Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby CologneMike » Sun Jan 04, 2009 9:32 pm

History
The construction of public, or social, housing, in Limerick began in the early years of the twentieth century, and more than seven thousand houses were built by Limerick Corporation between 1919 and 1991.

Initially the building of social housing by Limerick Corporation arose from the need to rehouse the large number of people living in unfit houses near the centre of the City. Contemporary reports refer to housing where densities ranged from 100-250 houses per hectare, often with three to four people living per room.

The Ballinacurra Weston Scheme was completed in the 1950s, but the lands had originally been selected in 1919, when it was proposed that these sites could be combined with sites at Carey’s Road to form a single housing area capable of accommodating at least 5,000 people.

By the 1960s, the principal reason for the construction of social housing was affordability, and more than 1,700 houses were built over a ten year period. The major housing provision occurred in Southill, where O’Malley Park, Keyes Park and Kennedy Park were laid out surrounding a new privately provided shopping centre and industrial area at Roxboro, located on either side of the new Childer’s Road which connected the Dublin and Cork Roads.

Keyes Park, Kincora Park and O’Malley Park were all completed between 1968 and 1972. By then, Southill was the largest Corporation estate in the city, with 1,201 houses containing 6,500 inhabitants. In recent times, many of those housing estates that are located within the Regeneration Area suffer from acute problems of disadvantage, and have been the focus of negative publicity.

Source: Limerick Regeneration Agency ~ Masterplan Ballinacurra Weston and Southill
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Re: Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby CologneMike » Thu May 21, 2009 12:22 am

Allotments in Southill? It's an idea at least

(Limerick Leader ~ Chalkboard ~ posted by ISAMBARD CHALKY BRUNEL)

Through a happy mix of diggers and petrol bombs, Donogh O'Malley Park is becoming a rural landscape again as houses fall one row at a time.

The estate is still an abject sight of ruin and isolation. But there are shoots of ideas and creation under all that rubble.

Mattie Gardiner, who's lived in the estate since the 1970s, has spent the last three years tending to an allotment on land cleared after a row of houses was demolished.

He has strawberries, tomatoes, spuds, lettuce and carrots. He has dedication, ideas and pride. :cool:

His nephew Robert is running for the local elections, and is calling for more allotments to be provided for by the City Council in the space cleared by housing knocked for Regeneration.

Electioneering aside, it is clear that this land has to be used for something. It isn't sceptical to say that Regeneration won't get the money to build anything for at least a decade.

That's a bitter shame but it's a fact.

No doubt this idea will be dismissed by the local authority as too high an expense for a medium-term measure. But anything that would add any tint of character to an estate being drained of life cannot be dismissed.

It may be an unrealistic idea, but it is an idea nonetheless. Too much of our time and thought and energy has been lost to complaints and cynicism these days.
Fresh thinking should be celebrated in a city that seems bereft of it.
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Re: Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby CologneMike » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:39 pm

LIMERICK CLOTHING FACTORY SITE TO BECOME RESIDENTIAL AREA FOR ELDERLY (live95fm)

15 February 2010

A site in Limerick city which was once home to one of the biggest clothing factories in the world is set to become a residential area for elderly people currently living in regeneration areas of the city.

Construction is set to begin later this year on up to 50 housing units on the site on Lord Edward Street - the former home to the historic Tait's Clothing Factory, which later became known as Limerick Clothing Factory.

The company used to supply uniforms to armies in different wars during the 18th and 19th centuries.

Director of housing services, Kieran Lehane says the site on Lord Edward Street is ideally suited for their needs.


Funding pledged for two Limerick housing projects (Irish Times)

JAMIE SMYTH Social Affairs Correspondent

Fri, Mar 05, 2010

THE GOVERNMENT has pledged to provide the cash to start building two housing projects in Limerick before the end of the year to signal its commitment to the city’s regeneration project.

It also revealed yesterday the total cost of the project to the State has fallen by at least €400 million because of the recession and further savings will be made by refurbishing rather than rebuilding some existing houses.

“The €1.7 billion cost of the project has fallen . . . The cost of construction has dropped by 25 per cent over the last two years. This chips €400 million off that figure. Some houses will now be refurbished on the estates and this is cheaper too,” said Minister of State for Housing Michael Finneran.

He said he had given the go-ahead for two specific housing projects that would deliver more than 100 units of accommodation ahead of a draft plan due to be submitted by the Limerick Regeneration agency later this month.

