'Dutch Billys'

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby Paul Clerkin » Wed Jun 29, 2011 9:44 pm

I seem to recall that house is supposedly haunted.
User avatar
Paul Clerkin
Old Master
 
Posts: 5427
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 1999 1:00 am
Location: Monaghan

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Tue Jul 05, 2011 9:34 pm

Image

If there is anyone haunting the house, there's a good chance that it's the mother, Ellen Allen.

According to 'A Christian Philanthropist of Dublin - a memoir of Richard Allen', by Hannah Maria Wigham, published in 1886 and available on-line [from which the Victorian print on the last page was plundered], despite being of 'delicate health', Ellen produced roughly a child a year for the first fifteen years following her marriage in 1798, before climbing into her grave in 1819, where she may - or may not - rest in peace.

I don't know Boooooog if I'd mention that to Mrs. Boooooog.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby Punchbowl » Tue Jul 05, 2011 11:38 pm

Chilling, and pretty much ends all my hopes of ever living in it, and indeed, courting Mrs Allen... Shame.. One of the most interesting houses on that stretch. There's another building further on, which I can't recall right now, that always had me curious.. will return with more info when I've stopped moping.
Punchbowl
Member
 
Posts: 128
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2004 2:22 pm
Location: Echlin St

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Mon Jul 25, 2011 4:27 am

Image

The second paper is by Brendan Twomey who comes from a banking background and is entitled ‘Speculative property development in eighteenth century Dublin’.

In the first half of the paper, Twomey outlines the rapid growth of Dublin in the crucial first half of the 18th century and illustrates the unfolding scene with quotes from contemporary commentators who frequently noted, not always approvingly, the dramatic scale of the city’s expansion and, in the case of Swift in particular, the financial recklessness with which groups of tradesmen seemed to be going about the place borrowing heavily to build houses that they often didn’t have the financial means to finish. As always with Swift, the commentary in the piece is almost incidental to the target of the piece, which in that instance was ‘a certain fanatic brewer’ identified subsequently as Joseph Leeson of Stephen’s Green, who, according to Swift, was busy amassing a vast property portfolio by picking up these unfinished speculative houses at distressed selling prices.

In the second part of his paper, Twomey follows the financial trail of William Hendrick, an ambitious but inexperienced property developer, in what ultimately became a tale of riches to rags. Hendrick’s stomping ground was the area between the Royal Barracks and Smithfield, where the construction of Bloody Bridge and land reclamation between it and Bridewell Bridge had opened up development opportunities. At this time, the early decades of the 18th century, Smithfield would have been fairly comprehensively developed following the initiative of Dublin Corporation forty years earlier and was occupied mostly by merchant types availing of the proximity to the markets. Queen Street, with a parade of grand houses looking westward over the grounds of the Blue Coat School and the Bowling Green complex with its Banqueting house pavilions was perhaps the most prestigious address in the district, however by the time Hendrick appeared on the scene around 1718, there were already clear indications that Queen Street had begun to lose its fashionability and house construction in the area in general was settling into the lower to middle income bracket, with just a couple of exceptions. Barrack Street and its continuation eastward, Tighe Street, [Gravel walk on Rocque] were filling out with largely three storey houses on 18 – 21 foot wide plots almost from the moment the Barracks project began in 1701, with a high percentage of houses distinguishable in the records as inns or taverns, all of them with conspicuously English signs such as The Robin Hood, The Star and Garter, The White Lyon, The Three Crowns etc.

What only slightly comes across in Twomey’s account is that Hendrick was a pinky in a pond full of sharks.

The land that Hendrick set out to develop, and which included Hendrick Street, was a part of the Bowling Green site which the sharp-as-nails Tighe family had contrived to acquire title to from Dublin Corporation. Presumably this acquisition had originally been intended to comprise some kind of stewardship role over one of the city’s grandest recreational amenities, but by 1724 Richard Tighe, ‘one of his majesty’s most honourable Privy Council of the Kingdom of Ireland’ had succeeded in having all the restrictive covenants on the property lifted and before you could say ‘rezoning bonanza’ he was flogging the site for residential development.

