Redrawing Dublin

Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Wed Dec 15, 2010 10:48 pm

There have been a few recent initiatives aimed at rethinking or juts plain thinking about Dublin in our new post-Tiger times. The Love The City project is ongoing and I understand it will be completed in March. And a new book by Paul Kearns (a Senior Planner at DCC) and Motti Ruimy entitled Re-Drawing Dublin also raises a range of interesting ideas and theses for the city. Check out details [url]here http://www.architecturefoundation.ie/20 ... t-project/[/url]

To celebrate the launch of Re-Drawing Dublin, a book by Paul Kearns and Motti Ruimy, the IAF are embarking on an exciting NEW web and street project, and we need you to participate!
The book that inspired the audience poll, Re-Drawing Dublin, is about city making. Through the IAF poll and discussion forum, you will have the opportunity to reveal the real truth about how Dublin City is designed and functions from your perspective.
Each week you will be asked one question in our online poll, related to the provocative and engaging themes revealed in the book.
As the finale, the 10 week web project moves onto the streets in March. Sponsored by JC Decaux, metropoles in the city will contain snapshots from the book with the results of the IAF web poll.
The on-street exhibition will challenge policy makers and citizens to confront Dublin’s urban contradictions, to see and tell it as it is, not as it is imagined or believed to be.
Get involved, it is your chance to have a say! Poll starts Tuesday 7th December!
This web and street project is made possible by JC Decaux and the Irish Architecture Foundation.
*** REDRAWING DUBLIN is available from all good bookshops or direct from Gandon editions: www.gandon-editions.com
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby PVC King » Wed Dec 15, 2010 10:53 pm

Sorry to say but what sounds like a reasonable idea has been contaminated by JC Deceaux's involvement;a guessing man would hazard a prediction that the metropoles given will be those blind spots where the angle accentuates the angle to traffic on one side of the road usually a prominent corner i.e. Aungier St opposite DIT; leaving an almost blind angle on the reverse face; just to be clear the promotion will be on the almost blind spot as it is JC Deceaux giving away something with no value....

Shame on DCC for getting screwed over in a barter transaction that stinks; I would have otherwise participated.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby missarchi » Thu Dec 16, 2010 11:46 am

will gandon do archiseek? Irish architecture is lost in modernism there is space for both.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Mon Jan 03, 2011 12:51 pm

I am amazed how much traction this poll on Irish Architecture Foundation got in the media given that only 9 people left comments!

http://www.architecturefoundation.ie/2010/12/14/discussion-would-you-live-in-dublins-inner-city/

Its hardly representative of public opinion but nevertheless Frank McD and some airhead in the Sindo both quoted the findings. Dont get me wrong, plenty of good sentiments put forward, but surely the subject requires a bit more thinking that this. Still I suppose it filled a few column inches (especially the gushy yet doom laden Sindo article).

I'd like to see Redrawing Dublin given a much greater airing in the media...or have we given up on this kind of discussion.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby gunter » Mon Jan 03, 2011 7:44 pm

StephenC wrote:I am amazed how much traction this poll on Irish Architecture Foundation got in the media given that only 9 people left comments!

Nine people is an enormous turn out for an IAF discussion.
StephenC wrote:I'd like to see 'Redrawing Dublin' given a much greater airing in the media...or have we given up on this kind of discussion.

I had a flick through it before Christmas, looks mildly fascinating . . . . to use one of its own phrases.

Was going to wait till it came down in price a bit though.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Sun Jan 09, 2011 3:42 pm

Champions of city living
URBAN PLANNING: It’s Dublin, but not as it’s usually portrayed. A senior city planner and an architect have taken a fresh, provocative look at the city and redefined it in a new book, writes FRANK MCDONALD

WHAT KIND OF city do we want? That’s the fundamental question at the core of Redrawing Dublin , a lively and engaging new book by one of the city council’s senior planners, Paul Kearns, and his partner, Israeli architect Motti Ruimy. It was driven by their “passion for cities” – Dublin, in particular.

