reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churches

Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Jan 16, 2012 2:17 pm

Famous fresco by Clarke goes on display in Donegal


A famous fresco painted by the country's greatest acknowledged stained glass artist, Harry Clarke, and which had been hidden for decades at a County Donegal Cathedral, was finally unveiled this week.

The fresco of an angel had been left hidden for decades under several layers of paint at the back of the altar at Saint Eunan's Cathedral in Letterkenny and was by unveiled after restoration works costing €700,000 were recently completed.

Restorer Ruth Rothwell said, “The discovery of the painting was a very welcome find.”

“We suspected that something might be there. Over the years, the gold leaf and bright colours went out of fashion and were painted over. It was a slow and painstaking job but it was really worth it in the end when we discovered the painting and started to restore it.

“In total, it took three months to restore the painting, most of which was spent removing six layers of paint. Once this was done paint analysis was carried out to discover the exact colours used in the original painting so we could reproduce those.”

According to Ms Rothwell, it is believed that the painting was, “painted on a canvass at Harry Clarke's studio in Dublin and then stuck onto the Cathedral wall using a rabbit skin glue.”

It is also believed that much of the paint used was a gold Italian colour.

Commenting on the find, local curate Fr Eammon Kelly said, “It looked lovely and we didn't know whether it had been destroyed or not. We are delighted that it has been uncovered and it really adds to what has been an absolutely beautiful restoration.”
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Jan 26, 2012 9:53 am

A.W.N. Pugin

A programme on the BBC Four

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00n58pm
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Jan 31, 2012 1:30 pm

Directory of Stained Glass in Wales


http://stainedglass.llgc.org.uk/
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Feb 15, 2012 4:56 pm

Richard Hurley

The following was recently published in New Liturgy:

The following spoken by Fr Jones at the introduction to the Funeral Mass recalls Richard’s life-long contribution to church art and architecture.

"Richard’s strong, Christian faith found a marvellous expression in his chosen profession. Church architecture and Richard have been a wonderful story since the 1950s. As a young architect he was a member of the Church Exhibitions Committee of the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland. That would lead to membership of the newly established panel on church art and architecture of the Bishops’ Commission for Liturgy, formed during the Second Vatican Council and then becoming in 1965 the Advisory Committee on Sacred Art and Architecture. Richard was a member of that commission for over forty years, serving as its chairperson for nine years, after the death of his great friend, Mgr Seán Swayne. Both, around the same age, were mentors to one another, but not simply Seán offering the liturgical perspective and Richard expressing that in architectural terms. Both were persons of liturgy and architecture, for worship has to be expressed in the human condition, by the human spirit and body.

Richard has also served for many years as a member of our Dublin Diocesan Art and Architecture Commission.

For over a half a century, with passion, Richard engaged in the work of design and colour. He worked to high standards, sometimes disappointed by our failure to work to a vision captured in the Second Vatican Council, not just in the 1960s and times past, but also today when so many want to revert to a past long gone.

Richard often quoted Rudolf Schwarz, allowing me to note the influence on him of German Church Architecture of the 1920s onwards: ‘For the celebration of the Lord’s Supper, a moderately large well-proportioned room is needed, in its centre a table, and on the table a bowl of bread and a cup of wine. The table may be decorated with candles and surrounded by seats for the congregation. That is all. Table, space and walls make up the simplest church.’ Richard spent a life, with great passion, designing that simplest church, from the Arts Council awarded, single cell prayer room of the Bettystown Oratory of the Medical Missionaries of Mary in 1963 to the work on which he was engaged on the day he died, St Mel’s Cathedral in Longford. In between were many projects, cathedrals in Cork and Eldoret, churches, old and new in Dublin, Galway, Belfast and elsewhere in Ireland and England, special places like the Mercy International Centre, the Honan Chapel and Glencairn Abbey, the two places where I have been privileged to worship, almost daily, for almost twenty five years: the Liturgy Room in Carlow and St Mary’s Oratory at Maynooth.

The iconic Liturgy Room, a large well-proportioned room, ‘the great room of the house,’ ‘the layout … orientated towards an informal antiphonal gathering surrounding a central area focused on the altar,’ ‘a development of the idea of the family gathering around the table.’ Still using Richard’s own words, ‘ Everything in the room … a shade of white –wall, floor, ceiling, light fittings and carpet. The only colour added … the sap green of the fig tree in the corner ... the oak furnishings and a terracotta Madonna and Child by Benedict Tutty.’ All of this, with ‘the limitations of the materials,’ providing ‘fertile soil for the growth of spiritual freedom.’

