Hack The City

Hack The City

Postby StephenC » Mon Jul 30, 2012 11:41 pm

Can anyone translate the following for me...

Open Call: Hack the City-Interstitial Insertions


HACK THE CITY – Interstitial Insertions: Urban Mapping and Evolutionary Morphologies

Criss crossing our cities infrastructes are left over spaces and void spaces. What do you imagion could be developed in such spaces? What function could such spaces play within our city?

Calling all architects, desigers, artists, geographers and urban planners, we invite you to take part in the third HACK THE CITY lab. Building on Interactivos and the IdeaLab, INTERSISTIAL INSERTIONS, provides you with an opportunity to work with leading architects, geographers and urban planners, who will guide you through a process for developing ideas for such city insertions. Outcomes of the workshop will be displayed as part of the HACK THE CITY programme and the Studiolab projects.

http://sciencegallery.com/

http://studiolabproject.eu/

Interstitial Insertions is a five day workshop, which focuses on enhancing and transforming the function and resilience of the city, through the creation of ideas that address liminal, in-between and left over spaces in the city.

Working with experts and academics in the fields of urban theory, sustainable architecture, ecological design and critical urban geography, selected participants will work with this team of mentors too:

1. Reflect and refine project ideas and urban interventions
2. Develop propositions that translate into workable designs
3. Unpack the discourse and critically examine the idea of the city as a complex, super-organism and system

Workshop Coordinators: Professor Greg Keeffe (Architecture - Queens University Belfast); Dr. Nick Dunn (Architecture – Manchester Metropolitan University); Dr. Alma Clavin (Geography – NUI Galway).

Workshop Information:
The city is changing: no longer is it an aesthetic creation, or purely an industrial powerhouse. It is a living, breathing super-organism, with a myriad of multiple and competing functions. As a super-organism, the future city will be defined more by its metabolism, than purely its primary function or spatial form.

What interventions would you make that could profoundly explore the idea of the city as a living organism?

What ideas would you develop to address the gaps and in-betweens spaces that are contained within our urban strucutures?

The workshop will consist of three parts:
Day 1: Team & Project Introductions & discussions on urbanity

Since the emergance of urban studies in the 1960 our concepts of the city have radically changed. The first phase of the Interstitial Insertions Workshop, will introduce novel approaches to understanding the contemporary urban situation, coupling this with a critical framework with which to splice the new ‘DNA’ of city, as a super-organism and living body.

Teams will be lead through critical discussions and city walks, where the production of creative mappings as an instrumental way of understanding urban space and the architectural ramifications of ‘wandering’ in the city and landscape will be described and evaluated. Drawing on Guy Debord (1959) and the Situationists experiments, we are interested in critically reflecting on such approaches and their translation into geo-spatial contexts. Combining such a critical approach with ideas of evolutionary morphology, our goal is discuss the proposed projects and evaluate what we mean by sustainable urban forms.

Day 2: Development of Project Propositions (Day 2)
Drawing on propositional research methodologies, which utilise design as a method to visualise the effects of potential new interventions on a place and their influence. The second phase of the workshop will guide participants through a series of approachs which test their idea propostions. Current methods such as participatory design, practice-oriented design, service design, co-creation and human-centred design will be evaluated. Emphasises will be placed on generating scenarios, which can be used as a means for generating meaningful examples for city interventions and the relevence of up-scaling, from small-local level user innovations to larger, national and global innovations. In providing such methodological guidance, participants will be able to frame and critically evaluate their proposed projects.

Day 3-4: Emergent Interstitial Insertions (Day 3-4)
Practical hands on development of projects will continue in through Day 3 and 4, whereby projects will be encouraged through a series of site analyses, drawings, photographic studies, GPS and data models to refine their ideas and develop proposals for ‘interstital’ exhibitions.

Day 5: Preparation and Exhibition of Insertions (Day 5)
Execuation and documentation of projects in the Science Gallery and HackLab and across the city.

Participant Guidelines
The call is aimed at architects, artists, geographers, urbanists.
Teams (2-4 persons) as well as individuals are encouraged to apply.
Ideas should focus on addressing liminal, in-between and left over spaces in the city.
The workshop will open to between 18-24 participants.
Workshop coordinators and technical support will be available from 10-8PM for the duration of the five day workshop.
Assistance (visual design, mapping etc) will be provide for projects.
Admissions to the workshop is free.

Applications
Applications to this workshop should be submitted too: teresa.dillon@sciencegallery.com by 17.00 on Aug 10th, 2012.

For more information please click HERE.

Call Opens: 24th July 2012
Call Closes: 10th August 2012
Workshop: 14th-19th August 2012
Exhibition: 18th - 19th August 2012

HACK THE CITY is kindly supported by the Department of Arts, Hertiage and the Gaeltacht, Dublin City of Science, 2012, IBM and Dublin City Council.
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StephenC
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Re: Hack The City

Postby gunter » Tue Jul 31, 2012 12:10 am

You have to begin by unpacking the discourse, how can you hope to get to grips with the city's interstitial voids if your discourse is still packed.

