New Developments in Galway City

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby BTH » Sun Nov 09, 2008 2:51 am

Thank god they aren't building it outside the city - Galway has mercifully escaped the draining effect of out of town retail developments up until now. The main reason it's taken so long for this scheme to be granted is that they have had to make various proposals for improvements to the Headford Rd. roundabout/bottleneck before coming up with an acceptable and potentiallly successful solution. And really it cant possibly become any more of a nightmare for traffic than it already is!! Can it?

Now the city council just need to get on with their Local area plan for the opposite side of the Headford Rd. - where the horrors that are the Galway Retail Park, Black Box theatre and Omniplex cinema currently reside. The intention is that this area will become an extension of the city centre with a proper street pattern and mixed development as well as opportunities to develop areas of the waterside at Dyke Rd. Of course just about anything would be an improvement on it's current state!
BTH
Member
 
Posts: 260
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 1999 1:00 am
Location: Galway

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby rob mc » Sun Nov 09, 2008 5:08 pm

On another note the new coach station has been completed

Image

Dont know what they were thinking tho,putting only 8 bus terminals in it!!
Only in Ireland!!
rob mc
Member
 
Posts: 146
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:56 pm
Location: Galway

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby rob mc » Wed Feb 11, 2009 6:07 pm

Proposed 5th bridge over river corrib.

Image

The outer bypass is supposedly set to start immediately,as funding has been received and planning has been approved for a 15 km stretch of dual carriageway.

Whats everyones view on the outer bypass??

Good idea? bad idea?
rob mc
Member
 
Posts: 146
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:56 pm
Location: Galway

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby rob mc » Sat Mar 07, 2009 8:08 pm

A €350 million development plan for Galway harbour aims to move the port south on land reclaimed from Galway Bay.

The project aims to attract cruise liners into a transformed deepwater port, develop a new rail link and build up to 300 marina berths.

An “iconic” structure marking the port from sea approaches will be commissioned as part of the three-phase development, according to Galway Harbour Company.

Significantly, the harbour company intends to work with CIÉ on redeveloping the existing harbour area, and a local area action plan will be initiated as part of this, it says.

The three-phase plan has been prepared in advance of Galway’s hosting the first Irish stop-over for the Volvo Ocean Race. The Government has committed €8 million to Galway’s Volvo participation, and the event is expected to attracted 140,000 spectators and a worldwide television audience, with a prospective spend of over €40 million during the fortnight from May 23rd to June 6th.

However, no State funds are anticipated for the harbour project, which aims to qualify for strategic infrastructure approval with Bord Pleanála. Some 99 per cent of the new port will be built on reclaimed land and it is “vital” for Galway’s future, the company’s chief executive Eamon Bradshaw says.

First phase from 2010 to 2013 will involve reclamation using dredged material, building a new quay wall, the development of an extended rail link, the provision of new fishing berths and the development of a 177-berth marina.

The second phase will involve completing the marina and fishing berths, and building a new nautical centre and harbour office between 2013 and 2015. The final phase will involve providing an eastern marina with 110 berths, constructing public promenades to the east and west of the development and landscaping.

Inshore fishermen have been consulted, and initial talks have taken place with a number of stakeholders, the company says. It aims to fund the development through disposal of some of its existing portfolio, and it says it has already received Cabinet approval in principal.

The plan refines an initial €2 billion strategy presented in August 2006 to former taoiseach Bertie Ahern by a “vision” group set up for the port. This focused on moving the existing tidal port to deepwater, and was marketed as a “flagship” project for the west for the 2007-2013 national development plan.

However, An Taisce’s Galway branch was critical of lack of consultation, and said an overall plan for Galway docks was already a requirement in the Galway City Council development strategy.

Last year, Minister for Transport Noel Dempsey published a Harbours (Amendment) Bill 2008 to permit the 10 State port companies to pursue a “robust commercial agenda” both in and outside the State and boost their commercial mandate.

Irish Times
rob mc
Member
 
Posts: 146
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:56 pm
Location: Galway

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby dave123 » Wed Mar 25, 2009 4:35 am

galwayrush wrote:It's approx 102,000 within a 15 KM radius of the city.
Still a small place though.



The city and metropolitican region is 72,000 under CSO. Stop "but it's"......... it's 72,000 the city and suburbs. I'm not including county Galway and nor should you start including other regions. We are talking about Galway city not surrounding countryside 10/15miles outside it.
dave123
Senior Member
 
Posts: 511
Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2005 11:54 am
Location: Co. Dublin

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby rob mc » Thu Oct 01, 2009 1:20 pm

Up to three hundred jobs for NUIG construction project
Galway Advertiser, October 01, 2009.