The first project on Lord Edward Street will deliver 70 units of housing for elderly people. A second project in Moyross would deliver 48 social housing units, said Mr Finneran.
Two further housing projects in Southill and St Mary’s Park may also begin this year, he added.

He said he was taking the initiative to address growing public disillusionment with the flagship project, which has suffered from a cash crisis.

Mr Finneran said one of the main problems facing the project was a lack of private-sector money available in co-financing. It had been anticipated that €1.6 billion would be made available from private developers, along with the €1.7 billion in State funding.

He said he would support proposals to offer tax incentives designed to attract private money.

Last month, former minister for defence Willie O’Dea signalled that costs of €1.7 billion could not be afforded by Government due to the recession. He promoted the idea of offering tax breaks as incentives to local developers. . . . . . . .


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So can we take this “pledge” from the Minister of State for Housing Michael Finneran that 50 or 70 units of housing for elderly people (Ballinacurra Weston) will definitely go ahead this year? Interesting that not so long ago the City Council tried to dispose this valuable site!

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Re: Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby Dan Sullivan » Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:58 pm

Would I be right in thinking Finneran mentioned "lease-back" on Prime Time last night?
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Re: Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby Tuborg » Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:50 pm

CologneMike wrote:LIMERICK CLOTHING FACTORY SITE TO BECOME RESIDENTIAL AREA FOR ELDERLY


Can't say I'm overly enthused by this plan. It's not really going to do anything to improve the social mix in this area of the city!

I'm not for a moment suggesting that these elderly people don't deserve adequate housing. But there are plenty of other options that could have been considered. Instead the council have gone for the easy way out!

There aren't too many sites of this calibre in the city centre and the poorly designed city campus development next door has already proved to be a wasted opportunity! Personally I would have liked to have seen a high quality residential development suited to families etc built here. Maybe that's just wishful thinking though!
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Re: Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby Tuborg » Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:58 pm

Incidentally, last night's Prime Time had a piece on Limerick Regeneration, including visits to Southill, Moyross and Ballinacurra Weston.

It starts around the 18 minute mark. Incredible stuff really! :rolleyes:
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Re: Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby CologneMike » Sat Mar 06, 2010 12:17 am

Tuborg wrote:Can't say I'm overly enthused by this plan. It's not really going to do anything to improve the social mix in this area of the city!

Personally I would have liked to have seen a high quality residential development suited to families etc built here. Maybe that's just wishful thinking though!


After seeing Prime time, obviously the elderly citizens are being prioritized here by the regeneration agency first and rightly so! Most of these elderly people will be probably giving up their private family homes to move in there. In my opinion this location is ideal for their needs i.e. close proximity to shop, to socialize, access to medical services etc, etc, on the fringe of the city centre.

I think we can already see a positive mix of people wanting to live in the Lower Edward Street area. The vicinity of the Peoples Park is a recreational bonus. I personally would prefer to see 70 high quality apartments been built here for the elderly rather than housing units. Nicely landscaped greens to compliment thus optimizing a precious inner city land bank.

Prime Time tried to pin down the Minister of State for Housing Michael Finneran to commit the government to the Masterplan for regeneration which would lead to blue prints for its construction. Alas, to date nobody has seen anything concrete of these plans!

Elderly Southill residents rehoused in Castletroy's Park Village after harassment (Limerick Leader)

Published Date: 22 January 2010

By Kerrie Kennedy

THIRTEEN elderly people and families are to be moved to Castletroy because of the anti-social behaviour they are experiencing in their Southill homes.

The Southside Regeneration Agency has confirmed that 13 apartments have been secured in the Park Village residential home for elderly victims of harassment in the Southill area.

Director of Southside Social Regeneration Brendan Hayden said that the people are being moved because they are at "very serious risk" in their current homes.

"The idea behind it is to help elderly people who are suffering and want to find some peace," Mr Hayden said.

To date, one person has been successfully moved from her home in Keyes Park to the residential village in Castletroy.

"The abuse of that resident was so serious we felt she would have died of a heart-attack if we did not get her out when we did," Mr Hayden said.

He confirmed that a number of elderly people from Keyes Park were interested in moving, as were three other families from Carew Park.

The move to Castletroy Park Village, which is partially funded by the Department of the Environment, will provide elderly victims of anti-social behaviour with a "safer home" that they can afford, according to Mr Hayden.

He said that moving people out was the only option as the majority of the harassment is coming from children who cannot be prosecuted.

This is due to the current law which prevents children under the age of 12 being charged for committing crimes and engaging in anti-social behaviour.