Come on, this is liminal, not subliminal . . . get with the program.

If the city is a living breathing super-organism, then we can kill it.
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Re: Hack The City

Postby soulsearcher » Thu Aug 02, 2012 3:22 pm

gunter wrote:You have to begin by unpacking the discourse, how can you hope to get to grips with the city's interstitial voids if your discourse is still packed.

Come on, this is liminal, not subliminal . . . get with the program.

If the city is a living breathing super-organism, then we can kill it.


Wise old Gunter, I think you should look beyond the interstitial jargon and give credit where credit is due. If I were a recent graduate, or an experienced out of work built environment professional, I would jump at this opportunity - a free 5 day workshop with a detailed programme, all materials provided, support from a multi-disciplinary academic team, and best of all, a chance to engage with and learn from people with different backgrounds. Where would you get it?

I would agree that the trendy academic jargon is totally off-putting (maybe they thought it was necessary to attract a younger crowd). However, cross-disciplinary relationships between planners and architects will bear fruit at events like these - Relationships that are all too rare in Dublin, given the way the education system and public administration is currently set up.

My 2 cent.
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Re: Hack The City

Postby gunter » Fri Aug 03, 2012 1:46 am

That’s a very positive slant on the matter, fair play to you soulsearcher

. . . and here I was thinking I’d be giving them the five days for free.

A cynical person might characterize this Hack the City initiative as a case of an outfit who can’t come up with their own ideas, putting out a rescue call for other peoples’ ideas in order to forestall their funding being cut in the next shake up.

Luckily, nobody around here is cynical, but, being old and cranky, as you’ve correctly deduced, I’m not reading this jargon strewn invitation to give freely of my time, with its accompanying, multiple, spelling mistakes [see, old - and - cranky] just as a piece of innocent over-enthusiasm, I’m inclined to read this, appallingly un-proof read, jargon-fest as symptomatic of an ailment which afflicts almost all architecture and urban discourse at the present time.

We’re directionless, despondent and underemployed, but we’re desperate to appear relevant, knowledgeable and useful. We think that we can veil our shallow mysteries in a threadbare cloak of mystique. We’re trained to see and trained to appreciate what we see, but we forget that everyone else sees too and, without the conditioning, they don’t get it. We’re mesmerized by the conflicts inherent in urbanism, the gritty ugliness juxtaposed with the gleaming beauty, but we don’t recognize that this has always been so. We think we need new ideas, we think the urban condition is now somehow radically different than it has always been. Quote: ‘The city is changing: no longer is it an aesthetic creation, or purely an industrial powerhouse. It is a living, breathing super-organism, with a myriad of multiple and competing functions. As a super-organism, the future city will be defined more by its metabolism, than purely its primary function or spatial form.’

When did the city suddenly become a living breathing super-organism?

. . . probably at Catal Huyuk, eight thousand years ago!

We need to learn again how to mend cities, not how to artify, in a pseudo artistic frenzy of graphic vacuousness, the slashes and gaps that not mending the city has left across the face of the city.

Gratuitous displays of nauseating jargon is only a symptom of the problem, not have the wisdom, or the will, to learn how to mend our cities is the problem.
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Re: Hack The City

Postby StephenC » Fri Aug 03, 2012 1:47 pm

Your disillusion with the current stasis in architecture in Dublin (and Ireland) and the general sense of inertia and status quo in the city shines through in this post Gunter. I cant help but share it and given the fall off in commentary in this site in recent times, so do so many others who seem to have given up.

Having participated in so many of these types of initiatives over the past couple of years I have to wonder what the sum of their parts is...have they amounted to anything tangible and real. I have written reports, in instances commissioned by the City Council, that haven't even elicited a comment or worthwhile, for-the-record engagement from the same council. We have seen excellent initiatives come and go but little seems to change - Designing Dublin, Love the City, Hack the City, Redrawing Dublin...these all seem to blend into the haze of indifference that surrounds those in control of the city. Little changes, the same mediocre responses (or in most cases lack of response - so much cheaper) remain.

Anyhow I digress; the purpose of the original post was simply to understand what the f*** "Emergent Interstitial Insertions" are? Do I need to seek medical advice in advance?
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Re: Hack The City

Postby gunter » Fri Aug 03, 2012 3:15 pm

StephenC wrote:Anyhow I digress; the purpose of the original post was simply to understand what the f*** "Emergent Interstitial Insertions" are?


New stuff to put in cavities, would seem to be a literal translation

StephenC wrote:Do I need to seek medical advice in advance?


You're taking this to a darker place than I had contemplated
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