The book challenges policy-makers and citizens to confront its contradictions – “to see and tell it as it is, not as it is often believed to be”. Its authors, as Kearns says, have a “huge passion for facts, number-crunching, honesty and reality”. But it’s all presented in a way that aims to get people thinking about the city.

“We’re both coming from opposite sides of the same coin – me as a planner and Motti as an architect – and it wouldn’t have emerged without that creative clash,” Kearns says. Ruimy describes it as “almost like a game, an intellectual exercise, a visual exercise, putting forward the knowledge you have and imagining how it could be.”

The book is provocative, but in a good way. For example, there’s a ward map of the city showing where atheists live – or at least those who responded “no religion” when they filled out the 2006 census form. One out of six residents of the north inner city are “post-God” while more than nine out of 10 in Ballyfermot are “true believers”.

Another fascinating map covers “Sex and the City ” – not a guide to massage parlours, but a ward-by-ward plotting of the number of males and females in each area. Though women and girls outnumber males by 51 to 49 per cent in Dublin generally, men and boys are “on top” in the city centre by a surprising 52 to 48 per cent.

The book is full of such factoids. For example, remarking on the relative absence of green spaces (leaving aside Phoenix Park), its authors calculate that if all of the front and back gardens of suburban Dublin were put together to form a “garden republic”, the overall area would amount to 247 times the area of St Stephen’s Green.

Redrawing Dublin is billed as the story of a city, a celebration of Dublin and the people who live in it. The book is also about “city-making”, design-driven by drawing out ideas and possibilities. Packed with full-colour illustrations, it is both a visual essay and what Kearns and Ruimy describe as a collaborative act of “action urbanism”.

It captures a quirky snapshot of Dublin today and imagines alternative possible futures, such as a more compact city form. But as Kearns says, “beware of what you wish for”. If Dublin, with 4,000 people per square kilometre was to have the same density as, say, Barcelona (16,000 per sq km), we would need “extraordinarily high buildings”.

The authors ask what type of city Dublin really is. For example, where does it begin and end? After the boom, one might say Longford or Gorey. Sure, it has a Georgian core, but the reality is suburban sprawl. They also deal with the difference between the city centre and the inner city and why it is desirable to live in one but not the other.

One of their strong themes is the inherent tension between urban and suburban Dublin. And there’s no prize for guessing which side they’re on. As champions of city living, they delight in exploring Dublin’s urban psyche and identity as well as prodding and probing suburban assumptions and urban prejudices, of which there are many.

It irritates Paul Kearns how few of Dublin’s key decision-makers actually live within the canal ring. “Where people live affects their perceptions of the city and explains many of the problems we have with very small apartments, heavy traffic in the city centre and anti-social behaviour.”

During their research for the book, Kearns and Ruimy interviewed a number of decision-makers, including some from Dublin City Council, asking what would it take to persuade them to live in the inner city? “The responses we got were mildly fascinating. One said simply ‘nothing’ while others shuffled in their seats,” Kearns recalls.

He attributes the “extraordinary energy” of Dublin city architect Ali Grehan to the fact that she lives in Mountjoy Street, in the heart of the north inner city. “She brings that experience to work every day,” he says. Ruimy agrees, and would dearly like to see the conditions created to enable people of all ages to live in the inner city.

Their apartment is on Benburb Street, beside the National Museum at Collins Barracks, from where Ruimy used to set off on 12km runs around Phoenix Park. The only other green spaces in the area are behind the Incorporated Law Society in Blackhall Place, and Bully’s Acre, which is usually padlocked.

Ruimy used to work for Scott Tallon Walker, until he was laid off last March as architectural work dwindled. Now he works for Amos Brandeis in Tel Aviv, where Kearns spends some of his time. Their first public collaboration, in 2002, was a week-long gay art exhibition in the men’s toilets in O’Connell Street before they were concreted over.

Lavishly produced by Gandon Editions, with sponsorship from the Arts Council, the Department of the Environment, Dublin City Council and the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland and some 20 other institutions, companies or individuals, Redrawing Dublin can be picked up at bookshops (€33).
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Sun Jan 09, 2011 3:43 pm

This weekend's Irish Times

Champions of city living
URBAN PLANNING: It’s Dublin, but not as it’s usually portrayed. A senior city planner and an architect have taken a fresh, provocative look at the city and redefined it in a new book, writes FRANK MCDONALD

WHAT KIND OF city do we want? That’s the fundamental question at the core of Redrawing Dublin , a lively and engaging new book by one of the city council’s senior planners, Paul Kearns, and his partner, Israeli architect Motti Ruimy. It was driven by their “passion for cities” – Dublin, in particular.

