Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby Country Boy » Tue Jun 01, 2010 8:38 pm

Just in the process of buying a bungalow despite my aversion to the design. The package is good mainly 6 acres of land and on a nice quiet country road!

As far as bungalows go its not the worst I've seen but it lacks something - probably many things....Built 5 years ago - red brick but usual long dark coridor etc.

I want to expand upstairs and use the space probably for 2 large rooms and also a nice sun room on the west end just off the side of the kitchen to catch the evening sun....

Is it worth employing an architect? I don't want to do major surgery as it is all fairly new and also money is an issue....

I am based in Louth - and will be looking for someone to do just the design, drawings and planning work.

Any ideas...

http://picasaweb.google.com/simonconroy100/HousePicts#5477892725634387778

Ta
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby goneill » Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:46 am

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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby Paul Clerkin » Wed Jun 02, 2010 12:46 pm

Always figured the quickest way to brighten up a bungalow was to remove the first room where the hall doglegs - opening up the entire space
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby Mike Kavanagh » Wed Jun 02, 2010 1:39 pm

Ideas?
Nip down to the butcher and ask for free meat!
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby Bob Dole » Wed Jun 02, 2010 1:50 pm

If you are planning on doing something -make sure you work out a budget very early on, see (via architect) what you can get for it. Otherwise you might get great proposals, then find out it will cost a fortune to actually implement it.
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby publicrealm » Wed Jun 02, 2010 3:22 pm

Country Boy wrote:
Is it worth employing an architect? I don't want to do major surgery as it is all fairly new and also money is an issue....


[


Country Boy,

I would strongly recommend an architect - a decent one will actually save you money - not cost you money, will ensure the work is properly done and will make the most of your home.

I'm a planner - so have no axe to grind - just speaking from long experience.
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby PVC King » Wed Jun 02, 2010 4:35 pm

I agree and would say that the major issue will be getting more light in; no other group than architects understand light better. I'd also agree with what Paul Clerkin said above in relation to the dogleg that seems to come as standard with bungalows; if you had one objective in isolation it would to my mind be to bring the entrance space into the main living space with the most light possible.

I'd ask for a fee basis in 2 parts; part 1 design fee and part 2 supervising the works; financially I suspect you could do very well on this if you can hold for 5 years plus and acheive a good design executed by a reasonably priced contractor.
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby Tayto » Wed Jun 02, 2010 7:43 pm

Country Boy wrote:Is it worth employing an architect? I don't want to do major surgery as it is all fairly new and also money is an issue....

I am based in Louth - and will be looking for someone to do just the design, drawings and planning work.

Any ideas...


What you want to do now is to get yourself a good Engineer. Don't be getting yourself involved with them architects and their fancy notions. Or get yourself one of those technician lads down the road there who'll lash out an 'ol drawin' for ye for the price of a pint. Sure all it takes is a few 'ol drawins' and maybe a few forms to fill and then Bob's yer uncle. Anyways, with all the computers they have nowadays all it takes is to push a few buttons and there's the job done. And if money's an issue, well you don't have to pay them anything either. Sure haven't they enough as it is? I certainly wouldn't spend more than a tenner anyway.
Good Luck!
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby KerryBog2 » Wed Jun 02, 2010 9:46 pm

Country Boy wrote:Just in the process of buying a bungalow despite my aversion to the design. The package is good mainly 6 acres of land and on a nice quiet country road!

As far as bungalows go its not the worst I've seen but it lacks something - probably many things....Built 5 years ago - red brick but usual long dark coridor etc.

I want to expand upstairs and use the space probably for 2 large rooms and also a nice sun room on the west end just off the side of the kitchen to catch the evening sun....

Is it worth employing an architect? I don't want to do major surgery as it is all fairly new and also money is an issue....

I am based in Louth - and will be looking for someone to do just the design, drawings and planning work.

Any ideas...

http://picasaweb.google.com/simonconroy100/HousePicts#5477892725634387778

Ta

Why bother to buy it? It has serious drawbacks as you would admit to yourself if honest. The windows are totally crap, there is no site landscaping, the internal design is faulty, the external aspects have no redeeming features.... it is just a big site, with a readymade problem sitting on it that has a couple of pluses , one of which is planning. Don't bother to but it, buy a site, talk to an architect and build what you want. Why try to do a bodge job on something that never will be right?
Now is the time to build, prices are low, and an architect will do a deal......
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby PVC King » Thu Jun 03, 2010 7:14 am

