old illustrations of limerick

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Mon Dec 28, 2009 8:55 pm

CologneMike wrote:
KeepAnEyeOnBob wrote:Some interesting photos here. I think I'll have to put those Limerick historical photo books on my wishlist.


Indeed a lot of interesting stuff published over the years!

  • University of Limerick A Celebration ~ Begley Hutton
  • Dowd's History Of Limerick ~ Cian O'Carroll
  • Remembering Limerick ~ David Lee
  • Georgian Limerick ~ David Lee / Bob Kelly
  • Made in Limerick Volume 1 ~ David Lee / Debbie Jacobs
  • James Pain Architect ~ David Lee / Debbie Jacobs
  • Limerick 100 Stories of the Century ~ Denis O'Shaughnessy
  • How's your Father Stories of Limerick ~ Denis O'Shaughnessy
  • Stories Of Limerick ~ Denis O'Shaughnessy
  • Limerick Boycott 1904 ~ Dermot Keogh / Andrew McCarthy
  • Father Browne's Limerick ~ E.E. O'Donnell
  • Last Word by the Listener ~ Seamus O'Cinneide / Eoin Devereux
  • The Sieges and Treaty of Limerick ~ Frank Noonan
  • The Hunt Museum ~ Helen Armitage
  • The Pery Square Tontine ~ James McMahon
  • From out of Limerick ~ Jeremiah Newman
  • The Limerick Anthology ~ Jim Kemmy
  • The Limerick Compendium ~ Jim Kemmy
  • Limerick Journals ~ Jim Kemmy & Co.
  • Limerick in old picture postcards ~ Jim Kemmy / Larry Walsh
  • The Building of Limerick ~ Judith Hill
  • Anatomy of a Siege 1642 ~ Kenneth Wiggins
  • King John's Castle ~ Kenneth Wiggins
  • Limerick Historical Reflections ~ Kevin Hannan
  • Limerick Soviet ~ Liam Cahill
  • Through Irish Eyes ~ Malachy McCourt
  • Angela's Ashes ~ Frank McCourt
  • The Government and the People of Limerick ~ Mathew Potter
  • Remember Jim Kemmy ~ Paul O'Reilly
  • St. John's Cathedral Conservation Project ~ Rev. T. Mullins
  • In the Shadow of the Spire ~ Rev. W. Fitzmaurice / Kevin Hannon
  • Limerick a stroll down Memory Lane Volumes 1 - 7 ~ Sean Curtin
  • Limerick Images of a changed city ~ Sean Reynolds / Tony Hartnett
  • The History of Limerick City ~ Sean Spellissy
  • Limerick In Old Photographs ~ Sean Spellissy
  • Limerick The Rich Land ~ Sean Spellissy
  • Shannon Airport ~ Valerie Sweeny
  • Ireland's Shannon Story ~ Brian Callanan
  • The Shannon Scheme ~ Andy Bielenberg
  • High Tension Life on the Shannon Scheme ~ Michael McCarthy
  • Bunratty Castle & Historical Park
  • Ferrars History Of Limerick


Here more interesting stuff of local interest. Most of it is new, some of it very old.

  • Limerick Handbook of Local History ~ Coiste Oideachais Múinteoirí Luimnigh
  • Made in Limerick Volume 2 ~ David Lee / Debbie Jacobs
  • Images of Sarsfield Barracks; ~ Denis Carroll
  • Kemmy's Limerick Miscellany ~ Denis O'Shaughnessy
  • The Cromwellian Settlement of the County of Limerick ~ James Grene Barry
  • Limerick Journal Volumes 1 - 43 ~ Jim Kemmy & Co.
  • The Diocese of Limerick Ancient and Medieval ~ Rev. John Begley C.C.
  • The Diocese of Limerick 16th and 17th Centuries ~ John Canon Begley
  • Limerick Street Antiquities ~ Limerick Civic Trust
  • The First 25 Years 1983 - 2008 ~ Limerick Civic Trust
  • The Limerick We Don't See no.1-3 ~ Limerick Civic Trust
  • Georgian Limerick Vol 2 ~ Limerick Civic Trust
  • First Citizens Of The Treaty City ~ Matthew Potter
  • Foynes Flying Boat Museum ~ Maureen O'Hara Blair
  • History of Limerick ~ Maurice Lenihan
  • The Castles of County Limerick ~ Michael J Carroll
  • The Architectural Heritage of Limerick City ~ NIAH
  • A Clune's Lane Fisherman ~ Pat Doran
  • The Shannon Navigation ~ Ruth Delany
  • Limerick a stroll down Memory Lane Vol 8-9 ~ Sean Curtin
  • The Abbey Fishermen ~ Sharon Clancy
  • The 1654-56 Civil Survey of Limerick City and County ~ Simmington
  • The Knights of Glin. Seven centuries of Change ~ Tom Donovan
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby gunter » Mon Jan 11, 2010 12:28 am

