City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby CologneMike » Tue Sep 21, 2010 10:53 pm

KeepAnEyeOnBob wrote:I still say if the buildings on William street were spruced up, then despite the rubbish modern buildings at the start of the street, with the streetscape remodelled it would be leagues ahead of Cruises Street. As is it is often busier and people cross back and forth despite the traffic.

Cruises Street has a feel of a back-alley. Not surprising as basically that is what it is. It seems disappointing that the money that went into knocking Cruises Hotel and building Cruises Street couldn't have gone into upgrading/refurbishing/replacing buildings along the existing streetscape - surely there was ample opportunity around that area even without Cruises Street. Now we still have the eyesores of the old Dunnes, Roches extension/Liddy St. shops, Penneys, Brown Thomas, the old Burgerland building (opposite Williamscourt - which was pretty much the land of the living dead until recently with Guineys). The new buildings on Sarsfield Street may as well have not been built - they are so grim looking! (being occupied would only make them marginally better than they are). Surely the money could have gone into replacing ugly modern buildings instead of tearing down an historic hotel and giving an excuse not to pedestrianise or upgrade existing long-standing city centre shopping streets (which have largely been left to rot until now).


To dismiss Cruises Street as nothing but a back-alley is absurd. These forty or so shops on a pedestrian street brought a healthy injection of fresh blood to the city’s centre retail trade twenty years ago. Granted the main thrust of this development was powered by English high street outlets which proved a success in maintaining footfall for the city centre, especially William Street.

The real disappointment for me is that Lower William Street has after twenty years still not grasped its good fortune by not building on the success of Cruises Street. For example there are two candidates on William Street which would be ideal for a Marks & Spencer Department Store.

The first building Sports 2000, which is also connected to Cruises Street to the rear.

Image Image

The second building with EBS, Golden Grill and Centra is a waste of a high profile site.

Image Image

My biggest disappointment is one local shoe shop on the corner of Chapel Street / William Street for doing shag-all with its shop front since Cruises Street opened.
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby Tuborg » Thu Sep 23, 2010 7:03 pm

The Sports 2000 building you refer to has been shamefully neglected. Imagine how well it would look if its brickwork was restored and an appropriate shopfront installed. Its one of the largest buildings on the street aswell but currently it’s being totally wasted with the upper floors either being used for storage or they could possibly be entirely vacant.

It really needs to be completely refurbished & reconfigured if it’s ever going to attract a major retailer again. It would probably also benefit from a relocation of the bus stop from that part of William Street. It might remove the scobe element that currently festers in that area!

Just as an aside I notice that the former Ferguson’s premises on the corner of O’Connell Street & Thomas Street is currently shrouded in scaffolding. They seem to be re-roofing & cleaning the building and there may also be some internal alterations taking place too. Hopefully this is in preparation for a new occupier.
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby CologneMike » Thu Sep 23, 2010 9:04 pm

Tuborg wrote:Just as an aside I notice that the former Ferguson’s premises on the corner of O’Connell Street & Thomas Street is currently shrouded in scaffolding. They seem to be re-roofing & cleaning the building and there may also be some internal alterations taking place too. Hopefully this is in preparation for a new occupier.


Image Image

Would be great if they could remove the paint from the brick on the Thomas Street gable too.
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby CologneMike » Thu Sep 23, 2010 9:10 pm

Marie Hobbins writes in this week’s Limerick Post where Vincent Murray (City Council Senior Engineer) discloses details for John’s Square.


[INDENT]. . . . . . . As part of the Orbital Route rollout and the high quality environment plan for John’s Square, Mr Murray added it is hoped to be in construction in early 2011.

“A one-way system here will reduce traffic to the square by 50% - there will be safety lighting installed and linkages to the city.”[/INDENT]

Post below from 29th November 2008

jpsartre wrote:These are some pictures from the John's Sq. planning app. They're going to use Kilkenny blue limestone all the way from the monument to Gerald Griffin St./William St. which will be kind of classy and a bit different to the French(?) limestone, Granite and pc slab they've used at Thomas St. etc. Lighting will play a big part in the scheme with all the buildings and trees being uplit. The pendant lighting thing is new to me but looks damn cool in the cg viz. imo. I also like the boules paving thing, wonder how that'll go down in the town!, continental style outdoor bowling http://www.petanqueromania.ro/petanque_p84.html
Attachments
JohnsSquare1.jpg
JohnsSquare1.jpg (58.35 KiB) Viewed 10178 times
JohnsSquare2.jpg
JohnsSquare2.jpg (30.12 KiB) Viewed 10178 times
JohnsSquare3.jpg
JohnsSquare3.jpg (61.15 KiB) Viewed 10179 times
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby CologneMike » Tue Oct 05, 2010 9:12 pm

