Henrietta Street

Henrietta Street

Postby J Lobb » Sat Mar 20, 1999 6:10 pm

Henrietta Street was the first major Georgian street to be built in Dublin. I have heard the following:

In an effort to enhance the obviously lacking historical credentials of the street, Dublin Corporation decided to cobble it, although historically it apparently was never cobbled.

The street, is actually built over the cellars of the Georgian houses on either side. Cobbles, with a concrete base, were laid by the corporation. Soon after, the cellars started to collapse under this new load. As a result, for the last five or so years, the street has had concrete-filled barrels left on it, apparently to prevent cars parking on the vulnerable areas.

Has anybody else heard this or is it just an urban myth? If true it would be interesting to know what the situation is now. The street is certainly a bit of an eye-sore as it is.
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Postby Jas » Mon Mar 22, 1999 9:07 am

I don't think its a myth.... all i know is the corporation had just did some work and the street started collapsing.....
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Postby ivg » Tue Mar 23, 1999 3:20 pm

Is anything being done about Henrietta Street? Does anyone know if the corpo has a specific policy/ pln for it? Why why why did Temple Bar happen without anything happening to Henrietta Street?
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Postby ivg » Tue Mar 23, 1999 3:21 pm

Is anything being done about Henrietta Street? Does anyone know if the corpo has a specific policy/ plan for it? Why why why did Temple Bar happen without anything happening to Henrietta Street?
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Postby Shane » Thu May 13, 1999 4:55 pm

For some very interesting developements being
undertaked by the DIT in that part of the city see the IT article-
'If this happens, Dr Tallon foresees Henrietta Street - the oldest and arguably the most important Georgian street in Dublin - becoming "a most important area for learned institutes"; indeed, he can even see the RIAI moving there from its southside base in Merrion Square as one of the potential spin-offs from developing Grangegorman.

http://www.ireland.com/newspaper/proper ... prop12.htm
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Postby Donncha » Mon Jun 14, 1999 11:09 pm

a lot of the work has so far been done by individuals living on hte street. as part of a greater project it will probably take the completion of HARP before the street is focused on again. overall very little assistance has been given by the state, probably as it would highlight the extremly run down area on this historic street's doorstep.
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Postby bohemian84 » Tue Jun 15, 1999 10:26 pm

I had an idea. Since Dublin lacks an Aras an Taoisigh why not turn Henrietta Street into a Dublin version of Downing Street. The area around it could really use a boost. Besides, how many countries don't have a home for their own prime minister. Maybe Farmleigh in the park would be better. But Henrietta street looks more democratic (i.e. non-aristocratic).
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Postby trace » Tue Oct 12, 1999 4:41 pm

From The Irish Times, 26th May 1994 (page 4):

"RESIDENTS OF GEORGIAN STREET PROTEST AT CONTINUING WORK
By Frank McDonald, Environmental Correspondent

"Residents of Dublin's oldest Georgian street are strongly protesting against the Corporation's decision to proceed with work to fill in their cellars despite assurances from the Department of Arts and Culture that the issue is being referred to the National Heritage Council.
"Mr Michael Casey, who has owned one of the houses at Henrietta Street for more than 15 years with his wife and family, said the Department had 'led us to believe that work would stop pending a report from the council, but at 8 o'clock this morning the Corporation started again without any notice to us.'
"He said the Green Party city councillor, Mr Ciaran Cuffe, had also been given assurances that no further work would be carried out.
"Mr Casey complained that in blocking up the under-street cellars, the Corporation was making it very difficult, if not impossible, for the National Heritage Council to gain access to inspect them.
"He accused the Corporation of seeking to pre-empt the council's consideration of the matter, on foot of a ruling from An Bord Pleanala - in a case taken by the Corporation itself - that the cellars did not form part of the structures in the street which were listed for preservation.
"Mr Ian Lumley, who owns one of the other houses on the street, said last night that the reference to An Bord Pleanala had been made by the Corporation without the property-owners on the street being notified in any way, and all of the repaving work was initiated without any survey of the cellars.
"However, the Corporation maintains that the repaving of the street cannot be completed until the 'foundations' which support the paving - and the cars which are regularly parked there - are made safe. For its paving department, the primary issue is one of public safety rather than archaeology.
"'We see ourselves as the saviours of the street', said Mr Noel Carroll, the Corporation's spokesman, referring to the long-standing scheme to repave it with traditional granite flags and limestone setts. 'We are trying, at great expense, to improve the street with the works we are carrying out.'
"He said the Corporation was prepared to talk to local residents about its plans. 'But in the meantime, we're going to rectify a situation that is dangerous. We don't want to leave ourselves open to accusations of negligence, so nobody is going to stop us lifting a shovel to remove this danger.'
"The repaving work was started over two years ago, but it was disrupted when the cellars of two of [the] houses apparently caved in. The Corporation is now seeking to fill in all of the cellars, but this is being resisted by the newly formed Henrietta Street Preservation Society."
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Postby Jas » Tue Oct 12, 1999 4:45 pm

so henrietta street has been left to rot since 1992.......
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Henrietta Street

Postby Tom F » Sun Jun 11, 2000 7:44 pm

Image

Dublin Corporation
PRESS RELEASE - 6th June, 2000


"Henrietta Street Conservation Study Presentation

The Henrietta Street Conservation Study was presented by Dublin City Manager, John Fitzgerald to the property owners on Tuesday, 6th June, 2000 at 6.00p.m. in the Bencher’s Room, Kings Inn, Dublin 7 (Constitution Hill Entrance).   The study will provide guidance for all the concerned interests in the future conservation of the street.  Speakers will include Justice Ronan Keane and Professor Kevin Nolan.