I can't place these houses, similar features to the Bank Place three, moulded cills, pretty consistent window height, but with tripartite key stones, anyone know where in Limerick they were? The houses flanking the lane on the near side seem to be three-storey, at most, and gable-fronted [Broad Street?]

Image

. . . . my money's on CologneMike, but Tuborg could be a dark horse :)
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Mon Jan 11, 2010 1:24 pm

Broad Street ~ Campbell’s Bow

Bang on Gunter! That seems to be our Campbell’s Bow on Broad Street. See posts 243 and 242.

Clohesys No.11 appears also in post 348 on the right handside alas the link to the Getty-Images is not automatically displaying.

If it is not displaying then copy and paste the image link into your browser.

Image

The no. of the shop M O’Donovan (your image) on the right is confusing . . . . it seems to be no. 10 but it should be no. 12?

Image
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Feb 13, 2010 12:01 am

  • Limerick History and Society ~ Liam Irwin and Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh
  • Limerick : Irish Historic Towns Atlas No 21 ~ Eamon O'Flaherty

See links for more book info 9780906602492 9781904890553

Recession or not, here another two quality books of local interest recently released. :cool:

Hmmm . . . . Gunter, though I have yet to see them, I have a feeling that they could be still ignoring the tall Dutch-gabled houses built in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries around Limerick.

  • Limerick 1651 Map and Booklet ~ John Elliott


Junior, how did the launch of this publication go? Where can one get a copy of it, as neither the Civic Trust nor O’Mahony’s have it listed on their web sites yet?

The most important publication on the city’s history since 1866 (Irish Examiner)

By Jimmy Woulfe Mid-West Correspondent

A MAJOR publication on the history of Limerick was launched in the city’s Georgian Quarter last night by Mayor Kevin Kiely.

Limerick, the newly published atlas in the Irish Historic Towns Atlas Series, features illustrations, plans and accounts of the city. The collection includes three Elizabethan maps from about 1590, which pre-date Dublin’s earliest known map by 20 years.

The lanes of Limerick so pertinent to Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes have long since disappeared, but are preserved in the atlas with unusual lane names of Spreadeagle, Scabby, Red Lion, White Wine or Bear Lane.

Laura Ryan of the Limerick Coordination office said: "If you ever wondered why the heart of Limerick city today is not centred on its historic foundations at St Mary’s Cathedral or what the city may have looked like with its walls intact, the answers are in the Atlas published by the Royal Irish Academy. It is part of a wider European scheme of over 460 towns and cities already published."

Reproduced are 27 rare maps, and 12 views of the city from various repositories in Ireland and Britain.

Historian and University of Limerick lecturer Dr John Logan has described the Limerick Atlas as "the single most important publication on the history of the city since Lenihan’s history in 1866". He added: "It changes the way we look at the city as a place of work and living and make us realise the city’s immense, but too often overlooked, potential and possibilities. Planners, historians, architects, teachers, students, and all well-informed citizens will all want to have a copy. It is, simply, indispensable."

Author, and Limerick man, Dr Eamon O’Flaherty (UCD) spent years compiling topographical information from religious houses and the city’s defences to schools and administrative buildings.