What Tighe sold Hendrick [John] in 1724 was a leasehold of a part of the Bowling Green site, subject to an annual rent of £180 sterling. Servicing an annual debt of that magnitude was a big ask for a novice property developer and to be a successful venture it would have required the off-loading of a substantial number of building plot leases quickly, given that individual building leases typically started out with at least the first half year at a peppercorn rent.

Leaving the Hendricks to assemble the infrastructure and market the development, in May 1728 Tighe sold on what amounted to the freehold of the entire Bowling Green site [excluding the site on which the city stables had previously been built] to Luke Gardiner for £4,020 sterling [RD 57, 165 37830], passing the Hendricks on to a new ground landlord in the process.

Luke Gardiner; the Dutch Billy Years, remains an unexplored episode, so we’ll have to wait awhile to find out whether L.G. was an active developer of the Bowling Green site or still just a money man and property speculator at this time. Not having the deep pockets of Luke Gardiner, Twomey explains Hendrick’s subsequent financial difficulties in the late 1720s on bad timing; ‘. . . the Irish economy experienced several years of recession which culminated in the famine of 1729’ and while there may be something to this, the conspicuously boom years of the mid 1720s would have brought their own perils in the form of intense competition. The impression given in Registry of Deeds records for the mid 1720s is of a city in a frenzy of speculative development, perhaps not unlike our own recent brush with insanity.

The eastward expansion of the city was becoming relentless in the 1720s with Henry Street, Abbey Street and Jervis Quay [Bachelor’s Walk] stretching development ever eastward on the north side of the river and with Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, Poolbeg Street and Lazer’s Hill [Townsend Street] stretching development eastward on the south side of the river. South of the College, urban development had reached the line of Dawson Street and in June 1726 Richard, Lord Molesworth, launched the development of the ‘Molesworth Fields’ with an advertisement in the Dublin Weekly Journal where punters were enticed with 99 years leases [for which he didn’t yet have parliamentary approval] and invited to view a ‘plan of the lotts, streets etc’ at his agent’s offices in Peter Street. Further to the southwest, even the dormant Aungier Estate had suddenly kicked back into life in 1725 with the Longford inheritance finally settled on Michael Cuffe and Robert Macartney and where new streets and densification was spear-headed by the arrival of major development figures; Jacob Poole and David Diggs LaTouche. All of this outward expansion was in addition to the on-going renewal and densification of the city centre and the on-going filling out of the streets in the Liberties where the most recent additions, Poole Street and Braithwaite Street were newly laid out in the early 1720s.

Add into the mixture the aforementioned Luke Gardiner fermenting his plans for the Bolton Street area and it’s not hard to see how Hendrick might have had a job on his hands at the best of times getting attention for his little development venture westward of Smithfield, in a location now primarily associated with the Barracks, live animal markets, service yards, middle income housing and a Temple Bar density of pubs.

Whether it was a general recession in the economy or intense competition from more fashionably located developments, William Hendrick appears to have been caught with development plots he couldn’t sell and with exposure to both his ground landlord and his private financial backers [the Bury family from Limerick]. By 1731 his goose was cooked and Hendrick was cooling his heels in Debtor’s Prison.

In fairness to Twomey, this is gripping stuff, but what we don’t get from Twomey’s account is any tangible information on the actual houses that all these development energies and financial speculations were producing, and there are worrying indications that Twomey is under the impression that these houses were Georgian.

This is a statement from early on in Twomey’s paper;

‘Most of the domestic buildings built prior to 1720 were of the Dutch Billy type. However from that date the form, which is now seen as the epitome of Georgian Dublin, began to appear.’

Straight away, this statement is decades wide of the mark and a glance at pictures of the six earliest Hendrick Street houses or the three longest surviving Haymarket houses, illustrates that point clearly. The Haymarket houses are perhaps even more interesting because of the involvement of the Tighes.