Image

Statue of Patrick Sarsfield 1881 (NIAH)

[INDENT]'This memorial was inaugurated by the reformed corporation in 1841. Lay dormant with some spasmodic attempts at resuscitation until 1875 when the Mayor of that year Ambrose Hall J.P. took the matter up and continued such brought to completion.'[/INDENT]

It took 40 years to erect it . . . . . after standing 130 years on Cathedral Place . . . . . we will probably spend decades on discussing plans to move it to a more prominent location on John’s Square.

See latest poll on Limerick Post.
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby Tuborg » Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:15 am


Limerick City Centre Inner Orbital Route Phase 3

R445 Clare Street/Abbey Bridge/Lelia Street Traffic Management Scheme

Phase 3 of the scheme provides for the removal of the Abbey Bridge Roundabout and the provision of traffic signal control at Abbey Bridge/Clare Street and Clare Street/Lelia Street junctions. Work has commenced on site on 30th September and will be completed by the end of November ahead of the peak Christmas 2010 shopping period.

The Clare Street/Lelia Street junction will be junction 1 on the Inner Orbital Route and once the Inner Orbital Route is fully completed will allow for controlled and orderly movement of traffic in and out of the core City centre. For the Pedestrianisation of O’Connell Street to proceed it will be necessary to direct some inbound City traffic from Clare Street via Cathedral Place to the City Centre as traffic entering the City via Charlottes Quay onto Patrick Street will be directed up William Street.

The removal of roundabouts in City centre locations and their replacements with traffic signals whilst sometimes controversial is necessary where consideration of safe pedestrian movement and cycling mobility is given detailed consideration.

Traffic light controlled junctions are proven to be much safer junctions for pedestrians and cyclists. This location adjacent to the Pennywell and Garryowen and Grove Island residential communities and L.I.T. college of Art and the recreational amenities of the canal bank walks and cycle paths has generated pedestrian and cycle road crossing demands which cannot now be safely accommodated at the Abbey Bridge Roundabout and Clare Street Lelia Street junction.

The scheme will include the provision of new footpaths on Clare Street in high quality materials, new public lighting, CCTV, pedestrian crossings and new tree planting near the canal entrance



Project layout: Sheet 1, Sheet 2, Sheet 3

No loss here, the Abbey Bridge roundabout had a horrible layout & lots of motorists seemed to have great difficulty navigating it. I hope the remodelling job extends to removing all outdated signage aswell. Clare Street hasn't been the N7 for six and a half years now! :rolleyes:

Next up for the chop is the Shannon Bridge roundabout, the wisdom of which I'm much more sceptical about.

Image
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby Tuborg » Sun Mar 13, 2011 8:32 pm

Spotted this recently.

I really don't feel that traffic lights are needed here. In my experience the Shannon Bridge roundabout isn't a significant congestion point and in the main traffic flows quite smoothly through it.

Traffic lights seem to be all the rage in Limerick City Hall at the moment. New sets have been switched on in recent weeks on the Dock Road and Clare Street.

Limerick City Council’s u-turn on traffic lights at roundabout

Image

An artists impression of the proposed new junction at Shannon Bridge


By Petula Martyn

CONTROVERSIAL plans to replace the Shannon roundabout with a set of traffic lights as part of the city’s new orbital route has been deferred by Limerick City Council.

The opening of the Limerick Tunnel which has resulted in a dramatic decline in traffic volumes in the city has given the local authority major scope to upgrade this entrance to the city, and the council wanted to replace the roundabout which links the Shannon Bridge with the Dock Road with traffic lights.

When the proposed development was first mooted, councillors were told that the roundabout had “outgrown its usefulness as a traffic management tool” and a controlled junction would allow for better traffic management. It appears the city council has done a U-turn on the proposed change to the city’s road infrastructure and has opted to defer the change indefinitely.

Soft landscaping work will still proceed at the junction.