Dr O’Flaherty said: "The majestic Shannon, which bred life to this Viking settlement, also offered artists a beautiful canvas to work from. The plan for the Georgian town, today’s O’Connell, Henry, and Thomas Streets etc, is clearly shown on the impressive Christopher Colles plan for the city drawn in 1769 and clearly shows the intention for a new town outside of the medieval walled city of Englishtown and Irishtown."
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Feb 13, 2010 12:35 am

Portrait of a city (Limerick Leader)

A fascinating new publication featuring paintings, sketches and the earliest detailed maps of Limerick will shed light on the development of the city and the events that shaped it, writes Jennifer Moore

HAVE you ever wondered why the heart of Limerick city today is not centred on its historic foundations at St Mary's Cathedral as a Viking port in the tenth century?

Or why the city held such strategic importance in the seventeenth-century turmoil when Limerick citizens endured three sieges?

Or what the city may have looked like if its walls and gates were not taken down in the mid-eighteenth century?

The answers to all these questions, and more, can be found in the Royal Irish Academy's latest publication, 'Irish Historic Towns Atlas, No. 21, Limerick' by Eamon O'Flaherty.

The publication offers a fascinating insight into the city's development over the centuries and the major events that shaped it.

The atlas comes in two main parts: large loose sheets of maps and views of Limerick and a text section containing an essay describing the urban development of the city from its Viking foundations to the start of the 20th century.

Several thematic maps project Viking and medieval Limerick onto a modern map, pinpointing sites such as the original Viking longport near Athlunkard, the Frank House of Knight's Templar, or the long since disappeared, St Nicholas's Church.

There is also an extensive gazetteer of topographical information that breaks down into 22 sections that range from population, to the street names, factories, areas of primary production, hospitals, entertainment and residences, for example.

To accompany the text, and help bring Limerick's urban history to life, there are 27 historical and reconstructed maps and 12 views and photographs of Limerick depicting its growth, shape and importance as a trading post and one of military significance.

This work on Limerick is the fruit of many years of research by author and Limerick man, Dr Eamon O'Flaherty, a former Crescent student who now lectures in UCD.

The atlas traces the complicated histories of Limerick's three distinct urban cores: the Viking and Anglo-Norman Englishtown located on King's Island; the medieval Irishtown off the axis of Broad Street and John Street; and the Georgian Newtown Pery where today's city is concentrated.

Limerick is exceptionally well endowed in terms of illustrations, maps, plans and accounts of the city. The three earliest maps are from about 1590, pre-dating Dublin's earliest known map by 20 years.

Each map, varying in style, captures Elizabethan Limerick and shows individual houses, gardens, as well as the defences and religious houses. The originals are to be found in Hunt Museum, Trinity College Dublin and the National Archives in London, so it is fascinating to be able to compare each of these cartographic wonders side by side.

Common to each is the characteristic hourglass shape of Limerick city that continues through to the late eighteenth century. On closer examination of the beautifully crafted Hardiman map (TCD), a windmill and a hound may be seen chasing a bird in Irishtown; such details as these will entrance history lovers.

When compared to the later eighteenth-century maps and plans, the development of the three urban cores in the city is quite apparent.

Other sources, such as the Civil Survey, commissioned by the Cromwellian government and completed in 1654, supplies the basis for a detailed reconstructed map of mid-seventeenth century Limerick.

It provides the reader with a snap shot of the city that highlights the different types of houses and cabins, and also positions the mills, forges and tan houses of early modern Limerick.

Much of the information from the early religious churches of the city have been taken from the famous Black Book of Limerick. It records churches such as St John's dating back to 1200. The later thirteenth-century Dominicans, Augustinians and Franciscans built their substantial religious houses on the west side of King's Island.

King John's Castle has always featured prominently on the urban landscape of Limerick and has had many functions through its near 800 year history, and was even granted to the citizens for ten years in 1427.

The castle, while domineering at times, proved to be expensive for the crown to maintain with many enhancements added to it over the centuries, as it had to withstand many assaults, sieges and undermining.

The walls of Limerick, dating to c. 1175, have been vitally important to the protection of its citizens over the centuries. They were constantly being rebuilt, extended and strengthened up to the late seventeenth century when the city was famously besieged in 1690 and 1691.