Image Image
Image Image
Images of Robert Tighe’s house at no. 4 Haymarket [the tall one] with the two Billys to the west also developed by Robert Tighe and sold to John Stones and Adam Blomfield respectively. In the last image, no 4 has lost its roof and attic storey and nos. 5 + 6 have been re-fronted as two-bay houses

These three Haymarket houses were originally classic Dutch Billys, developed by Robert Tighe in 1724 and incorporating all the characteristic features; shared corner chimney stacks, cruciform roofs, tidy closet returns and [originally] three bay facades reducing to a single window in the attic storey which [we can conjecture from typological studies] were each framed in a curvilinear and pedimented gable. Grainy 19th century images suggest that nos. 5 and 6 featured that peculiarity often seen in pairs [examples on Longford St. and Stephen’s Green South] where one of the pair was given a two bay arrangement on the first floor [of a wider window dimension] in an otherwise three-bay composition. This pair of Billys adjoined Robert Tighe’s taller house to the east, which itself adjoined the colourfully named ‘Cat and Bagpipes’ inn. The three houses had extensive vaults underneath not just the houses themselves but under the back yards and coach houses as well, vault structures that may conceivably still exist under the 20th century layers.

Whether it is by coincidence or not, the houses developed or acquired by at least two of the sons of Richard Tighe were among the sharpest Billys for which records survive. Robert Tighe, as we’ve seen, lived at the exceptionally tall gabled house at no. 4 Haymarket, the one which subsequently had Robert Emmet associations and which, with its two neighbours, was demolished in the 1980s for the blank concrete block wall of the Tully’s Tiles emporium. Robert’s younger brother, Stern Tighe, lived at no. 12 Usher’s Quay [illustrated elsewhere in the book]. The latter house featured not just, precision crafted, limestone downpipes, but also a richly carved stairs to complement its beautifully panelled interior.

Image Image
Image Image
Images of Stern Tighe’s house at no. 12 Usher’s Quay

Despite their abundant architectural merit, it was perhaps the very fact that these formerly gabled houses, and hundreds more like them, did not perfectly fit the Georgian profile that they were so readily swept away for the most mundane of replacements.

With the couple of misgivings noted above, Brendan Twomey’s article sheds valuable light on a period that has been neglected for too long.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby Paul Clerkin » Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:58 pm

User avatar
Paul Clerkin
Old Master
 
Posts: 5427
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 1999 1:00 am
Location: Monaghan

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Wed Sep 07, 2011 11:41 pm

. . . . as if we ever take them off.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby ctesiphon » Thu Sep 08, 2011 11:12 pm

Paul Clerkin wrote:Get your anoraks ready gentlemen
http://archiseek.com/2011/dublins-dutch ... onference/


Is there a date, or do my eyes deceive me?

***

Just spent a most intriguing evening catching up on the last few pages of this thread. Hats off to all concerned.
User avatar
ctesiphon
Old Master
 
Posts: 1949
Joined: Fri Apr 01, 2005 3:39 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby StephenC » Fri Sep 09, 2011 12:19 am

12th October www.dublincivictrust.ie

Be there or be square!
User avatar
StephenC
Old Master
 
Posts: 2497
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2001 12:00 am
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby GrahamH » Tue Oct 04, 2011 11:37 pm

The final few available seats are filling up quickly, so interested parties are advised to book over the next couple of days!

Image

Image
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4589
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby Satrastar » Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:10 am

I would have loved to have gone, but this is held midweek during work hours.

Is trua é sin....
Satrastar
Member
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Fri Nov 28, 2008 5:07 pm

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby Paul Clerkin » Fri Oct 14, 2011 1:56 pm

So how was the day?

Synopsis here of the proceedings
http://wastedonarchaeology.wordpress.co ... ame-is-on/
User avatar
Paul Clerkin
Old Master
 
Posts: 5427
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 1999 1:00 am
Location: Monaghan

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Fri Oct 14, 2011 10:11 pm

That wasn't a bad synopsis . . . . for an archaeologist.

Can't wait to read 'Dutch Billys, the clay pipe evidence', z z z z z z , I just hope we're not witnessing the first sods of a turf war.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Sat Oct 22, 2011 3:03 am

There was a lot of interesting new material aired in that seminar which we should have a look back at in due course.

Image

We looked at this pair of former Billys at 27 and 28 South Anne Street before. It appears from lease records that they were amongst the earliest houses built on South Anne Street in late 1724 or early 1725.

