St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby missarchi » Fri Nov 13, 2009 2:44 am

If I lived in this area which I once did I would want bars as well...
but then they climb onto the first floor...
they need razor wire on top and steel re-enforced front doors...

I blame planning regulations > car parking > disabled access for all apartments > toilet on entry level > fire regulations > lifts ect...

it is possible to do better but its only possible to do a lot better if some of the nonsense is fixed...

graham is on the mark but its very hard to do in Ireland if you want 5 stories...
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby jesus_o_murchu » Sat Nov 14, 2009 11:36 pm

Very interesting discussion. Could somebody perhaps clarify something for me. As far as I am aware this building was granted permission to be built for residential use. It is currently being used as an apart-hotel. (I heard that the apart-hotel company took a lease out on all the units well before it was completed). Does the material change of use not make this building in its current state illegal? I tried to check the planning file a while back and couldnt find any reference to a change of use from the original grant of permission for residential apartments. Nor could I get through to the case officer in DCC to find out its status.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby StephenC » Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:04 pm

The building is not illegal given that it was developed subject to a grant of planning permission. However the use is unauthorised unless it is as a result of a subsequent permission.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby StephenC » Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:09 pm

This is a bread and butter issue for the city is it not. All the fancy plans and strategies such as Soho (which related to this part of the city but of course faded into memory somewhere) will be to no avail unless these fundamental problems can be solved. Unfortunately this kind of thing is all to common in the city. See Forbes Street off Amiens St as an example of this with 10 years dirt allied. Apartments around Gardiner Street and Cathal Brugha Street as well.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby lostexpectation » Mon Nov 16, 2009 2:02 pm

the building has 'a shallow loggia', i suggest it has a transparent boundary, ie small wall, it also has different paving, and we can't do steps, so all you'd like is the railings removed grahamh, :P seems the only possible option of what you've brought up, you argue the railings isn't need for security.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby Devin » Tue Dec 01, 2009 1:20 pm

GrahamH wrote:What on earth is going on here? This is supposed to be a street?

Image

Sorry, I haven't read the rest of the thread yet, but this is a rhetorical question, isn't it? Everyone knows the answer: shitheads. ASB. Feral youth. 'Underclass'. It's not Churchtown. Can't leave residential panes of glass onto the street around here. Winter Garden, Pearse Street learnt the hard way. We like to smash things. If we can't rob it we'll smash it. Gratuitous damage to property. Boiling rage. The continental model of public/semi-private/private urban space is not a runner in Dublin city centre yet. So the ground floor is caged in. Italia '90 & '94 lovechilds wreckin the place.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby Livian » Sat Dec 05, 2009 5:11 pm

Devin wrote:Sorry, I haven't read the rest of the thread yet, but this is a rhetorical question, isn't it? Everyone knows the answer: shitheads. ASB. Feral youth. 'Underclass'. It's not Churchtown. Can't leave residential panes of glass onto the street around here. Winter Garden, Pearse Street learnt the hard way. We like to smash things. If we can't rob it we'll smash it. Gratuitous damage to property. Boiling rage. The continental model of public/semi-private/private urban space is not a runner in Dublin city centre yet. So the ground floor is caged in. Italia '90 & '94 lovechilds wreckin the place.


One of the photos in the first post includes the end of the street that the developer did not get his hands on. This shows terraced houses with direct access from the street. Dublin 8 has lots of houses with residential panes of glass onto the street.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby Devin » Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:42 am

It's not meant to be taken so literally, Livian. It's just a verbal picture. Gougers do prefer to smash new things, though. Particular resent is shown towards new buildings in inner city areas for some reason.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby Global Citizen » Mon Dec 07, 2009 7:37 am

Vandals vandalising the vandalism.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby Smithfield Resi » Thu Dec 10, 2009 8:57 pm

..not to bypass the architectual here, but to have a little moan in relation to those no entry signs which appeared once this was complete.

It used to be possible to access the quays from this street (and from the bottom of Bridgefoot St now similarly blocked) to cross the liffey to travel to the Northside. As a result of this example of DCCs job lot of no entry and no left turn signs, any traffic coming from James St/Thomas Street has to travel as far as High St (either past this development or down Thomas St) and across the liffey at to Church St.

To give an example of the impact of this, a journey I make (occasionally) that used to take 5 mins (Guinness to Smithfield - down Bridgfoot St, jink around onto the quays, across at Calatrava, Blackhall Place - Queen St.) now takes 30 minutes in rush hour - with my car now contributing to the horrible congestion on High/Church St.

Any sense in actually allowing traffic down here again as a feeder to the quays (put a synched traffic light at the end)?
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby GrahamH » Thu Dec 10, 2009 9:54 pm

But what of the street's residents and their Parisian courtyard oasis?! Have you so much as a bone of consideration, Smithfield Resi?

Having played dodgems with half a dozen cars and buses availing of Dame Street's cycle lanes today, I nearly blew my top with a northie, with typical blonde trophy wife in tow, parked in the cycle lane on Christchurch Place as he wandered around carefree with hands in pockets. His resultant hesitant asking as to the whereabouts of the St. Augustine apartments was needless to say a red flag to a bull. Until I realised what was in store for him. And I happily told him where they were.
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Re: St. Augustine rolling in his grave...

Postby jesus_o_murchu » Fri Jan 22, 2010 10:54 am

lostexpectation wrote:the building has 'a shallow loggia', i suggest it has a transparent boundary, ie small wall, it also has different paving, and we can't do steps, so all you'd like is the railings removed grahamh, :P seems the only possible option of what you've brought up, you argue the railings isn't need for security.


Example of the shallow loggia seen recently in high density suburbia (donaghmede/north fringe):
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