Limerick was one of the last fortresses in Ireland to have its walls removed in the 1760s. The city was expanding and needed more space for its growing population.

It was at this point when a new town, adjacent to the medieval one, was planned out by Edmond Sexton Pery, a prominent politician.

He inherited vast tracts around the city and commissioned Christopher Colles to plan a new town on his land that became known as Newtown Pery.

This sparked a flurry of building on the grid system to specifications akin to the Georgian developments in Dublin and London, and still characteristic to Limerick today.

Important buildings, such as the Custom House (now the Hunt Museum), the Matthew Bridge and the canal were built on his land. All of which improved communication and transport to Newtown Pery.

Added incentives for people to move from Englishtown and Irishtown were lower taxes, better amenities, modern housing, drainage and entertainment facilities. The Newtown was even governed by a separate body for nearly 40 years, and Limerick became the second fastest growing city in Ireland after Belfast until about 1830.

In no other town in Ireland can the divide between medieval lanes and winding streets and the grid system be seen so clearly. Colles's extraordinary plan of the city is reproduced in colour in the atlas and shows Limerick at the dawn of its greatest change – shifting the heart of the city from King's Island to Pery's land.

In terms of the various factories in the city, Limerick proved to be a bustling trading post. From mills dating back to 1,200 the city had countless granaries, stores and warehouses earning it the epithet 'The granary of North Munster'.

The nineteenth century saw a number of bacon curing factories dotted around the city including Matterson's and Shaw's. Limerick also had many markets around the city, the first documented in 1108.

The printing trade is well represented in the city, the earliest known printer was established by 1673. However, it did not become a popular trade to enter until the later eighteenth century when large numbers of printers established newspapers and printing houses, notably on the corner of Bridge Street and Mary Street where John Ferrar's Limerick Chronicle was founded in 1768, the Republic's longest running newspaper. Indeed the Leader's Office is recorded on a detailed insurance map of the city from 1897.

Longstanding Limerick institutions such as Cruises Hotel, and Todds and Cannock's department stores feature in the atlas. Their histories are traced as drapery stores in the early nineteenth century to their expansive department stores by 1900.

In the entertainment section of the gazetteer, we learn of the numerous theatres, club houses and dance halls that were the social focal point for Limerick people from the eighteenth century.

The sporting element of the city was also present in the nineteenth century with numerous gymnasiums, tennis and ball courts, bicycle, athletics, rowing and tennis clubs all forming in the second half of the nineteenth century.

For more on the project see http://www.ria.ie/projects/ihta, or contact Irish Historic Towns Atlas,
Royal Irish Academy, 19 Dawson Street, Dublin 2.

Irish Historic Towns Atlas, no. 21, Limerick by Eamon O'Flaherty is available in shops from the 6th of February and retails at €35.

Jennifer Moore is an editorial assistant with the Irish Historic Towns Atlas and also a Limerick historian.
.
Attachments
IrishHistoricTownsAtlas.jpg
IrishHistoricTownsAtlas.jpg (84.21 KiB) Viewed 12597 times
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Griff » Mon Feb 15, 2010 10:23 am

  • Limerick 1651 Map and Booklet ~ John Elliott


Junior, how did the launch of this publication go? Where can one get a copy of it, as neither the Civic Trust nor O’Mahony’s have it listed on their web sites yet?



I bought my copy of the map & booklet over Christmas for 40 euro by calling into the Bishops palace ( home of Limerick Civic trust) - worth every cent... I think there were only a 100 printed - phone call or an email them to see if they have some left..061 313 399 info@limerickcivictrust.ie
Griff
Member
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2007 10:33 pm
Location: Limerick

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Griff » Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:35 am

I also went along to a free lunchtime lecture in the Hunt Museum last Thursday - part of the launch of the Royal Irish Academy's latest publication, 'Irish Historic Towns Atlas, No. 21, Limerick' by Eamon O'Flaherty. The author whizzed through 1000 years of Limerick's urban development in the hour to a packed house...excellent stuff. The book..if you could call it a book is 35euro and is a must for anyone with any interest in Limerick building history.
Griff
Member
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2007 10:33 pm
Location: Limerick

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby gunter » Mon Feb 15, 2010 12:06 pm

Great to see Limerick City getting that level of historical attention
. . . . . . gunter will have a lot of reading to do to catch up I suspect.

