Government wants to repossess landmark College Green bank

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby notjim » Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:14 am

@Global Citizen: remains open as what? Banking is the established historic use, it remains a fine bank and, as I said, the way the BoI maintains a slightly pompous and ceremonial atmosphere in the main banking hall is one of the things that does them credit. Why fall in with this silly and senseless populism?

Exhibition center: ha, what is all this stuff that is crying out to be exhibited. What is this perceived lack of fine historic buildings ready for re-use. Look around!

Cap salaries, make bankers sit in stocks in College Green, put people in prison, whatever, just don't mess up one of the few examples of an historic building being well maintained in a public and historically established use.
notjim
 
Posts: 1708
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2001 1:00 am
Location: Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby PVC King » Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:23 am

The venue clearly is not large enough for important national events such as a Bill O visit or a once in a generation decent soccer team return but has its uses for more niche events. The BoI has always been very good at supporting the arts in providing the interior of the space etc. Also to say that BoI is nationalised is somewhat untrue; the National Pensions Reserve Fund was in a position to buy preference shares yielding a mammoth dividend at a very low price; these if held will when the bank raises capital through disposals and a rights issue be worth considerably more than was paid for them. The UK Government is now in profit on RBS and Lloyds but Northern Rock like INBS and Anglo are unfortunately case studies that every finance student will be examined on hopefully for generations to come as an important lesson well learned.

All that can be expected of BoI is that they enter the 21st century on City Centre car-parking i.e. close the one at their College Green branch and turn the space into a public venue for suitable events and continue to manage the building in the sensitive manner that they have to date other than the rushed wheelchair access application which had as much forward thinking planning as the Anglo balance sheet.
PVC King
 

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby gunter » Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:34 am

Continued use as a bank is a safe option, but conversion into a proper city museum certainly has merit.

There has long been vague talk of building a 'museum of the city', with sites such as that useless patch of grass on Winetavern Street [which currently affords a panoramic view of the Civic Office bunkers] being a particularly good option, if only the country wasn't broke.

In the circumstances, the old Parliament House wouldn't be a bad option. As well as it's own inherent architectural and historical attributes, the building has numerous little wasted areas and courtyards that aerial views suggest are either totally unused or are in use just as surface car parks, these could make stunning exhibition spaces [if glazed over] which in conjunction with the existing historic interiors might make a world class museum.

As PVC said, getting the car parking out of the forecourt would be a positive, either way, as would having the whole building open 7 days.

I certainly can't see the building ever returning to parliament house use.
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1925
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby PVC King » Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:48 am

I do not dispute that it would make a great museum; it is after all the original parlimentary experience the Country had. My concern for this building is one that I share with the GPO; there is a large banking hall that is ideal for a museum but what do you do with the warren of offices and vaults that makes up the rest of the building excluding the College Street facing entrance hall which is by a distance my favourate entrance hall in Dublin. I think it is an issue that could benefit from some operational research when the public finance or IFI funding positions merit it. i.e. potentially have BoI grant a long license to either the state or a charitable foundation for designated parts of the building; my guess is that they would be loathe to as the building is one of the rare examples of a building of European heritage importance that has commercial consent; which makes this particular worth a significant sum which they are unlikely to want to see evaporate in the absence of full value being paid; from an operational position I have no doubt that the rental value of the banking hall and offices would not come close to the annual maintenance and additional heating/cooling costs that come with such grand proportions and age. We need another era of Farmleigh style government finances to get triffling matters such as money out of the way!!!
PVC King
 

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby reddy » Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:43 am

PVC King wrote: the rushed wheelchair access application which had as much forward thinking planning as the Anglo balance sheet.


ha ha! Brilliant. :D
reddy
Member
 
Posts: 313
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 11:03 am
Location: Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby GrahamH » Wed Apr 21, 2010 10:12 pm

notjim wrote:@Global Citizen: remains open as what? Banking is the established historic use, it remains a fine bank and, as I said, the way the BoI maintains a slightly pompous and ceremonial atmosphere in the main banking hall is one of the things that does them credit. Why fall in with this silly and senseless populism?

Exhibition center: ha, what is all this stuff that is crying out to be exhibited. What is this perceived lack of fine historic buildings ready for re-use. Look around!

Cap salaries, make bankers sit in stocks in College Green, put people in prison, whatever, just don't mess up one of the few examples of an historic building being well maintained in a public and historically established use.


Snap!