And St Mary’s Oratory in Maynooth College. Again in Richard’s favourite and preferred antiphonal layout. For those of us who worship there on weekdays, it provides the space for prayer and reflection. Richard’s re-ordering –in the ‘noble simplicity’ of the Second Vatican Council- complemented by the art of its time –he had a great respect for our heritage- and our time –the stained glass and the earlier work of Benedict Tutty and the newer work of Patrick Pye, Imogen Stuart, Ken Thompson and Kim En Joong, gives us each day our place to encounter God and celebrate the sacred mysteries.

If I mention the names of certain artists, it is to highlight the importance of their place in worship –a place that Richard never forgot. There are many other names because Richard knew the beauty that the artist could contribute. All of this ensuring that the Church is here, in the words of his great friend, Austin Flannery, ‘to serve humankind in a spirit of poverty, humility and love.’

Some said ‘stark,’ ‘minimalist’ and Richard might have said, speaking from experience, ‘it works.’ Richard gave his opinion, his preference, with a certainty. And so often he was perfectly right. Honoured by the Royal Institute of Architects of Ireland, the Royal Hibernian Academy and the Pontifical University of St Patrick’s College, Maynooth. Today by many colleagues, architects and artists.

Richard brought us on a journey. He used that word in explaining his designs. With masterly use of light, with simple design, with every shade of white, with the beauty of art, we were on a journey. We were led always and further within the space. We were led to prayer and worship. Ultimately we were led to God.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Feb 15, 2012 5:22 pm

Kilanerin, Co. Wexford

Some good news of a wonderful re-constitution of the paint scheme of Kilanerin church:

http://www.kilanerin.com/history-church ... oklet.html
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Feb 26, 2012 11:23 pm

PUGIN BICENTENARY

Finally, something to mark the bicentenary of A.W.N. Pugin's birth which will be celebrated next Thursday, 1 MArch 2012.

The Irish Architectural Archive has organised an exhibition which will be opened next Thursday:

The Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht
will open an exhibition of drawings by
Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin
from the Irish Architectural Archive
marking the bicentenary of his birth.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Sun Feb 26, 2012 11:32 pm

PUGIN BICENTENARY

Lecture Series

During March the Irish Architectural Archive will host a lecture series on Pugin

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Lecture Series


Thursday 1st March at 1.15pm
The A.W.N. Pugin Nuremberg sketchbook of 1838 in the Irish Architectural Archive
and an overview of the role of the Pugins in Ireland

Dr Roderick O’Donnell, FSA

Thursday 8th March at 1.15pm
Pugin and the Gothic Revival
Dr Christine Casey, Trinity College Dublin

Tuesday 13th March at 1.15pm
Gothic Nuremburg
Dr Lynda Mulvin, University College Dublin

Thursday 15th March at 1.15pm
A.W.N. Pugin and St Patrick’s College Maynooth
Dr Frederick O’Dwyer, Architect and Architectural Historian

Thursday 22nd March at 1.15pm
Pugin, Ritual and Design
Dr John Maiben Gilmartin, Art Historian, Academic and Lecturer

Thursday 29th March at 1.15pm
Restoring Pugin’s Heritage in Ireland – Experiences of a Conservation Architect
Michael Tierney, Conservation Architect



All lectures are free and open to the public and take place in
the Irish Architectural Archive, 45 Merrion Square, Dublin
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Mon Feb 27, 2012 8:28 pm

St Mel's Cathedral Longford


Press Release – Monday 27 February 2012 - Immediate

Attn: Newsdesks, Photodesks and Religious Affairs Correspondents



Statement by Bishop Colm O’Reilly concerning the tender process for the organ restoration of Saint Mel’s Cathedral



The following statement has been issued by Bishop Colm O’Reilly, Bishop of Ardagh and Clonmacnoise, concerning the tender process for the organ restoration of Saint Mel’s Cathedral, Longford:



“When Saint Mel’s Cathedral experienced a catastrophic fire on the night of Christmas Eve/Christmas morning 2009, I immediately made a public commitment that our beloved Cathedral would be rebuilt.



“Today I reaffirm this commitment and in doing so I wish to state that, arising from the trust which has been placed in me in my role as bishop, I have a key responsibility to lead this significant project in the most transparent and cost effective manner possible. Within these parameters, it is my intention that the rebuilding of Saint Mel’s, and all that lies within, must be completed to the highest possible standard in order that it will appropriately serve the faithful of Longford, our diocese and the country as a major place of Catholic worship.



“The restoration and future of Saint Mel’s Cathedral depends on the trust and support of the faithful. In order to safeguard this trust, responsible and sometimes difficult decisions are necessary to uphold the common good. In this regard I have received, over the last number of days, a formal representation from a Dáil deputy (see below), and separately media questions, both querying the awarding of the contract to rebuild the organ of Saint Mel’s Cathedral to the specialist Fratelli Ruffati of Padua, Italy. In this context I wish to place the following on the public record:



On the basis of the tender submitted, the committee established to oversee the organ tendering process recommended that the contract be offered to Fratelli Ruffati on the basis of musicality, design of the organ and value for money. A letter of intent has been issued. There will be a cost saving of over €30,000 by going with the Fratelli Ruffati tender.