CologneMike wrote:[LIST]
Hmmm . . . . Gunter, though I have yet to see them, I have a feeling that they could be still ignoring the tall Dutch-gabled houses built in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries around Limerick.


surely not. As soon as I get my hands on a copy, we'll run it under the microscope and hold a bitching session, if needs be.

Well done CologneMike for identifying that 5 bay, early-Georgian, as 11 + 12 Broad Street:)

ImageImage

So this is essentially the same view

The Chinese shop at no. 12 looks like a total rebuild, but the red shop at no. 11 could well be the two storey remnant of the original structure.

Very interesting
gunter
Old Master
 
Posts: 1923
Joined: Wed Jan 16, 2008 10:33 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Mon Feb 15, 2010 9:44 pm

Griff wrote:Limerick 1651 Map and Booklet ~ John Elliott

I think there were only a 100 printed . . . . . . . . worth every cent.


Griff, that is a very limited edition and by the sound of it, a collectors item already!

I mailed the good people at the Trust earlier on today, hopefully I’ll get a favourable reply.

Limerick : Irish Historic Towns Atlas No 21 ~ Eamon O'Flaherty

. . . . . . The author whizzed through 1000 years of Limerick's urban development in the hour to a packed house...excellent stuff.


Great to read that a lot of people are very interested in their local history, that pool of interest should be tapped into, who knows what positive ideas could spring from them.

gunter wrote:So this is essentially the same view

The Chinese shop at no. 12 looks like a total rebuild, but the red shop at no. 11 could well be the two storey remnant of the original structure.

Very interesting


Also very depressing Gunter, after the exodus from the Irishtown lanes (1940-1960’s) to Garryowen, it would seem that the main thorough fares ( Mungret St. ,John St. ,Broad St.) just crumbled away. :(
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Thu Feb 18, 2010 12:21 am

It's almost impossible to look back at old photos of Limerick without a sense of acute disappointment and a feeling of what might have been!

In this case it's hard to believe that those images above are actually of Broad Street. Especially when you consider the dump that it is today! Back then the street looked strong and vibrant whereas now it's pretty much dead! :(

Mike is spot on when he says that this general area fell into terminal decline with the exodus of residents in the 50s and 60s. Aerial photographs from the time show it looking a bit like a bomb site. Consequently very little of the original fabric remains. Which is unfortunate as we could have had a spine of streets stretching from William Street through to the Abbey River with a unique character and charm.

Instead the area was "redeveloped" dismally over the last 10-20 years in a thoroughly lazy, disjointed and haphazard manner! :rolleyes:

Just going off on a bit of a tangent here but, there is now a vast swathe of underdeveloped city centre land here. With a bit of ambition and vision it could be transformed into a brand new urban quarter. If we are serious about injecting life back into the city centre and making it a more attractive place for people to live, shop, socialise and just generally spend time in. We should be looking at underutilised areas like this and examining how they could be developed and how they could become better integrated into the city centre!

Image
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Griff » Thu Feb 18, 2010 12:56 am

Have to agree - some of the cheapest nastiest rubbish built in the last 20 years has been on Mungret st/Broad st/John st... hard to believe these streets were the heart of the old Irish town.Ive been having a good look at the 1590 Hardiman colour map of Limerick thats included in the very excellent Historic Towns Atlas - Limerick ( 35euro , Hunt museum)...and those were the only real streets in the Irishtown... Today of the 3, Mungret st is the most neglected - perhaps the new market development will encourage renewal in the area... For all the negativity about the city centre,the one thing I love doing is going into the market on a Saturday morning... one wall of which marks the line of the city walls.
ps..Tuborg..your urban quarter area is close to the old Irish town - its missing the area over towards the hospital. Maybe this historic quarter needs a status that encourages growth and renewal.
Griff
Member
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2007 10:33 pm
Location: Limerick

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby jimg » Thu Feb 18, 2010 11:23 pm

CologneMike wrote:Griff, that is a very limited edition and by the sound of it, a collectors item already!