By Richie Mccarthy

The Taoiseach Brian Cowen visited NUI Galway last Friday for a sod turning ceremony to mark the construction of a new €40m engineering building. The construction project will employ up to 300 people and is due for completion by September 2011. BAM Building Ltd has been signed as the main contractor for what will be one of the largest construction projects west of the Shannon, and on completion will be the largest engineering building in the country.

Speaking at NUI Galway, An Taoiseach said: “The new engineering building will be financed through a combination of exchequer funding and resources realised by NUI Galway, including philanthropy. The new building will bring benefits to Galway city and its surrounds by creating jobs for the next two years. Longer term it will enable NUI Galway to continue to produce excellent engineering graduates supporting the Smart Economy in areas such as innovation and renewable energy technologies”.

NUI Galway has recently seen soaring engineering programme applications which reflect favourably on carefully thought-out new programmes. These include energy systems engineering, designed in response to a growing demand for professional engineers to work in the energy sector. Another new course is engineering innovation, which aims to create a new type of electronic engineer with skills in innovation and entrepreneurship essential to delivering the smart economy.

The 14,200 square metre engineering building will accommodate the college of engineering and informatics, housing 110 staff and approximately 1,100 students. It will include green-building initiatives, and with its exposed construction design will itself be utilised as a teaching tool for the students. High-tech renewable energy systems, environmentally friendly heat generation using carbon-neutral biomass, rainwater recycling, ground source heat pump, and low-embodied energy construction materials wherever possible will underpin the building's green credentials and provide working examples for engineering students to study.

President of NUI Galway Dr James J Browne said: “This new engineering building reflects our commitment to providing students with the highest quality learning experience in engineering education. NUI Galway enjoys a strong reputation in engineering, evidenced by this year's increase in undergraduate engineering entry to over 250 students - a 25 per cent increase on the previous year. This approach to education at NUI Galway is based on the university's key research strengths and our strong linkage with industrial partners. We offer a range of innovative programmes - from biomedical to energy engineering - which highlight the university's commitment to the national and regional needs of the smart economy”.
rob mc
Member
 
Posts: 146
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:56 pm
Location: Galway

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby rob mc » Thu Jan 14, 2010 7:35 pm

This looks promising.

Councils hope ambitious plan will change the way Galway travels

Galway Advertiser, January 14, 2010.

By Kernan Andrews

A major bid to make Galway the leading Smart Travel location in the country by the Galway City Council and Galway County Council could see car use reduced dramatically over the next five years and see a major rise in cycling, walking, and the use of public transport.

For all this to become a reality, an ambitious plan, which the local authorities have assembled, must be approved for Government funding.

The city and county councils’ joint submission to the Government’s Smarter Travel National Competition, which seeks to achieve sustainable transport systems and practices for Ireland, has reached the second stage.

Originally 39 applications were made for the funding for a share of the €50 million fund the Government is offering. These have now been whittled down to 11 of which the Galway bid is one.

Feedback from the Department of Transport on the city and county councils’ Stage One bid highlighted that it was “excellent” and “one of the few bids where all members of the adjudication panel agreed that it should proceed to stage II”.

The stage II bid seeks to secure funding of €25 million for the Galway Metropolitan Area (Galway city, Bearna, Oranmore, and Baile Chlair). The bid outlines an ambitious plan for the city including major infrastructural works, plans, and programmes aimed at increasing the numbers of walkers, cyclists, and public transport users.

The completed bid must be submitted by April 30. If this bid is successful it will reach the final stage of four and stand in good stead of securing all or a majority of the funding being sought.

The plan proposes to increase the pedestrian areas of Galway city into Cross Street, Middle Street, and Eglinton Street. The proposal came from consultations which took place before Christmas and the council will be meeting with retailers, councillors, the Chamber of Commerce, etc, to gain further points of view and suggestions on this idea.

According to Cathy Joyce of the Galway Transportation Unit the idea has already been “very well received” in meetings held so far with the Galway City Business Association and the Chamber of Commerce.

A major thrust of the bid is to reduce car use by 15 per cent by 2014 and encourage cycling, walking, and the use of public transport. As a result it is proposed to reduce speed limits in the city centre to 30kph.

“There is a need to look at the safety of all road users, not just drivers,” said Joe Tansey, head of the Galway Transportation Unit. “Cyclists and pedestrians will see this as vital to promoting cycling and walking, and reducing speeds will protect more vulnerable road users. Speeding drivers are a deterrent to pedestrians and to parents letting children cycle to school.”

Other proposals to reduce car use include a six fold increase in the length of bus corridors from 3km to 18km, to serve Knocknacarra, Parkmore, Oranmore, Monivea Road and the Tuam Road; and the development of a new walking and cycling route from Newtownsmith to the Docks via Abbeygate Street.