The essential character of the Bank of Ireland (note, Bank of Ireland, not 'former Parliament House' – it has been the former for more than double the time of the latter) as it stands today is one of prestige and stately public declaration. This is not just a result of the remarkable grandeur of the building’s design, the genius of its detailing, or its obvious venerability. For this character is also, indeed if not largely, derived from its function as a ceremonial (if no longer operational) headquarters. This is significant.

It is wrong to suggest, as is often stated, that the Bank of Ireland has no claim over this former public building as reinvented as a financial centre. Yes, the ideal use for it following the Union, as much as to ease the pain as to avoid further embellishment of the whole tawdry spectacle, would have been as a public gallery, as it temporarily became immediately post-1801. Nonetheless, the Bank’s decision to acquire the building as its headquarters lent considerable prestige and a vote of confidence to the city’s most important architectural work - what could have become a neglected embarrassment in the heart of the city. Bearing in mind that the Bank had its own plans for a magnificent headquarters, to be built to the designs of John Soane in a location and style that would make it the most prominent public building in the capital, it is not unreasonable to suggest that the former Parliament House as much reflected the Bank’s own sense of itself and its architectural pretensions, as it proved a convenient and economical solution to its headquarters dilemma in rapidly changing times. The Bank's further commitment to the site over the following two centuries, including the substantial and highly accomplished adaptions carried out directly for it, further emphasises the institution’s inherent connection to the site as it stands today.

Therefore the Bank of Ireland on College Green in its current incarnation exhibits significant meaning and legibility, as the building’s design directly correlates to its use as a ceremonial headquarters: it is precisely what its occupant wants it to be. By contrast, its conversion to an exhibition space dilutes this prestige – in fact it arguably turns it on its head, as it then becomes about finding an arbitary use for yet another grand old building, rather than the building dictating a use that is commensurate to its status in the city. In many ways, this is why converted former public buildings in other European cities often fail to impart that spark of prestige they once bestowed on the visitor or passer-by. They just become another Acme mothballed grand shell, given the tokenistic treatment of restoration and ‘readable and reversible intervention’ to accommodate the masses clambering over their great steps, fingering their columns and wandering aimlessly about their great halls. Critically in all of this, they become objects for those least interested and least connected to their local value – the tourist - while the citizen for whom the building was once built gets pushed to the sidelines. In effect, what is being proposed for Dublin’s two flagship public buildings – the General Post Office and the Bank of Ireland – is to take them out of the hands of the citizenry, for whom they were built and for whom they provide essential services, and put into the hands of the marketeers of Fáilte Ireland and troops of intensely apathetic Spanish teenagers. As a rule of thumb, the Bank of Ireland should remain as is unless for operational reasons it becomes no longer relevant or viable, or a suitable alternative use ties in with the bank reassessing its options.

There is one solitary alternative use, and one use only, that comes in any way close to appropriately interpreting the intensely tangled collection of baggage that comes with the Bank of Ireland, and that is, as suggested, a City of Dublin Museum. The story of the capital that brought the building into being – there are few better compliments.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4592
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby Global Citizen » Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:33 pm

notjim wrote:@Global Citizen: remains open as what? Banking is the established historic use, it remains a fine bank and, as I said, the way the BoI maintains a slightly pompous and ceremonial atmosphere in the main banking hall is one of the things that does them credit. Why fall in with this silly and senseless populism?

Exhibition center: ha, what is all this stuff that is crying out to be exhibited. What is this perceived lack of fine historic buildings ready for re-use. Look around!

Cap salaries, make bankers sit in stocks in College Green, put people in prison, whatever, just don't mess up one of the few examples of an historic building being well maintained in a public and historically established use.


Nowhere in my post did I mention exhibition centres or a hint at returning the bank to the state as a means of getting some form of vengeance over its current custodians.

I would simply like to see it become more accessable so that it may be appreciated in greater numbers. Of course the dignity of the building must be maintained to accommodate this. The suggestion that it could be used to house a City of Dublin Museum has the most merit as the building itself played a large part in the history of the city and country as a whole.

The fact that the building remains a bank is in my opinion, the very reason why it is overlooked by so many. People simply see it as another branch of BOI and therefore pass it by as they have no business going in there unless they have a transaction to make.