I mailed the good people at the Trust earlier on today, hopefully I’ll get a favourable reply.

Don't hold your breath; I email them a few days ago about getting a copy but haven't gotten a reply.
jimg
Member
 
Posts: 480
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 9:07 pm
Location: Zürich

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Fri Feb 19, 2010 12:05 am

Griff wrote:
ps..Tuborg..your urban quarter area is close to the old Irish town - its missing the area over towards the hospital. Maybe this historic quarter needs a status that encourages growth and renewal.


It's just a rough, general sketch to give an idea of the extent of the area that could be improved. It could be tweaked plenty of ways to include many other streets, laneways etc.

I suppose one obvious addition would be Gerald Griffin Street as it links John's Square to William Street. Again it has loads of untapped potential. There are a couple of vacant/derelict sites here that really need to be tackled. Improvements to the public realm are also badly needed as currently the street ts entirely dominated by traffic!

St John's Square is of course meant to be getting a complete revamp although it's all gone quiet on that front recently! I've heard there's been a lot of objections to the removal of car parking from the square and also to the proposal to restrict the number of access points for traffic!

Hopefully those objections can be overcome because a more pedestrian friendly environment would certainly add to the attractiveness of the square!
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Griff » Fri Feb 19, 2010 1:58 pm

jimg wrote:Don't hold your breath; I email them a few days ago about getting a copy but haven't gotten a reply.


Give them a call ... I originally sent them an email which was not answered - I thought it was a one off but maybe they dont have the resources to reply to emails - you'd think it would be easier to click out a standard reply than answer a phone call !!
Griff
Member
 
Posts: 97
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2007 10:33 pm
Location: Limerick

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:16 am

jimg wrote:Don't hold your breath; I email them a few days ago about getting a copy but haven't gotten a reply.


I can't complain, as I usually give the email address “info@” to fob off pesky telephone marketing callers at work. ;) I’ll try ringing them instead.
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sat Feb 20, 2010 2:25 am

Tuborg wrote:It's almost impossible to look back at old photos of Limerick without a sense of acute disappointment and a feeling of what might have been!


Griff wrote:Have to agree - some of the cheapest nastiest rubbish built in the last 20 years has been on Mungret st/Broad st/John st... hard to believe these streets were the heart of the old Irish town.


More disappointment on Mungret Street. :(

First image 28 Mungret Street. (Diagonally opposite Milk Market / Watergate Flats)

Second image 69-72 Mungret Street (To the right of Molyneux‘s Pub)

At least the Milk Market survived, as it went from a state of use to a state of decay and back to a state of restoration.
Attachments
MungretStreet28.JPG
MungretStreet28.JPG (53.92 KiB) Viewed 12525 times
MungretStreet69_72.jpg
MungretStreet69_72.jpg (291 KiB) Viewed 12526 times
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Mon Feb 22, 2010 10:23 pm

A few snippets from old aerial photography to document the demise of this portion of Irishtown.


Broad Street still largely intact c.1945

Image


High Street, Mungret Street with Sean Heuston Place houses under construction c.1950

Image


As above, from different angle

Image


Broad Street area c.1965

Image


High Street, Mungret Street & environs c.1965

Image
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby bonzer1again » Tue Mar 16, 2010 10:49 am

Some excellent images of Limerick to be found in this online resource....Thought I'd make sure everyone knew of its existence............

Last year, the National Library introduced an online service whereby 22,000 photographs from the Lawrence, Poole and Independent Newspapers collections were added to its website database.

Since then, library staff have digitised an additional 12,000 images from five other important National Photographic Archive collections: Eason, Stereo Pair, Clarke, Tempest and Keogh.

