Irish Sporting Heritage

Irish Sporting Heritage

Postby ISH » Thu Aug 05, 2010 3:02 pm

Boston College-Ireland has just launched the Irish Sporting Heritage Database which aims to provide an inventory of Ireland's built sporting heritage over the past 150 years. If you have any information about sporting architecture in Ireland we would be very happy to hear from you. It is proving very difficult to trace information on architects and builders of sites. If you can think of any site that has an interesting history or conveys an important social or cultural story contact us. Further details are on our website: www.irishsportingheritage.com

Is there an identifiable vernacular style in Ireland's sporting architecture?
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Re: Irish Sporting Heritage

Postby Tayto » Thu Aug 05, 2010 3:20 pm

ISH wrote:.....Is there an identifiable vernacular style in Ireland's sporting architecture?


Well in my time, the traditional football Dressing Room facilities were heavily inspired by freight container design.::o
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Re: Irish Sporting Heritage

Postby gunter » Fri Aug 06, 2010 10:29 am

Most Irish football grounds, of any code, were formed of earth embankments cast with rough concrete terraces, and stand roofs were usually just versions of agricultural structures, there wouldn't have been much design input I imagine. I think the corrugated shelter at one end of Richmond Park [ - The Stadium of Light - ] is still called 'The Shed'.

Handball alleys would have been every bit as undesigned, but more interesting from a scale and often a streetscape point of view.

I recall a great little cartoon in L'équipe around the time that Ireland beat France 1 - nill [with a Liam Brady goal] in a world cup qualifier [when they had the likes of Platini and Rocheteau etc.], depicting the French rugby coach [some pocket-sized Nepoleonic type] who had just master minded beating us in rugby - again - a week or so later at the same venue. The rugby coach is shown taking the soccer coach by the hand and bringing him down to Lansdowne Road with the caption 'I'll show you how it's done' - or something similar in French. Lansdowne Road was rather accurately depicted as a miserable little recangular arena with two unequal shed roofs facing each other. This would have been at the time that France had developed the new Parc des Princes stadium, predecessor to the even more magnificent Stad Francais.

p.s. the cartoon must have been reprinted in the Irish Times, one doesn't buy L'équipe after a large French win.
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Re: Irish Sporting Heritage

Postby tommyt » Fri Aug 06, 2010 11:10 am

There is plenty online regarding the history of Dalymount park. The Bohemian Footbal Club's historian Stephen Burke could easily point you in the direction of other sources of historic data regarding the home of Irish Football if you wish to follow through.

The terracing of Dalymount Park was designed in the 1940s/50s by Archibald Leitch - the preeminent stadium architect in Britain at the time. Whilst tragically the Stadium is falling down on itself these days, the Connaught St terrace still has one of the finest sightlines I've ever come across from which to watch a game.

I recall a college lecturer back in the day reeling out regularly the old quip that along with the Round Tower, the Handball Alley is one of our only unique contributions to world architecture..
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Re: Irish Sporting Heritage

Postby trace » Fri Aug 06, 2010 4:22 pm

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Re: Irish Sporting Heritage

Postby tommyt » Fri Aug 06, 2010 4:47 pm

trace wrote:Crackin' site this! http://irishhandballalley.blogspot.com/


Cracking site indeed. Cheers for the link. Surprised the Dublin section misses out on the alley in Grangegorman.
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