True, it has been home to the bank for a lot longer than than those it was built to house and the Bank of Ireland have been worthy residents. But it was (is) the first purpose built parliament building in the world and I believe it deserves greater celebration.
Its a shame that thousands walk past it 7 days a week and never see inside the door.
Global Citizen
Member
 
Posts: 197
Joined: Tue Dec 02, 2008 3:23 am
Location: Global

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby lauder » Wed Apr 21, 2010 11:46 pm

I see its current use as the only economically viable use. The government could not afford to maintain it as a public museum, especially considering the abundance of museums nearby.

As someone who regularly walks though the building for pleasure, rather than business I think it is a sincere pity that the bank has closed the House of Lords entrance, further dulling Westmoreland Street and closing the beautiful entrance rotunda to the public and simply encouraging homeless or some commie or animal rights looney to set up their stall in the doorway.
lauder
Member
 
Posts: 43
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 1:49 pm

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby GrahamH » Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:03 am

Yes lauder, fully agreed on that point. The first time I saw the barrier across the corridor, I thought an event was on, the second time okay, an unfortunate coincidence - the third and it became apparent the entire entrance from Westmoreland Street is now permanently sealed off. What on earth is going on? This was once the grandest and most exhilarating processional route in the city, now shamefully closed off to public view. It's not even as if they're cutting down on door staff - indeed there seems to be more security personnel than ever now huddled in the lobby outside the Lords chamber. Also agreed on the increasing numbers of exhibitionists taking possession of the Lords entrance. It's bad enough as it is as a blank frontage without having the entrance sealed off to boot.

On a wider level, Bank of Ireland needs to draw up a management plan for the building. Not only is the majority of the interior in serious need of redecoration, a rationalisation of corporate furniture, signage and mechanical services is also sorely in order. It's surprising no work was carried out during the boom years. I'd imagine public perception is that Bank of Ireland threw lavish sums at the building during that time, when the opposite is in fact the case - it could even be described as grotty in large part. Indeed, not a cent of major capital funds has been spent on it since the second exterior cleaning of the early 1990s.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4592
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby gunter » Thu Apr 22, 2010 12:50 am

The 'prestigious' nature of the existing bank use completely passes me by. I detest banks and have always done so, long before the onset of the recent unpleasantness.

GrahamH wrote:. . . . . . to accommodate the masses clambering over their great steps, fingering their columns and wandering aimlessly about their great halls. Critically in all of this, they become objects for those least interested and least connected to their local value – the tourist - while the citizen for whom the building was once built gets pushed to the sidelines.


That's a little bit harsh there Graham. Tourists are very unfairly derided IMO.

OK, maybe the loud-mouth, bloated, perpetually dissatisfied American types that descend from air-conditioned coaches on Nassau Street in chequered trousers could reasonably be gassed en-masse [no offence intended], but the great bulk of the contemporary hoards of European city-breakers are in a different league and they bring with them, in their volume and feed-back, a direct critical analysis of the city, what it has to offer, and the quality of it's public realm. I see nothing wrong in judging ourselves by the criteria; 'what does the tourist get from this?'

GrahamH wrote:There is one solitary alternative use, and one use only, that comes in any way close to appropriately interpreting the intensely tangled collection of baggage that comes with the Bank of Ireland, and that is, as suggested, a City of Dublin Museum. The story of the capital that brought the building into being – there are few better compliments.


Nobody stamps their authority on a suggestion like Graham, so this could be a runner.

I note PVC's observations on the labyrinthine nature of the building, but in the context of museum use, that would not necessarily be a negative.

This is the best floor plan I can find. The 'bank' interventions, post 1801, were much less comprehensive than originally intended. I've marked out Johnston's cash office in blue and the site of the original House of Commons chamber in yellow. The areas outlined in green are courtyards and open space.

Image
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1925
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby reddy » Thu Apr 22, 2010 9:39 am

Interesting thread. Its a huge pity that this building is cut off from the city by a wall of yellow and blue buses and speeding cars. Have to agree that this building needs to be opened up for civic use. What an addition a new museum or some other similarly prestigious function would be to Dame Street and to College Green.

Has anyone any pictures of the interior? Or pictures of the John Soane proposal for the Westin site?
reddy
Member
 
Posts: 313
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 11:03 am
Location: Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby gunter » Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:12 am

Apparently Dublin Bus have 're-designed' their whole network, according to the radio this morning, so we'll wait and see if reduces or increases the volume of the yellow and blue wall.

Image

a plundered view of Johnson's Cash-Office ceiling.