Image

The large corner site [outlined in red] was sold by Joshua Dawson to William Wilde in January 1718 under a 999 year lease which contained a covenant that required Wilde to build, ’within seven years from the date of the lease . . . . good fashionable houses to all that part fronting Anne Street’.

It seems that Wilde initially developed four houses on the Grafton Street frontage adjoining the house of a retired Huguenot soldier, Colonel Blosset, at no. 43, but it wasn’t until close to the seven year deadline in 1725 that he completed the first two houses on the South Anne Street frontage. These two houses were the pair at nos. 27 and 28.

In Sept. 1725 Wilde sold on the remainder of the site [outlined in blue] to a bricklayer, Ralph Evans, granting him ‘free liberty of building and resting timber in all the walls and gable ends of the said William Wilde’s house, backside, yard or garden, coach house or stable on the east . . . and a like liberty of bearing timber in Captain Pechell’s gable end [no. 39 Grafton St.] on the south’. Capt. Samuel de Pechels was another retired Huguenot officer who had served in Schomberg’s Regiment during the Williamite campaign.

Image

Pechell’s house, in modernized 3-bay Georgian form, shows up in a late 19th century stereo image of Grafton Street [second house on the right], but the house beyond it, no. 38, was still recognisably a Billy at this stage with its characteristic window arrangement and low hopper heads.

Wilde seems to have had a preference for clean-cut, two-bay, Billys with uncomplicated, single bay, attic storeys under cruciform roofs and a good 19th century image of the east corner house on Molesworth Street / South Frederick Street, developed by Wilde in 1733 or shortly thereafter, survives although the house itself was rebuilt shortly afterwards.

Image

This, along with the neighbouring terrace, also developed by Wilde and afterwards Georgianized, was swept away in the 1970s for the bland office block that now houses the Passport Office. Nevertheless, the Molesworth Street image gives us a pretty clear idea what the pair of Anne Street houses originally looked like.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Tue Nov 01, 2011 2:15 am

The same house type as the pair of Wilde houses on South Anne Street is this survivor at no. 50 Mary Street opposite St Mary’s Church.

Image

No. 50, outlined on Rocque’s map of 1756.

Image

The house is just hidden by the church in this Lawrence photograph that shows the adjoining house at no. 51 with its characteristic Georgianized version of a two-bay Billy façade.

Image

Despite the loss of it roof and attic storey, the house is included on the list of Protected Structures, probably due to the fact that it [until recently] retained a significant amount of its original internal panelling.

Dublin City Council’s Conservation officer objected to a recent planning application for a new shop-front to a Polish shop across the facades of nos. 49 and 50 Mary Street on the basis of a withering report on the destructive effect of unauthorised works being undertaken at the premises.

The Conservation Officer’s report records;

The removal of surviving sections of historic panelling on the left and right hand side of the staircase [internal spine wall] at ground floor level.

Damage to surviving lath and plaster internal walls and insertion of unauthorised steel works to internal spine walls.

The removal of a round-headed surviving section of timber sash window, frame and architrave to landing located between ground and first floor levels.

The removal of surviving sections of historic panelling and surviving section of box cornice along staircase particularly along internal spine wall where panelling was largely intact.

The removal of original window architraves to rear room windows located at first and second floor levels.

The insertion of two steel beams to the front and rear rooms which also resulted in damaging a section of original cornice to the rear room at first floor level.

Damage to section of surviving base of former panelled rear room at second floor level.

The steel bracing straps located on the upper floor levels have not been fitted to best conservation practice. The associated connection bolts are standing proud of the wall.

The internal staircase was not adequately protected during works which were ongoing at the time of my inspection.



Notwithstanding the objections of the conservation officer and the fact that the structure is the subject of ‘Live enforcement’ proceedings, the Planning Dept. merrily granted planning permission for the new shop-front two weeks ago.

From peeking through the fanlight the extent of the internal hacking is clear as is the quality of the original panelling and timber cornice where it has survived in the hallway.

Image Image

A view of the rear showing the characteristic return now largely sheeted in plastic to protect the fabric from weather damage while somebody works out what to do with the building.