To encourage cycling, the plan seeks the development of high quality cycle routes from the city centre to Bearna, Dangan, Baile-Chlair, and Oranmore. It also proposes two new bike training parks in the east and west of the city.

According to Mr Tansey, the parks will be a kind of road safety training park for cyclists. While all cyclists will be welcome to use the facilities, they will be primarily aimed at young cyclists and families as well as new adult cyclists who may be nervous of the roads. The park will be a mock-up streetscape with various obstacles, and a volunteer instructor will be on-hand to give advice and training.

A total of four new bridges have been proposed. Two will be pedestrian bridges - one over the old Clifden-Galway railway on the River Corrib and another from the Cathedral to Bowling Green.

A key part of the plan will be the development of a multi-modal transport hub in Garraun, Oranmore, which will include park and ride facilities, a rail station, and cycling and walking felicities. The scheme will also provide local employment.

For such a plan to be successful the public need to see the local authorities deliver on their promises. Correspondingly the public to come on board and be willing to adopt new ways of getting around the city that do not exclusively involve the car.

As a result the bid proposes a new ‘sustainable travel’ PR programme and the roll out of workplace mobility plans, which will involve City Hall working with businesses which employ more than 100 people and focusing on prioritising cycling and walking to work, car pooling, and using public transport.

The council also intends to develop a new personalised travel planning programme to be piloted in Renmore. This will see City Hall discussing with the Renmore population the ways in which local people travel to work, school, and leisure activities, and seeing how car use can be reduced in this.

“We’re all creatures of habit,” said Mr Tansey. “We want to make people aware of the options that are out there. It gives people the chance to do something new and find something that might suit them.”

Fianna Fáil councillor and chairman of the Integrated Transportation Coordinating Group Michael J Crowe said the bid “is a very comprehensive plan” and will need “widespread support” for it to succeed, and he is calling on the public, councillors, and various interested groups to get behind it.

“We have stiff opposition from Cork, Limerick, and parts of Dublin city, among others,” he said. “As well as trying to secure €25 million, advancing the necessary infrastructural changes, and promoting the benefits, etc, we also need to change the public’s hearts and minds. It is an uphill challenge but one I believe is achievable.”

The Galway Metropolitan Area Stage II bid will bew assessed by reference to its level of ambition, designs, behavioural change campaigns, and the ability of the city and country councils to deliver on their plans.

“We are entering this on a high note but what will make the difference to actually securing the funding is the
rob mc
Member
 
Posts: 146
Joined: Fri Dec 01, 2006 8:56 pm
Location: Galway

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby Solo » Fri Feb 05, 2010 3:30 am

kingpin976 wrote:Douglas Wallace were not the architects responsible for the Bailey Point development in Galway. The architect responsible was actually Architectural Design Technology. Douglas Wallace were employed in the latter stages of the project by the developer and then, following the developer going into receivership, by the receiver KPMG. Douglas Wallace’s brief in both instances was to resolve both planning compliance and legal ownership/certification issues.


Hi Kingpin,

May I correct you on this post I realise it is an old one but it needs correcting. The Architect responsible was a company called Architectural Construction Technology based in Dun Laoghaire. Douglas Wallace were only employed after the original Architect refused to continue working because the Cunningham Group who were backed by the First Active bank at the time owed around €500,000.00 and had bounced cheques. Douglas Wallace were not brought in to clean up the project they were brought in in an attempt to finish the project without paying the Original Architect. Douglas Wallace to their shame made use of misappropriated files belong to Architectural Construction Technology altered those drawings and then in public documentation claimed that they did them.

The Original Architect still has thousands of documents for this project and I understand that a number of years ago after the First Active had put the Cunningham into receivership they did a deal with A.C. T. but reneged on that deal. As a result the title to the building is in dispute as A.C.T. owns almost all of the planning and fire permissions and has all of the original drawings files.

So if I may be so bold you should perhaps not speak of things that it is clear you know nothing about
Solo
Member
 
Posts: 77
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:41 am

Re: New Developments in Galway City

Postby Solo » Fri Feb 05, 2010 3:36 am

Quote:
Originally Posted by BTH
Here is the Bailey Point building in Salthill by Douglas Wallace (designed many many years ago I believe!). It should have opened about 3 years ago but has been beset by problems from the start. It will eventually accommodate a multi screen cinema in the basement, bar, restaurant, nightclub and lots and lots of apartments. I'd say the view from those penthouses is pretty amazing!

Yes the view is amazing. But see my reply to Kingpin as Douglas Wallace did not design this building nor were they brought in to clean up problems. They were brought in to circumvent paying the original Architects who were Architectural Construction Technology. The only problems were the developer did not like paying the people involved in the project not just the Architects but many other suppliers had considerable difficulty getting paid and many did not get paid.
Solo
Member
 
Posts: 77
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:41 am

Previous

Return to Ireland



cron