And Below, two versions of Soane's design for the pre-Act-of-Union Bank of Ireland headquarters for the trianglular site bounded by D'Olier St./College St./Westmoreland St.

Image

Image

All very Washington D.C. meets the Winter Palace
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1925
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby reddy » Thu Apr 22, 2010 1:09 pm

Cheers Gunter.
reddy
Member
 
Posts: 313
Joined: Wed Oct 26, 2005 11:03 am
Location: Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby tommyt » Thu Apr 22, 2010 2:07 pm

It's very true the building itself is a warren of small spaces, most of which are very pretty in their own right, the rear courtyard could be fabulous, its a fantastic intimate space that could easily be incorporated into the 'vibe' of Foster Place.
tommyt
Member
 
Posts: 455
Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 7:39 pm
Location: D5

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby fergalr » Thu Apr 22, 2010 11:02 pm

gunter wrote:
Image

All very Washington D.C. meets the Winter Palace


Monticello on protein shakes.
fergalr
Senior Member
 
Posts: 513
Joined: Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:33 pm
Location: Howth, Co. Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby thebig C » Tue Apr 27, 2010 4:55 pm

Hey Gunther

Many thanks for posting the pics of Soanes proposed Bank of Ireland. It makes you wistful thinking what a beautiful assembly of building we would have had around College green had it been started a few years earlier!

I am always interested to see proposals that never quite got built. There are a number of famous Victorian examples, but this is one of the few Georgian I can think of. I know its off topic but I always wondered given the expansion of Dublin as a trade centre in the late 1700s, was it ever proposed to construct a purpose built City Hall? As opposed to converting the Royal Exchange.

C
thebig C
Member
 
Posts: 203
Joined: Sat Sep 13, 2008 2:55 pm

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby Pete » Tue Apr 27, 2010 5:46 pm

GrahamH's remarks about tourists are a bit harsh. Tourists provide much of the money which the local people survive on and so should be encouraged, without this money locals may not even have need for a bank!

A pedestrianised plaza at College Green, as suggested in another thread, with the Bank of Ireland building as the focal point as some sort of museum/exhibition centre would be the jewel in the crown of the city. The space created would be enjoyed by both locals and tourists and would allow the building to be appreciated by those in the plaza without a screen of buses. Entrances such as that off Westmoreland Street could be reinstated also.

The renovation costs would be enormous but if cleverly designed to reduce running costs while remain sympathetic to the structure, a museum could possibly be viable. This would be a great addition to Dublin and would be great to see in time for 1916 centenary.
Pete
Member
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Apr 27, 2010 3:26 pm

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby GrahamH » Tue Apr 27, 2010 11:57 pm

Yes the comments about tourists were a little sweeping (though having worked at the coalface of tourist heritage sites, your eyes get quickly opened to the reality of the game). But the general point is one of reluctance to exclude the populace from the building on a day-to-day basis, rather than any antipathy towards visitors. These buildings were built (or adapted) for patrons’ use while conducting everyday business, exposing one to a fleeting dose of grandiosity – the Georgian equivalent of a swig of L. casei Immunitas for the aesthetically-dependant – as part of daily life. This is a ceremony that has even greater impact in today’s world, and one that should not be erased in a hasty clamour to give a perceived ‘dignity’ to such a building as seen through modern eyes – this is especially true of the Public Office of the GPO. There is little more dignified that a construct serving its intended function.

gunter, agreed in relation to the dubious (and latterly nonexistent) prestige of banks, but the nature of the occupant is not the core point. What I was trying to say is that the building retains an air of prestige because the Bank of Ireland possesses it for that very reason – it wants to command a public presence, make a civic statement, and generally be pretentious about its operations. As such, and with banking in the hierarchical scheme of things pretty tightly woven into modern society, for good or evil, the building on College Green is lent a very special significance in its current role. It is fit for purpose. Its very (what one imagines to be) uneconomic viability is the very reason that it is viable – its extravagance is what lends it such appeal, what makes its design relevant, and what makes its positioning in the city appropriate as it ever was. Realistically speaking, outside of a predictable and enforced State occupancy, there is no other deserved use for this building.