The 34,000 photographs of Ireland, all relating to the period 1860 to 1954, can be viewed online at http://www.nli.ie/digital-photographs.aspx .
bonzer1again
Member
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 11:19 am

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue Mar 16, 2010 2:58 pm

bonzer1again wrote:Some excellent images of Limerick to be found in this online resource....Thought I'd make sure everyone knew of its existence............

Last year, the National Library introduced an online service whereby 22,000 photographs from the Lawrence, Poole and Independent Newspapers collections were added to its website database.

Since then, library staff have digitised an additional 12,000 images from five other important National Photographic Archive collections: Eason, Stereo Pair, Clarke, Tempest and Keogh.

The 34,000 photographs of Ireland, all relating to the period 1860 to 1954, can be viewed online at http://www.nli.ie/digital-photographs.aspx .


It is indeed an excellent resource! I meant to post some images a while back but never got around to it! Here are a few I picked out anyway.

They all appear to be from the early year's of the 20th Century. Needless to say Limerick looked a far more elegant and prosperous place back then. It's hard to believe it's the same city in many respects! :(

Cruises Hotel

Image

Cannock's Department Store (Never seen a shot from this angle before!)

Image

Cannock's & McBirney's Department Stores

Image

O'Connell Street from Cecil Street junction

Image

Old Augustinian Church on O'Connell Street

Image
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby Tuborg » Tue Mar 16, 2010 3:00 pm

A couple more...


Rutland Street & Patrick Street

Image

The Crescent

Image

Munster & Leinster bank, The Medical Hall & Royal George Hotel

Image

O'Connell Street, from above Cecil Street

Image
Tuborg
Senior Member
 
Posts: 753
Joined: Wed Jun 01, 2005 3:07 am

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby bjg » Tue Mar 16, 2010 11:03 pm

Tuborg: could you possibly zoom in on the area above Baal's Bridge in the first and fourth of your aerial photos, and post the results? There is some detail of interest to me in my continuing search for information about the Limerick Navigation. Thanks in advance.

bjg
bjg
Member
 
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Feb 15, 2010 11:05 am

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Sun Apr 04, 2010 2:05 pm

  • Bygone Limerick ~ Hugh Oram (The City and County in Days Gone by ) 9781856356794
  • The Battle for Limerick City ~ Padraig Og O Ruairc (Military History of the Irish Civil War series) 9781856356756


Two more new historical books out soon, which should provide interesting photo material of Limerick circa 90-100 years ago. :)

An Irishman's Diary Irish Times

Hugh Oram

IT ALL BEGAN with an almost throwaway remark by George Stacpoole, the antiques specialist from Adare, Co Limerick. He’s the head of the Irish Antique Dealers Association and I’ve known him for years. One day, he said to me that he had lots of old photographs of Adare, suggesting they might make a book.

Simple as that, the beginnings of a long quest that is finally completed, with the publication due in April of my next book, Bygone Limerick , with many photographs taken 100 years ago. I’ve known and written about Limerick, city and county, for years, but researching this book introduced me to wonderful people I’d never met previously and I heard many intriguing stories.

I soon discovered a veritable network of people, each a passionate expert on the history of their own locality: John Cussen from Newcastle West; John Harrold from Bruree; Noel Collins from Kilmallock; Tony Browne from Limerick city; Tom Keogh of the city museum, with his personal collections of thousands of old picture postcards; Frank O’Connor, an expert on Limerick’s postal history; Michael F O’Sullivan, the creamery historian from Hospital; Fr Mark Tierney, that prodigious historian from Glenstal, and Vincent Browne, a thoroughly unlikely altar boy :p in his native Broadford, Co Limerick.

Introductions to other people were equally rewarding. From Lady Vivienne Lillingston of Kilmallock, I found that her husband, Allan, rode a one-eyed horse called Winning Fair, to victory in the Cheltenham Champion Hurdle in 1963.

Other curious historical facts came to light from the time of the War of Independence and Civil War. I was told about Tomás Malone, whose nom de guerre was Seán Ford, head of the old IRA in east Limerick. He was able to travel around the county with impunity, never discovered, because he was good friends with a judge, O’Callaghan Westropp, who had an Armstrong-Siddeley car with a capacious boot. He was never asked to open it for inspection.

