T-plan barn style churches

T-plan barn style churches

Postby fifilarue » Wed Dec 09, 2009 3:54 pm

Hello All,
Am new here so apologies if this is not the appropriate forum. I am looking for some reference material for T-plan, barn style churches dating to early nineteenth century. Could anybody help?
Thanks in advance.
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:31 pm

fifilarue wrote:Hello All,
Am new here so apologies if this is not the appropriate forum. I am looking for some reference material for T-plan, barn style churches dating to early nineteenth century. Could anybody help?
Thanks in advance.


Try thread on Michael Augustine Riordan: examples would be Dunmanway, Skibereen, Kinsale (St John the Baptist) - also Mallow which may or may not be by MAO'R. These are all Palladian and date from 1825-1840. Fermoy (St. Patrick's) was originally rectangular but was enlarged in 1842 by the addition of transepts making it T shaped (chancel, added in 1880s making it cruciform).

Also, see Buttevant (St. Mary's) by Charles Cottrell, neo-Gothic 1832, St John the Baptist Killeagh neo Gothic 1859, Castlemagner neo-Gothic 1969, St Matrin's Kilworth c.1790, .

You may also wish to take a look at the ground plan for Cobh Cathedral.

Numerous early vernacular structures throughout the 19th century such as St Catherine's Conna, St Catherine's Glengaura, St Joseph's Fornaught, St Lachteens Grenagh, St Bartholomew's Kildorrery, St Michael's Freemount, St Joseph's Killacluig .

There is a theory that this form derives from Ulster Presbyterian influences. However, you may want to take a look at the Lateran Basilica in Rome and San Lorenzo and Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence.
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby fifilarue » Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:52 pm

Praxiteles wrote:Try thread on Michael Augustine Riordan: examples would be Dunmanway, Skibereen, Kinsale (St John the Baptist) - also Mallow which may or may not be by MAO'R. These are all Palladian and date from 1825-1840. Fermoy (St. Patrick's) was originally rectangular but was enlarged in 1842 by the addition of transepts making it T shaped (chancel, added in 1880s making it cruciform).

Also, see Buttevant (St. Mary's) by Charles Cottrell, neo-Gothic 1832, St John the Baptist Killeagh neo Gothic 1859, Castlemagner neo-Gothic 1969, St Matrin's Kilworth c.1790, .

You may also wish to take a look at the ground plan for Cobh Cathedral.

Numerous early vernacular structures throughout the 19th century such as St Catherine's Conna, St Catherine's Glengaura, St Joseph's Fornaught, St Lachteens Grenagh, St Bartholomew's Kildorrery, St Michael's Freemount, St Joseph's Killacluig .

There is a theory that this form derives from Ulster Presbyterian influences. However, you may want to take a look at the Lateran Basilica in Rome and San Lorenzo and Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence.


Thanks a million. Am particularly interested in origins of form so appreciate the references. The church I am researching is thought to date to between 1810-1815, so it must be a very early example?
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Dec 09, 2009 7:25 pm

Brunelleschi's ground plan for San Lorenzo in Florence 1420-1435


Image
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Dec 09, 2009 7:31 pm

Santa Maria Novella, Florence

Image
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Dec 09, 2009 7:58 pm

Other Italian examples are.

1. The Upper and Lower Basilicas at Assissi (1228-1253)

2. Santa Croce in Florence by Arnolfo di Cambio (1295)

3. San Fresco in Messina (1254)

4. Orvieto Cathedral ? (1290)

5. Projected plans for the Duomo di Siena -never executed

6. Ss. Giovanni e Paolo in Venice 1330

7. San Nicolo in Treviso (1303)

8. Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari in Venice 1330


It is perhaps worth noting that most of the churches mentioned above are connected with the mendican orders, especially teh Franciscans and the Dominicans.
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Dec 09, 2009 8:03 pm

In the Romanesque period:

Sant'Isodoro de Leon in Spain


Image

Possibly, the Cathedral of Speyer

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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby fifilarue » Wed Dec 09, 2009 9:44 pm

Praxiteles-thanks a million for all this-am familiar with the Italian examples but had not made the connection with my little country church! Coincidentally, it is located adjacent to the ruins of a Franciscan priory.
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby Praxiteles » Wed Dec 09, 2009 11:08 pm

fifilarue wrote:Praxiteles-thanks a million for all this-am familiar with the Italian examples but had not made the connection with my little country church! Coincidentally, it is located adjacent to the ruins of a Franciscan priory.


At the dissolution there were some 63 Franciscan houses in Ireland. Parish churches were subsequently built in the 19th century near to the ruins of these in only 5 or 6 cases in the entire country!
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby trace » Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:18 am

You should have a proper look at Chapter IV: The Theatre in the Barn of Niall McCullough + Valerie Mulvin's A Lost Tradition: The Nature of Architecture in Ireland, published by Gandon Editions in 1987. Good stuff, with pics and plans!
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Re: T-plan barn style churches

Postby fifilarue » Thu Dec 10, 2009 12:02 pm

trace wrote:You should have a proper look at Chapter IV: The Theatre in the Barn of Niall McCullough + Valerie Mulvin's A Lost Tradition: The Nature of Architecture in Ireland, published by Gandon Editions in 1987. Good stuff, with pics and plans!


Many thanks trace, will check it out.
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