The enormous architectural and heritage value of the building as converted into a bank has always considerably underplayed. Indeed, the majority of the building that stands today is the result of the complex’s lengthy, hugely expensive and extremely accomplished modification for banking use. It is more a bank than a parliament house. The conversion is one of Francis Johnston’s finest works, one that is rarely assessed beyond a haze of politics and nostalgia, or without the usual denigrating stance of the project being one of mere tweaking around the edges. The alteration was an immensely challenging prospect, one that involved the assimilation of the work of four previous architects’ work into a coherent whole, coupled with the over-riding demand of preserving the primacy and design intention of Pearce’s masterpiece. In fact, it is as much what Johnston did not do, amongst ever-heightening calls for bells and whistles Regency embellishment to the existing exterior, as much as what he did do, that is to his immense credit as project architect.

C. P, Curran’s outstanding essay on the conversion of the Parliament House to Bank of Ireland, published in a quarterly Bulletin of the Irish Georgian Society in 1977, remains the leading account on this much-unknown part of the building’s – really the city’s - history. We can directly quote the correspondence of Johnston in due course, but sticking with the decision to build or acquire a new headquarters in the first place, we must look to north of the Liffey to the site of St. Mary’s Abbey, where the Bank of Ireland had established itself in 1783 off East Arran Street. This was still a commercially thriving part of town, though the brick building in which the bank was located was not secure, forcing the institution to look elsewhere as it expanded. The enormous growth in the scale of the bank in the space of two decades, from being located in a modest premises in a secondary part of the city to proposing a bombastic palace on the city’s principal thoroughfare – indeed comprising a city thoroughfare in the case of the Soane proposal – is truly extraordinary, even by Anglo standards.

Tying in with thebig C’s comments above, suggestions were made during the 1780s that the Royal Exchange should be converted into the National Bank, while James Malton advocated in 1786 that the Exchange be moved into the old Custom House which was shortly to be vacated by the new building downstream in 1791, noting: “where I have heard the Bank is intended to be built, a most ineligible site indeed.” The Bank even petitioned the Lord Lieutenant for the grant of ground occupied by the old Custom House and a second time in 1795 – both efforts to no avail. It was because of this intransigence on the part of the State that negotiations were opened with the Wide Streets Commissioners in 1799 regarding the Westmoreland Street site – what Curran describes as the entire site bounded by Westmorland Street, College Street, D’Olier Street and the river – not just to the Fleet Street boundary. The deal fell through for the simple reason that the Wide Streets Commission did not yet own all the land, the majority of which it had purchased from Trinity College. Much of it has already been cleared and enclosed, but as the Commissioners where short of funds to purchase the remaining lands at that point (the war with France having a huge impact on finances, with the Commission already enormously in debt), the Bank finally pulled out of the agreement in 1802. Architect Thomas Sherrard drew up plans for Westmoreland Street in 1799 to include the Bank, with College Street marked out as ‘Bank Street’ (can you imagine how that street sign would be corrupted today?). This is the same year as the Commission’s architect, Henry Aaron Baker, drew up approved elevations for the rest of Westmoreland Street.


Image



Image

Presumably the two drawings above (there are seven Soane designs in total) are what Curran refers to in relation to Bank Street, with a building frontage:

“of 320 feet. For this front Soane prepared two alternative elevations for the new bank, one of 287 feet 6 inches in length and the other of 260 feet; the rest of his building was disposed on the longer sides of the wedge-shaped site about two internal courtyards separated by his central block which consisted of portico, vestibule, hall and a cash office, 90 feet by 60 feet.” “The drawings in some cases are signed and dated and are accompanied by an undated printed sheet tabulating the Bank’s requirements.”

As early as 1801 the Bank was actively considering the Parliament House site as the most practical solution to its needs (not to mention much slimmed down, given the depression in the Dublin economy). A definite proposal was made in March 1802, with the Bank purchasing ground at Foster Place from the Commissioners in May of the same year. In June an Act of Parliament was passed enabling the disposal of the former Parliament House, and on the 27th of August 1803 the Seal of the Corporation was directed to be put to the deed of conveyance, passing the building into the possession of Bank of Ireland.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4592
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby thebig C » Wed Apr 28, 2010 4:48 pm

Thanks for that very imformative post Graham.

Was it the Sherrard design or perhaps an early Baker plan which proposed a collonade along Westmorland St?

Also, in relation to the final proposed site for the Bank, by College Street would that include the large traffic island at the side of Trinity. In other words would the Bank have closely abutted the side of the College?
thebig C
Member
 
Posts: 203
Joined: Sat Sep 13, 2008 2:55 pm

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby PVC King » Sat May 15, 2010 10:41 am

Bank of Ireland to sell art collection
Saturday, 15 May 2010 07:42
Bank of Ireland is to sell its art collection and put the proceeds towards its community and charitable investment programme.