The vast majority of councillors expressed their opposition to the proposal. During a heated discussion on the issue last year, Cllr John Gilligan said the city engineers “seem to have a mania” about traffic lights and he said replacing the Shannon roundabout with traffic lights would, in his view, be a “backward step.”

Cllr Maurice Quinlivan said residents on the northside of the city had huge concerns over the impact of the proposed change and he said: “If it is not broken, don’t fix it.”
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby demolition man » Fri Sep 09, 2011 2:47 am

Had a look today at the stone pavement they are laying down for William Street. Not really impressed by the quality as it looks both cheap and dull and adds little to the dreariness of William Street especially on a wet miserable limerick day as was today. Although some people here believe that the stone used for Bedford Row and Thomas Street is too colorful and false looking I believe that had the council used it for William street it would bring some continuation and lightness to the street. Other options could have been to use the paving used along O'Callaghan and Clancy Strands. Something that would spark this prominent street with a much need revival. But no. What now seems to be unfolding for William Street is a grey and dank street scape that will go in hand with many of its surrounding buildings and will no doubt be a continuing embarrassment for years to come for this city.

In fairness whatever the council puts down it will probably be covered in gum by yobs in a couple of months whilst waiting for their buses outside champion. Should just have left it the way it was.
demolition man
Member
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 3:46 am

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby foinse » Mon Sep 12, 2011 8:11 am

The stuff on Thomas Street, and Bedford Row is a bloody dangerous nightmare. One drop of rain and it becomes too slippy to handle, I've almost ended up on my arse a number of times because of it. It's not suitable to the climate, it does look nice but putting it in a city that has as much rainfall as we do is idiotic.

The stuff on William Street looks good imho, It's clean and well put together. Sure it doesn't look as fancy as Thomas St or Bedford Row, but at least it's safe to walk on 365 days of the year.
foinse
Member
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2008 10:06 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby Goofy » Mon Sep 12, 2011 12:10 pm

I think William Street is looking great. The council obviously have a much smaller budget for this than the Thomas street project. They simply could not afford to pave the entire street in natural stone. What they have done is clean and in keeping with the style set out on the other streets already finished. William street was a huge embarrasmet on the city before. I think this is a huge improvement, something to encorage not moan about.
Goofy
Member
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 12:45 am

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Tue Sep 13, 2011 5:31 pm

foinse wrote:The stuff on Thomas Street, and Bedford Row is a bloody dangerous nightmare. One drop of rain and it becomes too slippy to handle, I've almost ended up on my arse a number of times because of it. It's not suitable to the climate, it does look nice but putting it in a city that has as much rainfall as we do is idiotic.

The stuff on William Street looks good imho, It's clean and well put together. Sure it doesn't look as fancy as Thomas St or Bedford Row, but at least it's safe to walk on 365 days of the year.


I've never had that problem. Maybe you should buy a better pair of shoes.
rumpelstiltskin
Member
 
Posts: 229
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 6:51 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby demolition man » Tue Sep 13, 2011 6:45 pm

Maybe there was a lower budget this time around but it shouldn't detract on quality.Passing through Mitchelstown recently I noticed how large natural stone was used along much of the lower main street there. The effect is a very attractive street scape which I assume wouldn't have been hugely expensive or indeed anything more than limerick City Council could replicate for William Street.Limerick on the other hand should be aiming for something infinitely more attractive than what is unfolding now. It may be 'fine' but for one of Limerick's most important streets it should be grander.I know it may seem like a moan but limerick as the major shopping destination in the region and as a tourist attraction should be aiming for higher standards.
demolition man
Member
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 3:46 am

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby foinse » Tue Sep 13, 2011 8:14 pm

rumpelstiltskin wrote:
foinse wrote:The stuff on Thomas Street, and Bedford Row is a bloody dangerous nightmare. One drop of rain and it becomes too slippy to handle, I've almost ended up on my arse a number of times because of it. It's not suitable to the climate, it does look nice but putting it in a city that has as much rainfall as we do is idiotic.

The stuff on William Street looks good imho, It's clean and well put together. Sure it doesn't look as fancy as Thomas St or Bedford Row, but at least it's safe to walk on 365 days of the year.


I've never had that problem. Maybe you should buy a better pair of shoes.


Nothing wrong with my shoes mate, I've a wide range from Haix boots, to asics runners, to leather soled dress shoes, skate shoes and casual shoes.

