Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Re: Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Postby gunter » Wed Nov 11, 2009 9:38 am

Do you guys refuse to read back on threads?

''Search for 'small bang' designs for inner city''
[INDENT]17 groups of architects and architecture students have been asked to design replacement residential buildings based on individual plots of former Georgian houses on Dominick Street . . . .
City architect Ali Grehan said the competition resulted from concern about the poor design quality of many “infill” schemes for former Georgian plots in the inner city . . . “Some developments in the historic core over the last 10 years have been out of scale with their plot size . . . . and it has resulted in a loss of rhythm of the streetscape.”

The council was not seeking a pastiche replacement of Georgian Dublin, but it should be possible to insert contemporary buildings that respected the Georgian streetscape, Ms Grehan said.

“We have to keep the door open on every option for the city, but we’ve had the ‘big bang’ large chunk development, so maybe it’s time to look at incremental development – the smaller bang.”
[/INDENT]
This event happened three or four weeks ago. It souned like a brilliant idea, . . . . a worthwhile exercise to build on the Henrietta Street competition initiative of last year.

I was just wondering if anyone had any more information on it,

. . . . . I should have known better :rolleyes:
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Re: Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Postby missarchi » Wed Nov 11, 2009 11:36 am

I'm sick of small bangs I want big bangs
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Re: Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Postby wearnicehats » Wed Nov 11, 2009 2:05 pm

gunter wrote:Image

Any feedback on this? . . . . . or does gunter have to go to every single event

This could have been a really worthy exercise, if it generated debate about alternatives to the urban regeneration models we've been using up to now, but if the information doesn't filter out into the wider community, it's not going to generate much excitement!

There were a couple of photos on the Architecture Foundation website, but even these focused mostly on the participants, rather than the actual work and, God help it, for all it's interactive aspirations, the IAF website is like watching trendy paint dry.


i thought this was by private invitation only
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Re: Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Postby what? » Fri Nov 13, 2009 3:11 pm

what?
 
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Re: Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Postby gunter » Fri Nov 13, 2009 8:17 pm

Thanks for posting that Richview link what?

. . . . . but, at the risk of going over old ground again, . . . . in terms of architectural communication, exactly what information does that convey?

Ok we know the kids had some fun with glue, but what were the ideas?

Did anyone come up with any new in-fill typologies?

Is the lift access block still the only way to address Part M?

Are we still relying on the same mix of miserable balconies and remote roof terraces, for amenity open space?

What have they done with Ali?
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Re: Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Postby missarchi » Fri Nov 13, 2009 8:38 pm

what? were any of the building regulations challenged? for this small banger...
or was it more about the "pastiche journey" modernity is pastiche...

what is modernity?

Would it be good to make a book about banned international terrace house types in Ireland?
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Re: Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Postby jesus_o_murchu » Sat Nov 14, 2009 11:12 pm

Excerpt from Frank McDonald's article in the Irish Times from October 22nd:

Denis Byrne himself was in Smithfield on Saturday, where he was one of the adjudicators for a day-long competition to design new living spaces on a city council site at Lower Dominick Street, in response to an informal brief by Ali Grehan.

“The general thought was about how people could live there, rather than a geometric exercise,” she said.

Seventeen teams of young architects and students took part in the competition, drawing up plans and making models in a vacant retail unit on the corner of Haymarket.

According to Alice Clancy, of Now What?, passers-by were really intrigued by all the activity: “What’s going on in there? Why is everyone working so hard?” they asked.

Outside, a flashing digital sign posed the provocative question, “What is the spirit of gracious living anyway?”. It prompted more questions about the role of architects in Irish society and led to discussions about the need for collaboration with engineers, planners and artists, with older and younger generations working together, Clancy said.

“We thought originally Now What? was going to be a summer thing. But everyone involved was so dedicated that it became something else.

“It also showed that there’s a need for a workshop like this in the city – more rough than Darc, a place that would allow people to experiment with art, photography, architecture and design.”

The Dominick Street competition, for prizes of books rather than actual commissions, was jointly won by architects Michael Pike and Grace Keeley, who produced an exquisite model in balsawood, and three fourth year students from DIT School of Architecture in Bolton Street: Jamie Conway, Cormac Nolan and Elizabeth Gaynor.

More remarkable perhaps was that the runners-up were three Italians (Gessica Cozi, Federico Scoponi and Luca Trufarelli), only one of whom is an architect – and they had heard about the competition on the grapevine.

Their project dealt with the grain of the city, instead of concentrating, as others did, on the design of an individual plot.
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Re: Georgian infilling in Dublin.

Postby Devin » Mon Nov 16, 2009 2:35 pm

One of the problems with developing individual plots during the Celtic Tiger was that the quality suffered. There are a number of examples of this on Meath Street, Dublin 8; perfectly fine units of development on traditional building plots in a loosely contemporary style but the materials and finishes are unfortunately cheap looking, Collectively we lost interest in small scale repair of the city during boom and, when it was done, hearts were not in it.

The returns from a 4-floor building on an old plot seemed to just lose their appeal when there was a flashy 9-floor glass & titanium monster to be built providing 8,675 sqm of net lettable.
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