The book challenges policy-makers and citizens to confront its contradictions – “to see and tell it as it is, not as it is often believed to be”. Its authors, as Kearns says, have a “huge passion for facts, number-crunching, honesty and reality”. But it’s all presented in a way that aims to get people thinking about the city.

“We’re both coming from opposite sides of the same coin – me as a planner and Motti as an architect – and it wouldn’t have emerged without that creative clash,” Kearns says. Ruimy describes it as “almost like a game, an intellectual exercise, a visual exercise, putting forward the knowledge you have and imagining how it could be.”

The book is provocative, but in a good way. For example, there’s a ward map of the city showing where atheists live – or at least those who responded “no religion” when they filled out the 2006 census form. One out of six residents of the north inner city are “post-God” while more than nine out of 10 in Ballyfermot are “true believers”.

Another fascinating map covers “Sex and the City ” – not a guide to massage parlours, but a ward-by-ward plotting of the number of males and females in each area. Though women and girls outnumber males by 51 to 49 per cent in Dublin generally, men and boys are “on top” in the city centre by a surprising 52 to 48 per cent.

The book is full of such factoids. For example, remarking on the relative absence of green spaces (leaving aside Phoenix Park), its authors calculate that if all of the front and back gardens of suburban Dublin were put together to form a “garden republic”, the overall area would amount to 247 times the area of St Stephen’s Green.

Redrawing Dublin is billed as the story of a city, a celebration of Dublin and the people who live in it. The book is also about “city-making”, design-driven by drawing out ideas and possibilities. Packed with full-colour illustrations, it is both a visual essay and what Kearns and Ruimy describe as a collaborative act of “action urbanism”.

It captures a quirky snapshot of Dublin today and imagines alternative possible futures, such as a more compact city form. But as Kearns says, “beware of what you wish for”. If Dublin, with 4,000 people per square kilometre was to have the same density as, say, Barcelona (16,000 per sq km), we would need “extraordinarily high buildings”.

The authors ask what type of city Dublin really is. For example, where does it begin and end? After the boom, one might say Longford or Gorey. Sure, it has a Georgian core, but the reality is suburban sprawl. They also deal with the difference between the city centre and the inner city and why it is desirable to live in one but not the other.

One of their strong themes is the inherent tension between urban and suburban Dublin. And there’s no prize for guessing which side they’re on. As champions of city living, they delight in exploring Dublin’s urban psyche and identity as well as prodding and probing suburban assumptions and urban prejudices, of which there are many.

It irritates Paul Kearns how few of Dublin’s key decision-makers actually live within the canal ring. “Where people live affects their perceptions of the city and explains many of the problems we have with very small apartments, heavy traffic in the city centre and anti-social behaviour.”

During their research for the book, Kearns and Ruimy interviewed a number of decision-makers, including some from Dublin City Council, asking what would it take to persuade them to live in the inner city? “The responses we got were mildly fascinating. One said simply ‘nothing’ while others shuffled in their seats,” Kearns recalls.

He attributes the “extraordinary energy” of Dublin city architect Ali Grehan to the fact that she lives in Mountjoy Street, in the heart of the north inner city. “She brings that experience to work every day,” he says. Ruimy agrees, and would dearly like to see the conditions created to enable people of all ages to live in the inner city.

Their apartment is on Benburb Street, beside the National Museum at Collins Barracks, from where Ruimy used to set off on 12km runs around Phoenix Park. The only other green spaces in the area are behind the Incorporated Law Society in Blackhall Place, and Bully’s Acre, which is usually padlocked.

Ruimy used to work for Scott Tallon Walker, until he was laid off last March as architectural work dwindled. Now he works for Amos Brandeis in Tel Aviv, where Kearns spends some of his time. Their first public collaboration, in 2002, was a week-long gay art exhibition in the men’s toilets in O’Connell Street before they were concreted over.