As part of the EU co-funded Historical Area Rejuvenation Project (HARP), Dublin Corporation commissioned the Dublin Civic Trust to carry out a detailed conservation assessment and brief for the future of Henrietta Street.  One of the prime objectives of HARP is to develop a co-ordinated approach for the future of the area through partnership with Dublin Corporation, private sector property owners and non-Government organisations.

Henrietta Street contains the most architecturally and historically significant group of Georgian town houses in Dublin and adjoins the impressive Kings Inns complex. The twelve surviving houses, which date from 1730, were built for some of the leading political and aristocratic families of the period, including the Gardiners. The interiors contain some of the most impressive staircases and plasterwork in Dublin, as the street was occupied by so many figures of wealth and fashion, such as Bishops and leading office holders of State. Many of the houses were altered and further embellished during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, so that the street presents a microcosm of Georgian craftsmanship and detailing of international significance. While the street became a tenement for most of the last century, this paradoxically preserved the street as a time capsule while many of the interiors evoke the stage setting of Sean O’Casey’s plays.

The first stage of the study, which was completed in late 1998, comprised a detailed archival, photographic and descriptive inventory of each individual house identifying all features of significance worthy of preservation. 

The second and final stage of the study, which is the subject of this presentation, provides for a detailed structural and architectural conservation report for each of the individual buildings.  This report together with a conservation based works programme and cost plan provides guidance for property owners on the conservation and preservation of these unique buildings to the highest specification.  The report was prepared by a multi-disciplinary team co-ordinated by the Dublin Civic Trust, which operates as a charitable conservation advisory body based at the historic 4 Castle Street, Dublin2. "

Here's hoping!
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Postby LOB » Thu Dec 14, 2000 12:32 pm

Noticed yesterday that No3 Henrietta street (which was reputed to be the subject of a future CPO by Dublin Corporation) has some samples of render on it, presumably because of the appalling state of the brickwork-hope they don't go ahead with it.
It all seems like a pathetic attempt to spend as little money as possible on the building without addressing the fundamental problems.
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Postby Paul Clerkin » Thu Dec 14, 2000 12:35 pm

The corporation has served notice of intention to acquire No3 and 14.
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Postby Martin Shiels » Fri Dec 15, 2000 1:04 pm

Where would one go to see the above study? I'm a new tenant on Henrietta St. so have an interest in it's future.
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Postby LOB » Fri Dec 15, 2000 4:43 pm

As far I as know the documents were produced for the owners on henrietta street and not really as a public document . try your landlord on henrietta street or the dublin civic trust(castle street)or dublin corporation preservation office(not sure of its official title).
If the building you are living in has recently been the subject of a planning application then the document may be on the planning file. A specific document was compiled for each building giving surveys of existing state and proposals its upkeep.

[This message has been edited by LOB (edited 15 December 2000).]
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Postby LOB » Fri Dec 15, 2000 4:45 pm

The samples of render on No. 3 mentioned yesterday have now been removed
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Postby LOB » Mon Feb 05, 2001 5:56 pm

A planning notice has been put up on Number 3 for change of use at ground and first floor and part of the basement for offices
with 5 apartments at second and third floor as well as the remaining part of the basement.
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Postby Paul Clerkin » Tue Feb 20, 2001 1:49 pm

What effect is that going to have on the interior?
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Postby LOB » Tue Feb 20, 2001 5:10 pm

I have not had the chance to check yet. might try in the next few days
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Henrietta Street

Postby doozer » Tue Apr 23, 2002 12:43 pm

Does anyone know whats going to happen to the houses on Henrietta that have yet to be taken in hand? Walking past today I noticed that the first on the left is up for sale by DC. I'm presuming that they're listed but what are the conditions of sale?I'm aware that three at the top of the street have been recently renovated but surely we can make a bit more of a concerted effort to save these, they are magnificent.
I know that they were slums for a long time but when first built they were considered the finest buildings in the city before the move across the river. The facades are a bit the worst for wear ,the brick is beginning to break down after years of mistreatment. I'd hate to see them massacered for a commercial venture- anyone know anything?
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Postby MG » Tue Apr 23, 2002 12:45 pm

If the Kings Inns thought that they needed more space in the future, they should jump at the chance.
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Postby LOB » Tue Apr 23, 2002 2:23 pm

There are actually two for sale (3 & 14)
I doubt if The Kings Inns would need that much room & whether they would be appropriate for their uses.
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Postby Paul Clerkin » Wed Sep 04, 2002 10:27 am

No 15 has the builders in at the moment. A new roof is going on, the galvanised temp onw has been removed and there was a delivery of steel girders during the last few weeks. Also sounds of building work from within.

Just from living beside them, some of the houses are in a dreadful state. Ian Lumley of An Taisce, his looks desperate from outside, must be rotting inside.

Archeire Henrietta Street
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Postby GregF » Wed Sep 04, 2002 10:34 am

I thought this street was designated a National Heritage Site.........Jesus are they waiting for the buildings to fall down before they do anything....It's gas the two faceness of the clicque....they spend millions excavating fields and bogs wanting to put up tourist centres yet they let our already built environment fall down about us......the thick C***ts..will they ever cop on. I think it is a part of that anti Dub thing........which led to the brutal destruction of Ireland's capital city in the first place.
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Postby James » Wed Sep 04, 2002 10:37 pm

Actually

Lumleys House No 12 is in prettty good state of repair he's beenworking onit for the last twenty years so no surprises there.

Caseys, no 13 is in very good nick and 4 (Hanrattys) ispristine internally, don't be deceived by dirty brickwork.

Ask for a tour.
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Postby Paul Clerkin » Thu Sep 05, 2002 9:41 am

No4 is pristine? Funny I got that impression from it, must be the well painted front door, thats normally the last thing to be done.
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