Image

I’ve ghosted in the probable original profile of the front gable, based on the known precedents we've been looking at above. Unfortunately, I haven’t so far found any photographic records showing the original roof.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Mon Nov 28, 2011 12:08 am

The recent one-day Dutch Billy conference was hugely enjoyable and very useful in many ways, but it was a pity there wasn’t a bit more time for discussion.

The irrepressible Kevin B Nowlan, in top form after a recent trip to northern Poland, dominated what discussion there was with a typically strident assertion that the gabled tradition here was definitively a branch of the pan-Northern-European gabled tradition, an assertion which would be wonderful, if it were true.

It was clear from the tone of several speakers that ‘Billy' himself, despite the fact that he was observing proceedings from tapestries on both sides of the room, wasn’t getting a look in. In fact I think it would be fair to say that a certain amount of scorn was poured on the very notion that the primary subject matter of the conference, the ‘Dutch Billy’, owed anything at all to King Billy, in its origins as a architectural tradition. I think even Peter Walsh confessed to a slight embarrassment at having perpetuated the use of the term Dutch Billy in his writings on the subject which remain the authoritative texts. The problem of course arises because nobody knows for sure how Maurice Craig came up with the term, whether he rescued it from impending oblivion as an authentic piece of folk-memory, or whether it was just a witty invention.

If it was the prevailing view of the conference; that William of Orange is a red herring in all of this, which it did appear to be, then I suspect that we may be re-visiting this issue next year, provided the Civic Trust do the decent thing and turn this into an annual event.

Personally, I think the King-Billy-factor is absolutely critical to the popularity of the curvilinear gabled tradition here. In my opinion, the gabled tradition cannot be satisfactorily explained by any combination of the other factors at play; trade links, immigration, continuance of antique forms etc. etc. any one of which almost everyone present at the conference seemed to be infinitely more comfortable with as explanation enough.

I didn't want to let this issue pass without comment.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Thu Dec 08, 2011 12:14 am

So little attention has been paid to the tradition of gabled street-architecture in Britain that, against this background, it is difficult to gauge just how distinctive the Dutch Billy tradition is here.

We’ve looked at images from Kipp, Hollar and others before and we’ve found examples of English streetscape with a sprinkling of curvilinear gabled houses in them, in the second half of the 17th century. However, in general in England it would probably be fair to say that street-architecture is thought to follow a steady progression:

- post-medieval cagework houses with gable-fronts to the street [including twin and multiple gabled examples],
- through brick house types with ornamental ‘shaped’ gables,
- to houses with a parallel-to-the-street roof alignment featuring dormers and projecting eaves,
- to [by the early decades of the 18th century] the ubiquitous flat parapet terraced house template of the Georgian era.

In this sequence, the characteristically simple, concave curvilinear and pedimented, gable we recognise as a ‘Dutch’ profile [as opposed to the more complex, multiply curved, ‘Shaped’, ‘Mannerist’ or ‘Holborn’ gable] makes only a fleeting appearance.

Outside the main urban centres, hundreds of examples of manor houses and farmhouses with shaped gables survive dotted around the countryside, particularly in the brick areas of eastern England, but also occasionally in the stone built regions of Scotland and Wales, but again it is the exception rather than the rule to find the Dutch profile in this rural wing of the British gabled tradition. In Britain these ‘Mannerist’ tendencies in architectural taste tend to be explained by architectural historians as a manifestation of the Tory faction’s attachment to comfortable nostalgia, in stark contrast to the Whig preference for grand antique classicism, and its sober streetscape counterpart, soon to manifest itself in the all-conquering English Palladianism of the 18th century.

Yet however fleeting the appearance of the ‘Dutch’ gabled house was in the record of English street-architecture, given the similarities of form and the overwhelmingly English background of the property owning and artisan craft communities in Dublin at this time it is probably an inescapable conclusion that it is from this English source and not directly from Holland or some more far flung northern European gabled source that the Irish ‘Dutch Billy’ tradition grew.

I think it’s important to acknowledge this, not least because we need to know how consistent with prevailing English building practice Irish street-architecture was at a point, late in the 17th century, if we’re to grapple with just how distinctive Irish street-architecture then became in the first half of the 18th century.

Below is a detail of Francis Place’s view of Greenwich circa 1700, which gives us a glimpse of a reasonably fashionable 17th century streetscape that should be neither too provincial, nor too metropolitan [nor directly bound by London building regulations] to stand comparison with Dublin.