I have also been on crutches for the last 6 months. Trust me I've had nothing but problems with that paving, to the extent that I avoid those streets unless it's dry. Or in the case of Thomas Street, I walk in the road on the cobblelock, also the majority of the people I know agree with me on this.

I will say that while wearing the Haix boots (work shoes) is the only time I have any bit of grip on that surface.
foinse
Member
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Tue Jun 10, 2008 10:06 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby gunter » Tue Sep 13, 2011 11:32 pm

I think it's the limestone bands in the Thomas Street paving that become particularly slippery in the wet.

I can understand them wanting to use limestone in Limerick, but it probably is a small bit reckless all the same.

Image
the pedestrianized part of Thomas St.

We've got to find some more elegant solution to the public seating challenge other than the diagonal tank-trap slab, here joined by a particularly sad looking bunch of petrified pouffes.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1905
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby GrahamH » Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:15 pm

Yes, unlike other stones, there is an unwritten rulebook for the use of limestone. This is often ignored in places where a strong tradition for its use exists, like Limerick, where it oozes from every facet of its composition.

Image



Image



Image


As demonstrated in gunter's picture above, limestone should never be used where it can get soiled. It looks shockingly bad with even the most subtle of staining. Public seating is a classic example. Bollards or elements that get brushed and otherwise abused are another.

The lower end of the Thomas Street scheme is too cluttered and too busy in my view - so much so, it's an area I can't get away from quick enough as the whole ensemble wrecks my head. What sort of entrance is this to a street?

Image


As one looks down, pointless and frustrating obstacles abound, such as the ridiculous pouffes that are nothing short of visual litter, as with the benches. The paving pattern is also too busy, scrappy and lacking in coherence. while demarcated sections lack function and are rendered somewhat meaningless. It all has the feeling of a cheap Spanish bathroom from Right Price Tiles, where a detailed interior aesthetic has been brought out into the open and magnified by 50. This type of practice abounds in Irish and British public realm design and is thoroughly unsatisfactory. There is nothing worse than a street being given finnicky treatment instead of the strength, clout and civic punch that a public place should exude.

Image


Not to be harsh, one need only wander / quickly run to a side street for sanity to be relieved by elegant simplicity. How refreshing.

Image


Likewise, paring things back on Bedford Row (below) so much better. The same can be said of the upper end of Thomas Street, where the strength of simple treatment harmonises with the confident streetscape to create something memorable, inviting and civic.

Image

The grubby pouffes still need to be ditched. I'm sure there's a harbour somewhere that needs reinforcement.

Very exciting things are happening on Augustinian Lane with the stunning new limestone paving. It has been laid with craft, simplicity and understanding of context. One of the few places in Ireland that a sophisticated and completely unexpected European vibe leaps out at you. Wonderful to see side streets being treated this way - to such a degree, it would nearly do Limerick a favour to get these linkages right than spend all the cash on big bang schemes for the main streets.

Image

Magical.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby GrahamH » Wed Sep 14, 2011 10:40 pm

Fergurson's looks great since its makeover. One of the few modest buildings in Limerick that has been given subtle and appropriate treatment. More of this please.

Image

(shame the gable wasn't stripped of paint, but at least the red gloss is fun and traditional)


I didn't think the Centra franchise could get much worse.

Image


Ryan's obviously know better. Fine standards in the planning department as ever.

Image


Finally, while one might say that any improvement of public realm has to be welcomed, in the case of charming Baker Place it would have been better if nothing at all was carried out. If ever there was a categoric case of applying the wrong solution to a space, the recent works are it. The array of kerbs, steps, bollards and other ridiculous demarcations are proof that Irish road planners rule the roost when it comes to public realm. Frankly, they shouldn't be allowed anywhere near it.

Image

The second you arrive in Baker Place as an outsider, what immediately strikes you is the open plan nature of the space, and how the entire surface should be treated as one - roads, pavements and civic area. Traffic needs to be ground down to 30kmph and a single, plain, strong array of stone bollards used to demarcate the roads. Otherwise, the entire square surface should be composed of fine compacted gravel, with the clock proudly standing in classic European urban tradition as a focal point to the area. Unfortunately as is, the whole ensemble - an important part of Limerick's hierarchy of public spaces - is gridded out, chopped up and politely pulverised, not by urban designers, but road engineers.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Thu Sep 15, 2011 3:08 am

demolition man wrote:Maybe there was a lower budget this time around but it shouldn't detract on quality.Passing through Mitchelstown recently I noticed how large natural stone was used along much of the lower main street there. The effect is a very attractive street scape which I assume wouldn't have been hugely expensive or indeed anything more than limerick City Council could replicate for William Street.Limerick on the other hand should be aiming for something infinitely more attractive than what is unfolding now. It may be 'fine' but for one of Limerick's most important streets it should be grander.I know it may seem like a moan but limerick as the major shopping destination in the region and as a tourist attraction should be aiming for higher standards.