Peter Tait, commemorated by the Tait Memorial Clock in Limerick city centre, had extraordinary business achievements in Limerick. He arrived in the city in the early 19th century from his native Shetland Islands as a penniless orphan and he began his career in the city as a pedlar. He went on to invent the notion of mass production clothes, with the same principles that Henry Ford applied to car production. This notion made Tait a fortune.

The last business venture in his life was a cigarette factory in northern Greece, which failed. His life ended, almost penniless, in a desolate hotel room in what was then southern Russia, now part of Georgia.

On the contemporary side, Denis Leonard, the driving force behind the Limerick Civic Trust, was enormously encouraging as soon as I approached him. The trust has done much restoration in Limerick in recent years. Sadly, he died at a comparatively young age, at the end of last year.

I also discovered all about Seán Ó Riada’s father, who was the garda sergeant in Adare for 28 years. At weekends, when he went to sit on a wall at the top of the town at 2.30am, all the local publicans knew it was time to shut up shop. During the week, he used a special knock on the doors of local pubs late at night; 20 minutes later, he would go in and find the place miraculously empty. Adare never had any “found-ons” in his time!

Another great personality I unearthed was John Enright, who made fishing rods in Castleconnell, just outside Limerick city. In the late 19th century, the runs of salmon on the Shannon at Castleconnell were vast and the Enright rods were so well regarded around the world that Tsar Nicholas II of Russia once declared that he would use none other. The opening of the Ardnacrusha hydro-electric dam and power station on the Shannon in 1929 finished the glory days of fishing at Castleconnell.

Just over a decade later, the ferry across the Shannon here ended when a bridge was built; I found that one of the ferrymen became blind in later life, but was able to navigate the Shannon with unerring accuracy.

Someone else I heard much about was the late Tommy Bowen, who by day worked in a hardware shop in Kilmallock. He was a walking encyclopedia of genealogical and historical information about the medieval town and did much to keep the town museum going.

The places, too, that came up in my research were amazing: the old bacon factories in Limerick, the Cleeves dairy factories and the short-lived soviets in Limerick, Bruree and elsewhere. One day, a friend of mine in Dublin, Denis Bergin, asked me whether I’d heard of Limerick’s hanging gardens. I hadn’t, but soon found out that a Limerick banker, William Roche, in the early 19th century, had constructed vast roof-top hanging gardens in the centre of the city that were the talk of the populace. I also discovered that Roche had managed to survive the great banking crash of 1820, an event which surely proves that much history merely runs in an endless loop.

Of all the century-old photographs used in the book, those that most captured my imagination were those of Adare and all its thatched cottages.

The streets are absolutely deserted, not a car in sight, just the odd pony and trap. For anyone who has done what I’ve done recently, driven through Adare to try to find a parking space, it was a salutary lesson.

Bygone Limerick is published by Mercier Press, Cork, next month.
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby CologneMike » Tue Dec 13, 2011 11:47 pm

Image

Old Bear Inn ~ 1640

Reminiscences of old Limerick by Ernest H. Bennis, 1951Book

Broad Street, once a leading and prosperous thoroughfare, contains a well chiselled archway, formerly the entrance to the “Old Bear Inn”, having on the keystone the inscription “Pierse Creagh 1640, rebuilt by John Creagh 1767”.

Image
User avatar
CologneMike
Old Master
 
Posts: 1146
Joined: Sun Apr 16, 2006 3:24 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Wed Dec 14, 2011 10:12 pm

Looking at those pictures is heartbreaking, to say the least. Everybody still alive who ever sat on Limerick City Council should be shot.
rumpelstiltskin
Member
 
Posts: 234
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2009 6:51 pm

Re: old illustrations of limerick

Postby jimg » Thu Jan 05, 2012 9:54 pm

Griff wrote:the very excellent Historic Towns Atlas - Limerick

Yes it is - worth every penny. They have them in Hodges Figgis.
jimg
Member
 
Posts: 480
Joined: Mon Nov 22, 2004 9:07 pm
Location: Zürich

PreviousNext

Return to Ireland