :)

Image
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby J. Seerski » Sun May 15, 2005 10:36 am

Some lamps in Clontarf and Rathmines are unique - they were commissioned for their respective townships when there were autonomous from Dublin Corporation.

New lamps on O'Connell Street - vile.
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Sun May 15, 2005 8:25 pm

:)

Yes the township posts are generally very fine - even the charming little green pillar-posts on hundreds of residential streets.
The larger main road posts often have the township and date stamped into them - ussally they were new electric c1900 ones.

What is very special and still surviving in a form is the very early electric lighting used to light what was the ultra-modern, not to mention ultra fashionable Cowper Road/Gardens if not the surrounding area also. The lighting here is made up of pairs of green posts facing each other across the road with a wire suspended between the two, from which hangs a (now modern) lamp in the middle of the road!
You see it a lot in the UK but very few examples over here. A wonderful feature and it's great to see it has been preserved by SD CC or whoever covers this area - rather than taking the wires down and putting heads on the posts.
Now if this had been in a deprived area - hmmmm...
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby PVC King » Mon May 16, 2005 10:37 pm

Leeson Park once had the same lighting as Cowper Road, it looked great as the light was distributed from the centre of the road which cut down black spots dramatically.

Any chance of a poll on favourite Irish light flitting once the poll on Dublin Bridges is finished?
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Wed May 18, 2005 12:58 am

Or favourite Irish kerbstone :D

It'd be difficult to draw up a shortlist of posts though, as smaller ones can't really compete with the larger.
Also the more well known ones will always have a headstart - bit like the bridge poll, it might as well be titled 'What is Dublin's most famous bridge?' :) (though O'Donovan Rossa has proved surprisingly popular)

That's interesting about Leeson Park - trying think of what's there now but it escapes me...
Still lots of lovely little green column posts in the area though, often gas orginally but with c1900 electric decorative heads on them with delicate foliage detail & shamrocks etc.

Yes the centred lights are very effective at lighting the streets. Despite the new ones being contemporary, they're still traditionally styled - essentially they're the lamp of the standard Dublin silver column painted black.
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby StephenC » Fri May 20, 2005 2:10 pm

The rubbish that lines the quays has alweays been a pet hate of mine. I got a glimpse of these additions in front of the Civic Offices. It seems the Quays are being treated to a repro refit. Any thoughts?
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Fri May 20, 2005 9:46 pm

Hmmm - what are they replacing, these suburban yokes?

Image
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby StephenC » Sat May 21, 2005 6:59 pm

Seems so. Sorry my picture is not any clearer...camera phone.
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Mon May 23, 2005 3:58 pm

Generally these small posts can look very well traditionally styled as long as the major posts of the roadway provide clear guidance as to what century it is :)
I'd be happy to see every last replica on the quays ditched in favour of contemporary posts, but with a more traditionally styled smaller post along the historic quay walls. And not necessarily a twee 'olden days' lamp, but something along the lines of the recent lamps that went up along Strand Road on the way out to Blackrock - they're distinctly modern yet have a classical early-electric look to them which works very well.

Just on those c1903 posts on O'Connell St again - took a few stills from the film Michael Collins and must admit to being a little more than pleased at finding this :) :

Image

The posts on Harcourt St are the exact same posts that were on O'Cll St in the early 20th century - indeed the film reproduced them absolutely perfectly, down to the last detail! Also interesting to note that the globes were of a lovely frosted glass rather than completely opaque as usually comes across in contemporary photos.

The film also tells us that there's at least someone in the City Council interested in these matters as presumably the art directors and researchers consulted with the CC on the street furniture of O'Cll St of the time. So clearly someone knew where to direct them towards original examples...

Which is why it is so very strange in light of this attention to detail (and lots more) that Jordan decided to merge the two streets opposite the GPO together into an imaginary street - Talville Row as it were :D
You don't want to see the stills of that, they're too embarrassing....
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby phil » Mon May 23, 2005 4:08 pm

Graham Hickey wrote:
Which is why it is so very strange in light of this attention to detail (and lots more) that Jordan decided to merge the two streets opposite the GPO together into an imaginary street - Talville Row as it were :D
You don't want to see the stills of that, they're too embarrassing....


As I read your post that was all I could think of... poetic license taken to extremes! :)
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Mon May 23, 2005 4:24 pm

:D

Oh go on then:

The Mansion House, Leinster House railings, Sheahan Memorial and Hammam Hotel all on the same street!!!
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby Plug » Mon May 23, 2005 4:36 pm

My minds still boggled that they can't even be arsed to put the same colour temperature bulbs in the mutti headed fittings on the bridge, it's a disgrace :mad:
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby Devin » Mon May 23, 2005 5:03 pm

They lost a lot of credential in Michael Collins by messing around with the places so much, esp. putting the GPO at the end of a street :rolleyes: . That would even strike people as wrong who don't really look at the city.

I imagine the 1903 post used in the film is a real one & not a replica.
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Re: Dublin Street Lighting

Postby GrahamH » Mon May 23, 2005 5:21 pm

Never thought of that - though there's quite a few of them...

Yes the way they messed around with locations and buildings like playthings in a toy town certainly lost it a lot of credibility - especially this street opposite the GPO, with the geography of the city being so central to the Rising.

Agreed Plug about the lighting of the bridges - whatever about the replacement colour temperatures, most of the fittings aren't even lucky enough to get replacement bulbs at all!
And as for the fittings themselves.....there's some pics on the bridge poll thread.
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