Southill parish priest Father Pat Hogan said that there is an urgent need for a change in the law regarding children under 12, and that the Health Service Executive (HSE) needs to be more proactive in helping the families of these children. "Some of these young children start losing their way as early as eight and nine and are wreaking havoc on the area, they badly need direction," Fr Hogan said.

"The current law needs to be changed so that these children or their parents are held responsible for their actions and the HSE must be more proactive locally in working alongside the parents of these children because they desperately need help," Fr Hogan added.

The Southill parish priest said that moving elderly residents to Castletroy is only a temporary measure until the Regeneration Agency builds them more suitable homes nearer to Southill.
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Re: Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby Tuborg » Sat Mar 06, 2010 3:12 pm

CologneMike wrote:After seeing Prime time, obviously the elderly citizens are being prioritized here by the regeneration agency first and rightly so! Most of these elderly people will be probably giving up their private family homes to move in there. In my opinion this location is ideal for their needs i.e. close proximity to shop, to socialize, access to medical services etc, etc, on the fringe of the city centre.

I think we can already see a positive mix of people wanting to live in the Lower Edward Street area. The vicinity of the Peoples Park is a recreational bonus. I personally would prefer to see 70 high quality apartments been built here for the elderly rather than housing units. Nicely landscaped greens to compliment thus optimizing a precious inner city land bank.



A reasonably high density apartment complex is the only way to go here. Anything less would just be an utter waste!

The problem I see with Edward Street is that you couldn't exactly say it's buzzing with activity. Which is a pity as it's a pleasant enough place to stroll around! Although maybe this project will breathe a bit of life back into the area!

I was just thinking though. Seeing as how the council actually own this site. It might have been an ideal opportunity for them to pilot one of those sustainable urban living projects they have been trying to promote!
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Re: Regeneration of Southside ~ Ballinacurra Weston and Southill

Postby CologneMike » Sat Sep 04, 2010 12:21 am

Criticism of Limerick plan rule change

FRANK McDONALD, Environment Editor

FIFTEEN FIRMS of architects selected 18 months ago to design schemes for the plan to regenerate Limerick are being told that a change in the ground rules means they will have to compete for every project.

“It appears that everything will have to be re-tendered, and that could take months,” said John Graby, director of the Royal Institute of the Architects of Ireland.

“Design teams who prepared designs and made submissions could have to start all over again.”

He said the change in procurenent at this late stage – apparently decreed by the Department of Finance – represented a “massive waste” of resources.“If the Government is serious about regenerating Limerick, it has to find a way to take control of this.”

Mr Graby said he would be raising the issue at a meeting next week of the consultative committee on the construction industry, which is chaired by the Department of Finance, and seeking assurances that the Limerick regeneration project would proceed as planned.

The process of procuring architectural services was initiated by the Limerick Regeneration scheme in April 2008, when it advertised for “pre-qualification” submissions. A shortlist was drawn up in June of that year and a final selection of 15 firms made in February 2009.

One of the architects whose firms were selected for the framework plan said: “This has been trundling on for more than two years and, having finally got the Government on board, it now appears they will not be able to use the framework they put in place.”

The firms selected were Bucholz McEvoy, OMP, PKA, Seán Harrington, Traynor O’Toole, Carr Cotter Naessens, Donnelly Turpin, DTA, Elliott Maguire Landers, Healy and Partners, McGarry Ní Éanaigh, Downey McConville, Murray Ó Laoire and Newenham Mulligan.

“Our understanding was that it would go forward and that at least a number of projects would proceed, having been cleared by the Government,” one of them said, “but nothing major has been commissioned since then, apart from a few small feasibility studies.”

Brendan Kenny, chief executive of Limerick Regeneration, said framework agreements were “no longer flavour of the month these days” and the view now being taken by the department was that it would be “better to open it up to more competition”. Although Limerick Regeneration had not yet been “directed” to abandon the February 2009 framework agreement, Mr Kenny said a lot of things had changed since then. Some of the firms on the panel were “in a different situation” – including one that went into liquidation.

Next week, Limerick Regeneration would be advertising tenders for architects and engineers for a small project of 30 units for senior citizens in Southill “and the firms on the list can compete for that as well”, he said, adding: “We’re anxious to move on.”

He would also be seeking clarification from the Departments of Finance and the Environment “on whether we can use” the framework agreement in light of the changed circumstances. Mr Kenny denied that the work done by architects on the list was wasted.

© 2010 The Irish Times


The Department of Finance plays the tunes and regeneration dances one step forward, two steps back. :(
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