Well unfortunately William Street will always be a dump unless they sort out the buildings. It's such a shame because if Limerick cleaned up places like William Street it could be the handsomest city in Ireland - a lot of its beauty remains. It's a testament to badly handled it is that a grotty non-destination like Cork attracts more visitors than stately Limerick.
rumpelstiltskin
Member
 
Posts: 229
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 6:51 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby pigtown » Thu Sep 15, 2011 11:27 pm

rumpelstiltskin wrote:
Well unfortunately William Street will always be a dump unless they sort out the buildings. It's such a shame because if Limerick cleaned up places like William Street it could be the handsomest city in Ireland - a lot of its beauty remains. It's a testament to badly handled it is that a grotty non-destination like Cork attracts more visitors than stately Limerick.


While I really like Limerick city and think it is very under-rated and appreciated, I don't think you could call it stately. To me, stately implies grand thoroughfares, squares and public buildings. While you could make a case for the Hunt museum and the Carnegie building in Pery Sq., personally I can't think of any grand thoroughfare. And while the peoples park is very nice, one nice park in the city centre is not enough to call it 'stately'. ( By the way, does anyone else think the former Finucanes Electrical site on Thomas Street would make a lovely little city garden like a smaller version of the Horts del Rei gardens in Palma? http://www.360cities.net/image/horts-de ... ,6.56,69.0 )

I also have to stick up for Cork here. It has plenty of charm and while I absolutely hate the upgrade they gave to Patrick Street, it is a buzzing city that could give Limerick a lesson on how to be a relevant small city in the 21st century.
pigtown
Member
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:50 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby CologneMike » Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:07 pm

Image

Larger image

Archaeologist to supervise upgrade of John’s Square (Limerick Leader)

By David Hurley

Published on Wednesday 14 September 2011

A FULL-time archaeologist has been appointed to supervise major upgrade works at the historic John’s Square.
Work began earlier this week as part of a €1 million upgrade of the area, which was approved by Limerick City Council more than two years ago.

The works, which are expected to continue until the end of the year, will see new surfaces being laid, the pedestrianisation of part of the square and the introduction of a one-way traffic system.

A full-time archaeologist has been appointed to work on the project due to the historic significance of the area.
According to Vincent Murray, senior executive engineer at Limerick City Council, it is likely there will be a number of significant archaeological finds during the works.

“There could be a lot of bones and remains due to the number of sieges and wars that took place in the area,” he said adding that the upgrade works could be delayed if there is a find of major archaeological importance.

“It is an immensely historic area and I have no idea what the archaeologists are going to find down there but I am certain they will find some artifacts,” said Cllr Diarmuid Scully, who is the author of ‘Unconquered City’ which is set during the Siege of Limerick in 1690


Image

Larger image

Nice photos Graham and interesting observations too.

I believe Nicholas de Jung Associates have been the main force behind Limerick’s remodelling and pedestrianisation.

I hope they get the upgrade of John’s Square right (materials and design).

John's Square Layout Map (see pdf)
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Sat Sep 17, 2011 12:03 am

pigtown wrote:
rumpelstiltskin wrote:
Well unfortunately William Street will always be a dump unless they sort out the buildings. It's such a shame because if Limerick cleaned up places like William Street it could be the handsomest city in Ireland - a lot of its beauty remains. It's a testament to badly handled it is that a grotty non-destination like Cork attracts more visitors than stately Limerick.


While I really like Limerick city and think it is very under-rated and appreciated, I don't think you could call it stately. To me, stately implies grand thoroughfares, squares and public buildings. While you could make a case for the Hunt museum and the Carnegie building in Pery Sq., personally I can't think of any grand thoroughfare. And while the peoples park is very nice, one nice park in the city centre is not enough to call it 'stately'. ( By the way, does anyone else think the former Finucanes Electrical site on Thomas Street would make a lovely little city garden like a smaller version of the Horts del Rei gardens in Palma? http://www.360cities.net/image/horts-de ... ,6.56,69.0 )

I also have to stick up for Cork here. It has plenty of charm and while I absolutely hate the upgrade they gave to Patrick Street, it is a buzzing city that could give Limerick a lesson on how to be a relevant small city in the 21st century.