The committee established to deal with the organ tendering process included the best expertise available in Ireland: it was chaired by Professor Gerard Gillen and included Dr John O’Keeffe (Maynooth) and Fintan Farrelly, the Saint Mel’s Cathedral organist, as members. In addition to these musical experts the acclaimed church architect, the late Dr Richard Hurley, was a member until his passing last December. I, along with Father Sean Casey (Cathedral Project Committee) and Gerard Neville (Punch Consulting Engineers), were also on this committee.


Three firms who gave expressions of interest were invited to submit plans and they also gave an oral presentation. All did so and each was heard for over an hour.


“On behalf of the Diocese of Ardagh and Clonmacnois I must be accountable for every cent received and spent in the interest of the faithful. Where possible employment contracts are awarded to Irish sub-contractors but, regardless of external pressures, I would be failing in my duty if I did not take value for money and quality of finished product into account.



“I would like to take this opportunity to thank all those people who are deeply concerned and strongly supportive of the work that we are endeavouring to do to rebuild Saint Mel’s Cathedral.”



ENDS
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Tue Feb 28, 2012 6:57 pm

St. Mel's Cathedral

Fine Gael on the Organ


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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Fearg » Tue Feb 28, 2012 7:50 pm

It's not accurate that Jones is the only organ building firm in Ireland. Additionally, jones did not build the original organ, their instrument only dated from 1982, so the historical argument is questionable also. Good news is that they are going for a pipe organ.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby derekbyrne » Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:06 pm

Kenneth Jones is in fact the only company in Ireland capable of designing and making new organs.They are actually the only company with large workshop facilities and highly skilled rescources to carry out such specialist work. They make there own new organs including the custom designed consoles, soundboards, actions, chasis, pedal boards, pipes, organ cases, etc.. Whilst other organbuilders such as Trevor Crowe who has without doubt established credibility for himself in Ireland especially with restoration and rebuilding and is an excellent voicer simply do not undertake such extensive new organbuilding work. Much of his rebuilding work is subcontracted to overseas factory supply firms for many organparts and also manpower. There is no comparison between Kenneth Jones organ firm and other Irish organbuilders many who have either worked or trained under Kenneth Jones organs firm at some point in time. The crux of the matter is we have a responsibilty to ensure the Irish skills and training can continue in ireland. It is the future of the Irish organbuilding craft that is being endangered .
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Fearg » Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:30 pm

Wells Kennedy would also be fully geared up for such a project.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Fearg » Tue Feb 28, 2012 10:42 pm

Wonder what the various firms proposals were like? I always felt the previous 2man organ whilst it had an exciting sound, was a little limited in spec for a cathedral organ..
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby derekbyrne » Wed Feb 29, 2012 10:03 am

I should clarify I was refering to the republic of ireland. As to the new speciafication this is not transparent as yet and also whether it will be a pure pipe organ as rufatti have partnership with Rodgers electroninc organs and are know for hybrids.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Feb 29, 2012 11:57 am

derekbyrne wrote:I should clarify I was refering to the republic of ireland.



Really, is not this all becoming very parochial in outlook?

We know that several "foreign" organ builders have built organs in Ireland since the 19th, century on the basis of their reputation. As a matter of interest, has Kenneth Jones built organs outside of Ireland - even the republic of Ireland?

And, is it necessary, as Counsellor Bannion seems to think, that every organ in the country should end up sounding the same?
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:04 pm

Fratelli Ruffatti.


Her we can learn somethingof the philosophy and outlook of the Ruffatti company.
http://www.ruffatti.com/history_philosophy.htm
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:07 pm

Fratelli Ruffatti


And here is a list of organs built by them:

http://www.ruffatti.com/installations.htm
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:09 pm

Fratelli Ruffatti

And here we have an idea of their sound:

http://www.ruffatti.com/listen.html
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:30 pm

Cavan church gets bell tower and spire- 140 years later

A County Cavan church has finally got a bell tower and spire, 140 years later than originally planned.

The tower and spire are part of a €1m restoration project on the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Kingscourt, which was reopened by Bishop Michael Smith of Meath. The project also included the renovation of the roof, major upgrading of electrical and mechanical systems, the restoration of stained glass windows, the provision of disabled access routes and the cleaning and repointing of the stonework.

Stained glass windows, one of them designed by famous artists Evie Hone depicting the Apparition at Fatima and two sets from Harry Clarke Studios, were also refurbished.