Lavishly produced by Gandon Editions, with sponsorship from the Arts Council, the Department of the Environment, Dublin City Council and the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland and some 20 other institutions, companies or individuals, Redrawing Dublin can be picked up at bookshops (€33).
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby onq » Sun Jan 09, 2011 4:12 pm

It irritates Paul Kearns how few of Dublin’s key decision-makers actually live within the canal ring. “Where people live affects their perceptions of the city and explains many of the problems we have with very small apartments, heavy traffic in the city centre and anti-social behaviour.”

Oh really - perish the thought that Dublin might be designed by the majority, intead of the minority of middle class born again city dwellers that masquerade as Greens half the time, while slapping themselves on their backs at every award ceremony.

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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Sun Jan 09, 2011 4:59 pm

Hmmm grumpy again I see ONQ
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby onq » Sun Jan 09, 2011 5:21 pm

StephenC wrote:Hmmm grumpy again I see ONQ


(chuckle)

I thought I was being restrained.

At least I didn't slag off Frank for hugely promoting a relatively nondescript book by two gay guys...

Or indeed you, for posting the article twice - I know what fun can be had with trying to edit a post here only to see it multiply.

Come to think of it, why is there a seagull on your head?

Is it a metaphor for some flight of fancy you've had?

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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Sun Jan 09, 2011 5:35 pm

why is their sexuality an issue for you ONQ?
and why shouldnt Frank McD discuss the book. There's quite a lot worth saying in it. Why not discuss it.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Sun Jan 09, 2011 5:39 pm

onq wrote:
Oh really - perish the thought that Dublin might be designed by the majority, intead of the minority of middle class born again city dwellers that masquerade as Greens half the time, while slapping themselves on their backs at every award ceremony.



Also what exactly does this mean? Who are the "majority" and "minority" you talk of? Given that not everyone in the city is an trained and active architect or planner, or landscaper or developer or whatever, it seems logical to me that a "minority" is responsible for determining the design of the city.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby gunter » Sun Jan 23, 2011 3:37 pm

OK, if the book is sold out, that means somebody out there must have bought it.

So why are we not getting a line-by-line breakdown of what's in it?

Come on, get the lead out, it's not like anyone has any work on at the moment.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby missarchi » Mon Jan 24, 2011 9:47 am

Are there any drawings?
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby BTH » Fri Jan 28, 2011 1:48 pm

I'd also like to know what exactly the sexuality of the authors has to do with this particular debate?
You often talk a lot of sense ONQ but some of your more reactionary and controversial statements can dilute the points you make...
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby onq » Fri Jan 28, 2011 4:19 pm

StephenC wrote:why is their sexuality an issue for you ONQ?
and why shouldnt Frank McD discuss the book. There's quite a lot worth saying in it. Why not discuss it.


Its useful to throw in a politically incorrect comment to see the moral mary side of the other posters.

But perhaps you were missing the point.

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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby onq » Fri Jan 28, 2011 4:20 pm

BTH wrote:I'd also like to know what exactly the sexuality of the authors has to do with this particular debate?
You often talk a lot of sense ONQ but some of your more reactionary and controversial statements can dilute the points you make...


Priceless to see so many people getting precious about their sexuality.

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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby onq » Fri Jan 28, 2011 4:21 pm

StephenC wrote:
onq wrote:
Oh really - perish the thought that Dublin might be designed by the majority, intead of the minority of middle class born again city dwellers that masquerade as Greens half the time, while slapping themselves on their backs at every award ceremony.



Also what exactly does this mean? Who are the "majority" and "minority" you talk of? Given that not everyone in the city is an trained and active architect or planner, or landscaper or developer or whatever, it seems logical to me that a "minority" is responsible for determining the design of the city.


It seems logical that a minority designs for the majority does it?

Without consultation?

Your politically correct toga is slipping...

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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby BTH » Fri Jan 28, 2011 6:44 pm

onq wrote:
StephenC wrote:why is their sexuality an issue for you ONQ?
and why shouldnt Frank McD discuss the book. There's quite a lot worth saying in it. Why not discuss it.