Image

This is the south end of Crooms Hill on the western boundary of the Greenwich Hospital grounds with - left-to-right - a house known as ‘Belvedere’ featuring a balustraded platform and cupola on the roof [somewhat similar to houses depicted in Brookings view of Stephens Green], in the middle, there is a terrace of three ‘Dutch’ gabled houses that would have sat equally comfortably into Place’s view of Dublin from the north and, on the right, a double gabled house with a pillastered façade. Only the latter structure survives today and it is described by English Heritage as dating to 1630.

Image

As depicted by Place, this last house, which is now the Presbytery to the adjoining 19th century church, is shown with ornamental ‘shaped’ gables, which would represent an elaboration of its current less ornamental form. Conversely, Place has apparently simplified the fenestration and reduced the number of pillasters on the facade, if this is in fact the same house that survives at that approximate location today, which I think it must be.

Image

A further complication arises in that there is a detailed drawing of the house as it stood in 1808 which shows a curvilinear gabled treatment that is very close in profile to the twin gabled, 5-bay, Mill-Street-type house that we’re familiar with over here, a good example of which was also to be found on Stephen’s Green.

Image
A detail of an early 19th century painting of the College of Surgeons showing the adjoining doubled gabled, 5-bay, house that originally bounded the north side of the old Quaker burial ground on the corner of York Street

Image
Brookings depiction of Stephen’s Green in 1728. I can’t remember which side of the Green this is thought to be, artistic licence has definitely been taken, but the house types are probably representative.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Tue Feb 28, 2012 1:04 am

Image

This is nos. 52 and 53 Dawson Street.

Dawson Street, as we know, was laid out for development by Joshua Dawson in 1705, or thereabouts, but although the venture was a success from the start, it took nearly twenty years for several of the plots to be developed.

Image

One plot that seems to have taken a while to develop was this one outlined in red on Rocque’s map of 1756, containing 44 foot to Dawson St. and 114 foot to Duke Street. In June 1725, Charles McEvers, carpenter, mortgaged the property to a John Darragh, silk dyer, for two sums amounting to 110 pounds ‘together with the two new houses thereon’.

The corner house [no. 52], already let by McEvers to Robert Nixon, shoemaker, and afterwards sub-let by Nixon to John Thompson, whip maker, in December 1729, was demolished in the 1950s and replaced by the present brick and concrete structure with the roundy corner.

No. 53, however, substantially survives behind a stuccoed 19th century façade.

Image

From the rear we can see that the roof pitch has been lowered [or the wall plates raised], but otherwise the characteristic Billy elements; single large composite chimney, closet return with corresponding signature step-in in the plane of the rear gable wall, and particularly fine flush-framed and slightly arched window, are all there.

Image

On the Duke Street frontage of this block, two houses with substantial Billy fabric survive at ‘The Duke’ [nos. 8 + 9]

Image

These two were never quite the pair that they appear on Rocque. No. 8 appears to have been developed by Robert Arthur, who had held the adjoining, double house, plot on Dawson Street since 1709 and the appended Duke Street plot was certainly developed prior to 1722 when this house on the corner of the Stable Lane was in the occupation of a Mr. Painter.

Image

Again the main Billy elements are in evidence, despite a nineteenth century make-over that has added at least one additional storey to the house accentuating the contrast between this and its little three storey neighbour at no. 9.

No. 9 Duke Street retains almost dolls-house proportions and while the upper façade has clearly been rebuilt, the original cruciform roof appears to survive substantially intact.