Parking facilities have been enhanced and closed-circuit broadcast system installed which will allow the relay of services through the parish website.

When the church was designed by William Hague, one of the leading architects of his time, the intention was that a bell tower and steeple would be included but they were never finished.

Hundreds of parishioners attended the rededication service, at which Fr Padraig McMahon, who is a native of Kingscourt, said a lot had happened since the doors of the church opened 140 years ago.

“We can only imagine the cares and concerns that have occupied the minds and hearts of those who have prayed here during world and civil wars, during depressions, recessions and times of plenty,” he remarked. One thing has remained constant, which is God’s presence; stones and slates are mere materials that stand around us.”

“It takes faith and trust to turn them into a place of prayer and into a house for God’s people," he said.

The design team for the refurbishment was headed by local architect Niall Smith and the main contractor was firm from nearby Beauparc.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby derekbyrne » Wed Feb 29, 2012 5:47 pm

Please see www.kennethjonesorgans.com.

Kenneth Jones organs can be found in every continent except Antartica and have become highly regarded and known worldwide. They are found in ireland, the united kingdom the USA, in the far east and Australia.
I am not opposed to artistic diversification, but one should give credit where it is due and should also be proud of our Irish achievemnets as do the organ lovers and experts in other european countries. It would be best to do ones homework before spouting about foreign firms.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby derekbyrne » Wed Feb 29, 2012 5:48 pm

Please see http://www.kennethjonesorgans.com.

Kenneth Jones organs can be found in every continent except Antartica and have become highly regarded and known worldwide. They are found in ireland, the united kingdom the USA, in the far east and Australia.
I am not opposed to artistic diversification, but one should give credit where it is due and should also be proud of our Irish achievemnets as do the organ lovers and experts in other european countries. It would be best to do ones homework before spouting about foreign firms.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Mar 01, 2012 9:40 am

A.W.N. Pugin

'Gothic for Ever': A.W.N. Pugin, Lord Shrewsbury and the Rebuilding of Catholic England

Michael Fisher

Image


ISBN 978-1-904965-36-7

A.W.N. Pugin (1812-1852) was the foremost propagandist of the nineteenth-century Gothic Revival, whose aim was the restoration of the ancient splendours of the Catholic Church. Turning this vision into reality required a wealthy and influential patron, and Pugin found one in John Talbot (1787-1852), sixteenth earl of Shrewsbury and England' s leading Catholic layman. Impressed by PuginÕs talent and enthusiasm, and by his devotion to the Church, Lord Shrewsbury provided Pugin with the means and the opportunities he needed, in and around his ancestral Staffordshire estate Ð Alton Towers. The Pugin/Shrewsbury partnership was arguably the most successful and creative of its kind in Victorian Britain, drawing the attention of scholars, artists and architects from all over the country and from overseas. The buildings themselves, and the close relationship between earl and architect, and their wider significance in the context of the Gothic and Catholic Revivals, are examined in detail in this book which has been published to mark the 200th anniversary of Pugin's birth.

'This remarkable and significant book is a major contribution to Pugin studies and a fitting contribution to the commemoration of the bicentenary of Pugin's birth in 2012.' - The Most Reverend Bernard Longley, M.A., S.T.L., Archbishop of Birmingham

'A remarkable insight into the dynamic relationship between A. W. N. Pugin and his patron John Talbot, the sixteenth earl of Shrewsbury, creators of Victorian Gothic.' - Paul Atterbury

'If you want to discover how great Pugin was, and how much the Church and the Gothic Revival owe to him, this is an essential study' - Anthony Symondson SJ

'This handsome book will add greatly to the pleasure of a visit to north Staffordshire' - Alexandra Wedgwood

Staffordshire-born Michael Fisher has had a lifelong interest in the work of Pugin in his home county. A history graduate of Leicester University and former Research Scholar at Keele, he is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. His publications include Pugin-land (2002), Hardman of Birmingham, Goldsmith and Glasspainter (2008), and Alton Towers: Past and Present (2009), and he has written articles for Country Life. He was an adviser to Time Team in their TV production of Pugin: God of Gothic (2006), and appeared in the programme. He is a member of the Fabric Committee of St Chad's Cathedral, Birmingham, and of the Alton Towers Heritage Committee. Ordained as an Anglican priest in 1979, he is based at the twelfth-century church of St Chad, Stafford.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Mar 01, 2012 9:45 am

derekbyrne wrote: It would be best to do ones homework before spouting about foreign firms.



Tut tut ! I think we dropped a semiquaver here: mine was an interrogative statement and not an indicative one.
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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:50 am

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Re: reorganisation and destruction of irish catholic churche

Postby Praxiteles » Thu Mar 01, 2012 10:52 am

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