Its useful to throw in a politically incorrect comment to see the moral mary side of the other posters.

But perhaps you were missing the point.

ONQ.


So you're admitting that you're being obnoxious for the sake of it? Very mature. As for getting precious, I believe it is you that brought the question of sexuality into play, clearly implying that being Gay somehow makes someones work less worthy of discussion or respect. If that's not what you meant then why did you mention it? Oh that's right - you were just being obnoxious.
Oh and don't bother with another snide response. We all know that you always need to have the last word.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby gunter » Fri Jan 28, 2011 6:52 pm

I don't want to go off-topic here . . . . . . but has anyone read the actual book?
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby gunter » Wed Mar 09, 2011 1:35 pm

Notice of a potentially interesting event this evening in 'The Complex', Smithfield, I haven't got a time, maybe somebody knows?
Let's hope there's not a clash now with the inaugural meeting of the Smithfield Bloodbath Survivors Group, who are apparently resisting all attempts at relocation to The Bleeding Horse.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

The URBAN PARTY has invited diverse and acclaimed ‘Dublin Voices’ to speak for just 3 minutes each on their vision for our city, giving you fast moving and rotating urban perspectives on the future of Dublin.

At a challenging time for our City and Country, the Urban Party provides a political soapbox to lobby our new government on the way forward for Dublin.

THE VOICES

Ivana Bacik - Senator
Dylan Haskins - Social Entrepreneur
Alan Mee - Urban Agenda
Vanessa Fielding - The Complex
Theatre Machine
Kieran Rose - Planner
Maxim Laroussi - Architecture Republic
Gerry Godley - Musician
Elaine Byrne - Journalist
Jay Bourke - Entrepreneur
Michael McDermot - Le Cool Dublin
Dick Gleeson - City Planner
Leanne Caulfied - Second Level Student's Union
Garrett Pitcher - Indigo & Cloth
Paul Keogh - RIAI
Aaron Copeland - Upstart
Mick Wilson - Gradcam
Sandra O Connell - Editor
Dermot Lacey - Councillor
Ali Grehan - City Architect
Constantin Gurdgiev - Economist

We hope you can join us


http://www.architecturefoundation.ie
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Wed Mar 09, 2011 2:26 pm

The Party starts at 6.30pm
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby gunter » Thu Mar 10, 2011 1:19 am

A decent turn out for Urban Party tonight, who’d have thought free beer would pull people in off the streets on a damp Wednesday night?

The ridiculously early start made me to miss the first half dozen speakers, including stalwarts of these occasions such as Alan Mee and Ivana Bacik [the latter being saved from the potential embarrassment of not getting a seat by the clever device of a standing only format]. I apparently also missed Kieran Rose, but it didn’t matter on this occasion as it seems that he had agreed in advance to swap scripts with RIAI’s Paul Keogh, who appeared further down the bill.

A character from ‘Le Cool Dublin’ which I imagine is something I’m too old to be interested in, delivered a long wish list for the city, which included some eminently sensible ideas like allowing bikes on the Luas and having more Tesco stores. Young radicalism but with convenience, I like that.

Dick Gleeson felt the need to declare at the outset that he loved his job as chief city planner, as if anyone wouldn’t love to have a decent job in the current climate, but he seemed slightly uncomfortable and unsure in his delivery of the view from high officialdom. Dick took the opportunity of his three minute Urban Party presentation to announce some new Dublin Regional Ten Point Plan Thing [possibly including headings such as ‘Food’ and ‘Water’] and you began to sense what it must be like to stand in a Arab square right now and listen to an swarthy embattled potentate promise cash payouts if people would just disperse quietly and go back into negative equity and leave him alone to govern in peace.

Garrett Pitcher [a new name to me] observed that the city is shrinking [apparently to an area around Grafton Street] which will be news to people living in new housing estates out the backside of Swords, but his other observation; that ‘empty premises are killing the city’ did strike a cord with the audience.