Image
the roof of no. 9 from the front

Image
the roof of no. 9 from the rear

Probably using the funds raised by the Darragh mortgage of the two prestigious, four storey, houses on Dawson Street, McEvers developed the remainder of the property constructing four modest houses on the Duke Street frontage between 1725 and 1729. These latter houses were leased by McEvers at an annual rent of between 11 and 16 pounds in a property market suddenly stalled by a combination of over-supply and a series of country wide crop failures. With the balance of advantage shifting to the buyer, William Perry, who leased one of these modest new houses [probably no. 9] from McEvers in Jan 1728, had the temerity to insist in the lease that McEvers ‘put a door to the front cellar of the said house, with a lock and key, and put the pump belonging to the said house in order, as also to clear the said house from all taxes and other encumbrances whatsoever . . . ’
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby cravings » Tue Feb 28, 2012 3:58 pm

In a friend's place recently i saw a photo framed on the wall. took some pics for you guys... don't know cork well, don't know if this place has been discussed here... but anyway...

photo titled "Paddy's Market, Cork, 1904"

sorry about the poor quality photos of a photo...

http://i.imgur.com/n4l9l.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/3I0IZ.jpg

photos too big to embed and i'm too lazy to resize them right now..
cravings
Member
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2009 4:53 pm

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Tue Feb 28, 2012 11:22 pm

That’s a nice photograph there cravings

Image

Cork is a bit of a mystery to the rest of us too, no worries there.

Your ‘Paddy’s Market’ appears to be a colloquial name for Corn Market Street, previously Potato Quay and that interesting house was on the south eastern corner with Paul [Paul's] Street. I’ve outlined the site in red on Rocque’s map of Cork, circa 1760.

Image

The house is gone now and replaced by a three storey structure with a flat roof which I don’t think incorporates any early fabric.

Image

In this aerial view from the 1950s the tall corner house was still there, if apparently held together with steel girders. The house had a double roof structure, but the roof volumes don’t look quite equal and given the comparatively tall floor to ceiling heights, compared to the three-bay Georgian next door [which survives], I’d be more inclined to think of this house as perhaps an early 19th century commercial structure rather than an early 18th century merchant house, but that’s not to say the one may not have evolved out of the other. I've dotted in the line of Paul Street in yellow for orientation, The junction of Patrick Street and Grand Parade is on the right.

Image

An extract from Chearnley’s view of Cork from the north-east shows a good sprinkling of ‘Dutch’ gabled houses in this vicinity in the 1740s. The number key on Chearnley’s view identifies St. Paul’s Church, off Paul Street [no. 11], the old Market House on Corn Market St. [no. 12], and the cupola of the Exchange [no. 13] at the junction of North and South Main Street in the distance beyond, all of which can also be picked out on Rocque.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby cravings » Wed Feb 29, 2012 12:43 pm

interesting, nice one. it just caught my eye.
cravings
Member
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Nov 16, 2009 4:53 pm

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby Paul Clerkin » Mon Mar 05, 2012 5:38 pm

Molesworth Street - early 1970s

Image
User avatar
Paul Clerkin
Old Master
 
Posts: 5427
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 1999 1:00 am
Location: Monaghan

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby StephenC » Mon Mar 05, 2012 7:47 pm

God, just before the wrecker's ball. Terrible shame. Is that a public house on the corner?
User avatar
StephenC
Old Master
 
Posts: 2497
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2001 12:00 am
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby gunter » Tue Mar 06, 2012 2:02 am

Paul Clerkin wrote:Molesworth Street - early 1970s

Image

Brilliant, I've been looking for a really good view of that stretch of Molesworth Street, and yes that was a pub on the corner of South Fredrick Street, which itself was an 1880s rebuilding of the original 1730s structure.

Image

This is the same group captured before the rebuilding of the pub. Originally, the two adjoining 'Georgians' would have matched the 'Billy' design of the corner house.

I have to correct some bad information I gave previously on Lord Rosse's mansion on Molesworth Street, but I'll have to dig out the notes or I'll end up getting the correction wrong too.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby Paul Clerkin » Wed Mar 14, 2012 6:30 pm

The pub was rebuilt around 1876 I believe...

Here's one I don't recall seeing but which is possibly already here

430278_289719607766597_100001856790210_681616_1787219719_n.jpg
User avatar
Paul Clerkin
Old Master
 
Posts: 5427
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 1999 1:00 am
Location: Monaghan

Re: 'Dutch Billys'

Postby Paul Clerkin » Tue Mar 20, 2012 9:37 pm

User avatar
Paul Clerkin
Old Master
 
Posts: 5427
Joined: Wed Mar 03, 1999 1:00 am
Location: Monaghan

PreviousNext

Return to Ireland