KB you could be right but then again there may be a special situation in the form of a distressed seller who is selling for a lot less than it cost to build either to trade up or simply repay the bank and migrate either elsewhere in Ireland or further away. If the price is close to what it would cost to build plus say up to €25,000 for the site which carries built planning consent; then I'd take your view as a credible option. The downsides of commencing a new project could be

1. Planning risks which if you aren't a true country lad may be elevated

2. Construction cost over-runs (lets be honest firms may start to wind up vs taking jobs below cost to keep work at any price coming in)

3. A bank removing finance mid way through the project or the cost of money rising still further

On a more academic level; I find this interesting as there are hundreds of thousands of bungalows straight from a plan book which were not great day and will age terribly; a bit like 1960's office buildings many of these will be retro-fitted as time goes on. As Tayto said there may be some merit in going to de pub and meetin de lads but more for getting an indicative construction rate per square foot than an auwl enginear
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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby onq » Thu Jun 03, 2010 10:43 am

Country Boy wrote:Just in the process of buying a bungalow despite my aversion to the design. The package is good mainly 6 acres of land and on a nice quiet country road!

As far as bungalows go its not the worst I've seen but it lacks something - probably many things....Built 5 years ago - red brick but usual long dark coridor etc.

I want to expand upstairs and use the space probably for 2 large rooms and also a nice sun room on the west end just off the side of the kitchen to catch the evening sun....

Is it worth employing an architect? I don't want to do major surgery as it is all fairly new and also money is an issue....

I am based in Louth - and will be looking for someone to do just the design, drawings and planning work.

Any ideas...

http://picasaweb.google.com/simonconroy100/HousePicts#5477892725634387778

Ta


The pictures don't give a full impression of the house.

For that you'd need at least a plan and a section, with some square-on pictures of the elevations or else elevational drawings.

While the building looks competently built the window to wall ratio seems low and those bay windows will not let admit much light to the rooms they serve.

The brick and presumably recon stone quoins suggest a cavity wall construction, which should be opened up in a few places to assess the level of insulation as well as the security of its "fixing" against the inner leaf.

This will allow a competent BER assessor issue a comment in relation to its level of heat retention.

My own concern in terms of design is that in a rural area the fussy bay windows, the small windows overall, the lakc of a sun room, and possibly low attic height internally after upscaling the joists and insulating following the line of the roof will all conspire to give you something that may not sell well later on.

Enlarging windows needs to be carefully considered as does whether or not you are going to work within the traditional idiom of the dwelling as it stands, try to tack on a modernist "extension" or totally reinvent the building - that's a basic design decisison that will affect everything else.

There is a lot do to with this house - raising window heads and windowns to admit more light and take advantage of the aspect of the house towards views and the sun path will not be cheap and from the design it looks as though this has not been done.

In addition to Paul Clerkin's suggestion there is one other method of giving "space" to a small dwelling.

Consider revising the roof structure over the kichen/living/dining ot make this space storey-and-a-half height. It may be possible to open up the whole area if this is currently boxed off in a room/room/room arrangement.

This alone will "modernise" the mode of living that the house can support, since many houses in Dublin in the boom got the "sun room" treatment for just this purpose.

Also in place of Paul's "room removal" a modified approach might be to replace a bedroom with a smaller wheelchair accessible compliant WC - this will still add space to a hall while allowing the existing WC to be "turned" to form an En Suite.

All of this depends on your specific needs, but at this stage - before anything else is done to the property - talk to the planners!

I am suspicious about the level of finish and the detailing.

This may have been required in the eyes of the LA to improve the visual amenity of the dwelling to faciliate the granting of permission in this area.

Also area-related, you may find that there is a restrictive condition in the permission which requires the house to be occupied by the applicant/relative of the original land-owner for ten years from the date of completion [or whatever].

Such permission conditions are well-known in country areas and you need to satisfy yourself of this possible burden via the Permission as well as any other burdens on the lease from rights of way, ground conditions and local flood conditions, potential for landslips due to recent Wind Turbine installations, etc.

Ans make sure they owners take that big Alsatian with them when they leave... :)

HTH

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Re: Can a bunglow be redeemed?

Postby Country Boy » Mon Jun 14, 2010 10:58 pm

Thanks for all the replies... some very interesting points..

I am a town boy so can't get permission to build as most areas are restricted... Otherwise I would prefer to get a good architect and build a decent home on a nice country site...

This for me is a compromise solution and it will never be the taj mahal but I'm hoping to be able to transform it or even 'tack on' at least one well designed section...

I have decided to consult an architect to see what s/he thinks.. will keep you posted :)
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