Elaine Byrne came on stage in a pink woolly hat and for a moment I prepped to hear from the basket weaving end of the cultural spectrum, but in fairness, Byrne’s theme was the acutely observed fact that Dublin lacks the definitive centre that all decent cities [‘and even tribal villages in Ghana’] have and it’s time to take an axe to the trees in Foster Place and forge a proper city centre out of College Green. Now we’re getting somewhere.

Paul Keogh strolled on next and went on about the false gods of height and density [ - he of the plan to build the tallest residential tower in Dublin - ] but otherwise read from the Kieran Rose book of inter-city competition for bright young things and advancement through diversity, innovation and vibrancy etc. etc. all harmless notions in their own right until someone attaches them to some gawd-awful office park cluster on steroids where a bit urban repair was called for. Keogh did conclude with the declaration that ‘Dublin is more than Guinness and Craic’, which is worth saying.

Ken McHugh stepped up next, welcomed everyone to his patch, had a go at the City Council, listed half a dozen broken promises and presumably then went outside to piss on all the lamp posts.

Where others had struggled with the time constraints, Sandra O’Connell brought a bit of Teutonic efficiency to proceedings with a word count timed to finish a fraction ahead of the hooter. Sandra had plumped for a poetic theme and her presentation was meticulously cross referenced and brightly embellished with poetic quotations. If there is a compelling case for a directly elected city poet, this was it.

Moving swiftly on, the next speaker was Aaron Copeland of ‘Upstart’. These people are artistic provocateurs with other designs on our lamp posts. I fear a showdown with Ken may be in the offing.

So far, so good, and we began to sense that we might get out of there without a repeat of the recent Smithfield bloodbath, but at that point Cllr. Dermot Lacy strode on stage. Lacy is a man who was born in full election mode and nothing on this earth is going to come between him and the position of directly elected mayor, ‘read the odds on Paddy Power’ he nodded knowingly [there goes another seat Ivana Bacik isn’t going to get]. Wielding a verbal slash hook, Lacy hit the ground running with swipes aimed at Dick Gleeson, the city manager, the Dept. of the Environment and RTE in rapid succession. Luckily the hooter went before the crowd – now booze fuelled and whipped into a frenzy – could break out the burning torches and charge out into the streets to wreak righteous vengeance.

But the format is the format, so this demagogic outburst was all over in three minutes and then we had the task of adjusting to the slight figure of Ali [the city architect]. Ali’s message was design, design and more design and to keep on-message Ali was sporting a neat, contour hugging, designer outfit with a shiny black belt which I personally found too distracting to take any further notes. I heard something about a ‘big document that’s gone to the printers’ and there was talk of 2014 and going it alone on Design Capital status, which is probably something to do with the anniversary of the battle of Clontarf and sticking one in the eye of Scandinavia.

The evening finished up with Constantin Gurdgiev, fully endorsing Dermot Lacy’s tirade and reminding people that great cities tended to be the product of despotic regimes, which is another reason to believe that we may have been short changed . . . . . as well as being robbed blind and landed in debt for the rest of our lives.

Good stuff, by and large, we need to do this more often.
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby missarchi » Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:14 am

thanks for the update...
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Re: Redrawing Dublin

Postby StephenC » Thu Mar 10, 2011 11:56 am

Yes, it was a very stimulating evening and loads of really good ideas came out. I personally liked Kieran Rose's suggestion of a new city library as a centre of learning in the city; I liked that the (lack of a ) City Museum surfaced a couple of times; loved the City Poet idea; and thought Elaine Byrne made a great case for College Green.

One of the shocks of the night is that The Complex is to be turfed out for a Tesco Metro which Vanessa Felding rightly pointed out will close down Fresh and will actually remove life from the square. She has the perfect audience to make her case to including the Senior Planner for the area (who also wrote the book), the senior planner in charge of economic development (who waxed lyrical about culture in the city), the City Planner (who disappointed with an abstract and uninspiring 3 mins) and the City Architect (who should be wondering why this great space juts isn't a hive of life!). Hopefully, saner heads prevail.

Last but not least, Paul Kearns and Motti Ruimy should be congratulated for the boom and the energy behind the event and the online survey. Its great to see such thinkin's. What a shame they didn't say anything about the book though!
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