Anglo Irish Bank and landbanking

Re: Anglo Irish Bank and landbanking

Postby cgcsb » Mon May 17, 2010 7:50 pm

rumour has it that construction has recommenced on the site of Anglo's proposed new HQ. Anyone know about it?
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Re: Anglo Irish Bank and landbanking

Postby sash » Tue May 18, 2010 11:00 am

I know that the companies who still had gear in the building - shuttering, props etc - were clearing them out the last few weeks. Don't think construction is recommencing though.
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Re: Anglo Irish Bank and landbanking

Postby KerryBog2 » Mon May 24, 2010 2:59 pm

Some interesting old posts there!:eek:

FWIW, I heard that de nordside location was picked as Drumm & many other senior execs did not want to commute across de river..
My suggestion for a bad bank did not happen, and DOC has left. Hmmmmmmmmm.
PVC - re-reading your posts is hilarious.:D:D:D:D
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Re: Anglo Irish Bank and landbanking

Postby PVC King » Mon May 24, 2010 3:10 pm

KerryBog2 wrote:Some interesting old posts there!:eek:

FWIW, I heard that de nordside location was picked as Drumm & many other senior execs did not want to commute across de river..
My suggestion for a bad bank did not happen, and DOC has left. Hmmmmmmmmm.
PVC - re-reading your posts is hilarious.:D:D:D:D
Kb2



The level of concealment from the market was a first in an Irish context; I got it wrong but then again so did most others as like an Iceberg you could only see the top 10%. I did however call the UK right which is a market that has behaved more in line with the US and Asia and I expect to see the Quinlan assets deliver serious profits as they are disposed of to commodity originated wealth.

At least the International sector has held up; if it didn't or it doesn't you would have very serious problems.
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Re: Anglo Irish Bank and landbanking

Postby missarchi » Mon May 24, 2010 10:42 pm

PVC King wrote:At least the International sector has held up; if it didn't or it doesn't you would have very serious problems.


interest on interest? Why hasn't the UK giving up its right to print money or adopted the euro?
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Re: Anglo Irish Bank and landbanking

Postby missarchi » Wed May 26, 2010 4:57 am

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Re: Anglo Irish Bank and landbanking

Postby PVC King » Wed May 26, 2010 8:01 am

PARIS (Dow Jones)--European governments are right to intensify their efforts to cut borrowing, and there is little risk they will cause a double-dip recession, said the chief economist of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

"Countries are taking stronger measures than one might have expected a few weeks or months ago. The timing isn't changing, but the intensity of the measures is, which is appropriate because the fiscal consolidation challenges are large," Pier Carlo Padoan told Dow Jones Newswires in a telephone interview before the release of the think tank's twice yearly Economic Outlook Wednesday.

Recent austerity measures announced by Spain and Portugal to counter concerns over their ability to pay debts have heightened worries about the strength of economic growth in the euro zone.

Spanish Finance Minister Elena Salgado said openly last week that governments should continue to cut their budget deficits, even if that results in slower growth.

"We do not think our forecasts for growth will be dramatically changed, even taking into account new measures and therefore we do not see the risk of a double dip, certainly not a double dip coming out as a consequence of fiscal consolidation," Padoan said Tuesday.

Padoan also said the weakening of the euro that has accompanied concerns over growth and government debt burdens in Europe takes the currency in the right direction.

"The fact that the euro is weakening goes in the right direction because the euro was possibly overvalued for some time in the past," Padoan said.

He added that major currencies often move in wide swings, so the recent large fall in the euro against the dollar isn't surprising.


If we redeployed you and that fantasist Morgan Kelly to Moneypoint there would be a dramatic fall in hot air fired power generation costs; great for the deficit reduction measures.
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