The bank currently owns 2,000 pieces of art, which is one of the largest collections in the country.

The works, which are valued at €5m, will be sold on the open market.

A spokeswoman for AIB has said the future of its art collection was under review.

A spokeswoman for Anglo Irish Bank said any decision on the future of its collection would be made by its board and management in line with the wishes of the Minister for Finance.

Labour Spokeswoman on Arts Mary Upton said all of the banks' art collection should be made available to the public.


The proceeds should be taken off the next preference dividend and the collection kept intact if the government will allow BoI to off set the tax benefits of the donations to their charitable programmes; if you had to paint 2,000 walls to cover up the picture staining it could cost close to €5m making this almost a revenue neutral exercise. Barings still has its art collection and they were in a much worse state than BoI and this way the bank could buy the collection which has been carefully assembled over time back when their business plan bears fruit; scattering the collection to the four winds into a very poor art market makes no sense except for the auctioneer who gets the fee.

There is no doubt great anger being directed at the banks at present due to their lending policies but tokinistic gestures such as this are just as short sighted as the lending policies that put them into this position in the first place. Sorting out the BoI balance sheet will hinge on their capital raising which will be billions in scale and in that regard €5m less the costs of repainting the affected walls denuded of their art will be a pittance.
PVC King
 

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby gunter » Sat May 15, 2010 3:11 pm

When they say 'art collection' . . . .

Image

. . . I don't know if I'd panic too much about some of this stuff getting dispersed to the four corners .
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1925
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby Smithfield Resi » Wed Jun 23, 2010 12:35 am

'Art' escaping from the wax museum 'plus'. Another fine Tourism Dublin enterprise.

Image
Smithfield Resi
Member
 
Posts: 220
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 3:03 am

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby GrahamH » Wed Jun 23, 2010 12:54 am

Yes, the developments in Foster Place of late are so outrageous they beggar belief. One could not manifestly convey the gombeen mindset that permeates such large swathes of Irish small business thinking any better if one tried - and by association, Irish planning, or rather the apparent complete lack thereof.

An integral element of the composition and setting of the nation's pre-eminent classical building, and one of the city's finest historic enclaves, is comandeered by paddywhackery of the worst order, and not so much as a whimper from the planning authority! Indeed it even receives national attention over a preposterous media stunt involving the Minister for Tourism who (only too rightly) failed to attend its opening on multiple occasions, and still nothing! Every last scrap of the above muck, along with associated trashy blue lights which have been erected by the same private enterprise on all of the publically owned trees of Foster Place, demands immediate removal.

Could somebody please give us some hope that there are people in charge in this city. The recent addition of even more licenced taxi spaces on the street by the public authority merely adds insult to injury, while the insertion of a parking meter into the west portico of the bank is truly the icing on the cake.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4592
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby PVC King » Wed Jun 23, 2010 7:12 am

That W sign over the door case is truely shocking and the bloke on the right looks like he is urinating; the WAX letters are clearly a trip hazard on a public footpath.

Someone should complain....
PVC King
 

Re: Bank of Ireland, College Green

Postby hutton » Wed Jun 23, 2010 1:20 pm

Dublin Tourism get €900,000 per annum from DCC, some of which they are now spending on other illegal advertising at their own listed premises - see shopfront race to bottom thread, snap by smithfield resi.

Hence DCC is collecting rates from compliant owners to effectively subsidise cheapening illegal developments dumbing-down and degrading the city centre.

The Dublin Tourism website itself is also a good laugh; first option available in the left hand side is for visitors to go "Beyond Dublin". Clearly DT have a real commitment to this city if the first thing they can do is direct business away from the capital :rolleyes:
... not that tourists will really want to stick about if the treatment of our most important buildings is of the standard seen now in Foster Place or DT's own HQ at Andrew Street.

By the way DCC have themselves gone to great effort to erect brown directional signs for tourists promoting the Foster Place Disgrace - as can be seen at Beckett Bridge, Suffolk Street and elsewhere.

Great to see what the taxes grabbed from other private businesses are being spent on.

When the last intelligent person leaves Dublin, can they please turn out the lights :mad:
hutton
Senior Member
 
Posts: 993
Joined: Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:14 pm
Location: NAMA HQ

PreviousNext

Return to Ireland



cron