Ok, maybe stately is over the top in European terms, but in terms of what remains of its history Limerick is far superior to Cork in every respect. Almost everything in Cork is 19th and 20th century. There isn't a single block in Cork, let alone a street, that can compete with the coherent Georgian streets which remain in Limerick, and the only medieval structure in Cork city is some bit of wall in the middle of a housing estate. If you look at old pictures of William Street, with its turn of the century shopfronts and sash windows, it's really as pretty and buzzing as any street in Ireland - and for the top two thirds of the street almost all of these buildings are still there. In terms of looks and potential tourism - its riverside location, its medieval features, its Georgian buildings - Limerick outstrips anything Cork has to offer. And it is precisely this fact, that Cork is a much more pleasant city to walk around and gets so much more tourism, which highlights how tragically mismanaged and neglected Limerick is.
rumpelstiltskin
Member
 
Posts: 229
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 6:51 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby pigtown » Wed Sep 28, 2011 10:39 pm

rumpelstiltskin wrote:Ok, maybe stately is over the top in European terms, but in terms of what remains of its history Limerick is far superior to Cork in every respect. Almost everything in Cork is 19th and 20th century. There isn't a single block in Cork, let alone a street, that can compete with the coherent Georgian streets which remain in Limerick, and the only medieval structure in Cork city is some bit of wall in the middle of a housing estate. If you look at old pictures of William Street, with its turn of the century shopfronts and sash windows, it's really as pretty and buzzing as any street in Ireland - and for the top two thirds of the street almost all of these buildings are still there. In terms of looks and potential tourism - its riverside location, its medieval features, its Georgian buildings - Limerick outstrips anything Cork has to offer. And it is precisely this fact, that Cork is a much more pleasant city to walk around and gets so much more tourism, which highlights how tragically mismanaged and neglected Limerick is.


OK, after spending what felt like an age waiting for the bus on William Street I see what you mean about there being lots of nice buildings on the street that I had never noticed before. There are also a fair few ugly builings on the street such as the Peter Mark/GameStop bunker, Brown Thomas, Guineys, Kwik E Mart, to name a few.

The paving is working out really well but I dont like the fact that there was only one tree on the street when I saw it last.
pigtown
Member
 
Posts: 35
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2009 6:50 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby Goofy » Tue Oct 04, 2011 12:34 pm

pigtown wrote:

The paving is working out really well but I dont like the fact that there was only one tree on the street when I saw it last.


But there is not much they can do about that. Most of the buildings have cellars that extend out under ther roadway. There is not enough soil under the footpath for the roots to bed into properly. If they planted loads of trees on the street, they would be all uprooted by the next big storm to roll in off the atlantic
Goofy
Member
 
Posts: 46
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2007 12:45 am

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby CologneMike » Fri Nov 30, 2012 11:39 pm

John’s Square

The renovated square looks really well at night and it is especially more appealing to the eye when it is empty of parked cars.

But what’s the story with the 5 temporary traffic signs (red/white concrete bases) as the square is now some months finished?

Image Liv Kenley

Image
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: City Centre Remodelling and Pedestrianisation

Postby Tuborg » Thu Jan 10, 2013 5:52 pm

CologneMike wrote:John’s Square

But what’s the story with the 5 temporary traffic signs (red/white concrete bases) as the square is now some months finished?



The offending works signage was belatedly removed not long before Christmas. Just the 4 or 5 months after the job was completed. :clap:

Just a pity they didn't take away those gimmicky black bollards while they were at it. No Limerick public realm remodelling scheme is complete it seems without squeezing in as many pointless and inappropriate bollards as possible!

I understand that some kind of physical indicator is needed to denote the roadway running through the square but why not go for football shaped stone bollards rather than the rubbish that was chosen.

On a separate note. Looking at the recent City Council budget document it seems that no funding will be available for the long overdue O'Connell Street revamp until 2015. Fourteen years after the plans were first mooted. :crazy:
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Previous

Return to Ireland