Trinity College Dublin

Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:58 pm

. . . and yes the Long Room Hub is going on site this month.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Cathal Dunne » Tue Jun 09, 2009 4:46 pm

notjim wrote:. . . and yes the Long Room Hub is going on site this month.


So they are building that edifice over the Ed Burke Hall this Summer? It's an ideal time to do it since the noise of the building work would be quite distracting to lectures being held there once college comes back in September.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Tue Jun 09, 2009 5:52 pm

I think it will be March before its handed over, but hopefully the worst of the work effecting the Burke will be done.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Fri Jun 12, 2009 10:59 pm

How did it go through the planning process do we know? Any notable developments to make it worth wading through a planning search for?

What is this faux grass in aid of behind the cricket pitch, notjim? Oddly pleasant.

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The Trinity campus is seen to best effect on quiet weekend evenings in summer, when the intense heat and crowds of the day have receded, and the great buildings bask in contemplation in the last rays of low sunshine.

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The shadows become so long that you can see them moving before your eyes as they play across the soft stone surfaces.

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The glimpsed views of the campus are a constant delight.

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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Fri Jun 12, 2009 11:04 pm

The great entrance hall of Regent House fronting into College Green plays host to stunning plays of light on such evenings, as the sinking sun pierces its way down Dame Street, directly through the mid-18th century windows of the West Front, before coming to a halt on the opposing wall of the stairwell.

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The swirled patterns projected by the shimmering crown glass panes are a delight to behold.

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Which sadly is more than can be said for the presentation of the entrance hall itself, which is used as a dumping ground by college authorities. Can you just imagine a similar scene in Oxford or Cambridge?

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Some of the very finest ironwork in the city is forced to sit amongst - heck even give support to - this muck.

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Appalling. The decoration is also dismally down-at-heel.

One curiosity of this great room, however, is a little piece of hidden history which can be observed by those of the snooping variety. If you open up the shuttering of the windows at ground floor level, glimpses of forgotten newspaper padding can be noted the whole way along the inside of the window box.

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If you tug at it, it comes loose quite easily.

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Alas a date was not printed on the above piece and I did not want to damage it so popped it back in. Worth digging out though if anyone else wants a go. It would appear to date to the 1950s at the latest.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Fri Jun 12, 2009 11:59 pm

Beautiful pictures Graham.

I have often regretted the way that staircase is treated, I think the Regent Room, the room it leads up to, is wasted too, nothing like as grand, or as well used, a room as it could be. It could be one of the places we share with the city, it could be used for recitals and poetry readings and the like and it with a little effort it could look great and people would love it.

Compared to a Cambridge college we aren't good with great rooms; for example, there is a little meeting room by the Long Room, getting to it is cool because you walk through the Long Room and then beyond the tourists and the ropes and through the door at the end, but the room itself could be anywhere, fantastic windows sure, but crappy carpet, bad wiring, some half assed repro furniture.

Even the college board room is underwhelming.

The Common Room is good and the Provost's House, of course, is fantastic. However with just a little effort we could have so much more; I work in one of the houses on Westland Row, with the honorable exception of the new McNamara Professor of Engineering, we waste these buildings, with just a tiny bit of effort it could feel like a privilege to work in them.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby magwea » Sat Jun 13, 2009 12:06 pm

Great photos GrahamH

Its amazing how Trinity is completely emptied of people by the end of term.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Sat Jun 13, 2009 12:43 pm

magwea wrote:Its amazing how Trinity is completely emptied of people by the end of term.


I'm still here! I don't really feel it gets that much emptier. Now Cambridge between Christmas and New Years . . .
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby magwea » Sun Jun 14, 2009 12:54 am

Ah, there's always a few that never would leave the place.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Mon Jul 13, 2009 3:09 pm

So the Long Room Hub building is on site; they haven't done much yet but they are definitely clearing the site.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Cathal Dunne » Tue Jul 14, 2009 4:24 pm

notjim wrote:So the Long Room Hub building is on site; they haven't done much yet but they are definitely clearing the site.


Yes, I was in around there last Friday, the work has started. Nice bit of work for builders in these depressed times. Does anyone now when they are due to complete the Hub?
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Tue Jul 14, 2009 7:10 pm

I can't remember how long it is taking, but I remember being surprised by how quickly they were planning to do it. The Pav redevelopment is going on site this week as well.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Tue Jul 14, 2009 9:50 pm

What is the Pav development notjim?

Just as I pass every evening, it never fails to baffle how an educational institute with its own pioneering engineering faculty, hosting a number of noted lecturers and professors in the field of energy conservation, coupled with one of the finest art history departments in the state, can preside over the shambolic state of affairs that is the presentation of the iconic public face of Trinity College Dublin, namely the ever-decaying West Front on College Green.

We shall leave manicured turf and other contentious suburban-related issues outside the classroom for the moment, but the three issues currently facing the West Front are:

1) The despicable state of its windows, the lack of maintenance of which is a growing embarrassment in the heart of the city. For the flagship institution in the city and arguably its number one visited attraction (what visitor to Dublin does not pass through Trinity or College Green?) to have its fenestration-heavy facade compromised by windows in an advanced state of deterioration, and in some cases decay, is simply unacceptable. Even windows that were recently restored before the wider project ground to a halt are already grubby, having benefited from zero maintenance since the work was carried out. The entire array of windows on this prominent public face urgently needs restoration, and subsequent on-going maintenance. Cash is of course the accepted big stumbling block. If we had a lottery fund that actually worked, it would be the classic source of funding for a major project such as this.

2) Policy regarding the presentation of rooms fronting the West Front needs to be established. The facade is increasingly taking on the appearance of the city's most pretentious tenement block, with ragged curtains, old battered blinds and shutters, and various types of temporary coverings and secondary glazing cluttering the window opes. Likewise, while signs of academic life are interesting and animating for the passer-by, stacks of administrative junk and general abandoned materials, that nobody has a notion what to do with or knows who dumped there in the first place, most certainly are not. All of this unsightly rubbish needs to be cleared and consistently monitored. The presentation of the Grafton Street end pavilion is a particular disgrace.

3) The floodlighting (yes I know, off he goes again) of the West Front is simply shambolic and has been for years. Indeed it would appear that no routine maintenance of the lighting installation has been conducted since it was probably installed in the mid-1990s for the college's 500th anniversary, as part of the wider conservation works to the College Green facade undertaken at that time. What few and inadequate floods that there are mounted to the rear of the railing plinth wall are either blown, broken, or due to failed hinges misdirected at anything from the lawn to plinth the flood is attached to. As manicured as the grass may be, 800 watt-plus just might be better expended on highlighting the 18th century facade than exposing the nocturnal occupations of urban snails. Even more preposterously, a white flood was recently replaced with an orange sodium Phillips equivalent, with complete disregard for the existing (if barely) ensemble’s agreed colour temperature. The effect, on the few occasions the floods are even turned on at all, could not be more horrific. The engineering faculty should join forces with Phillips or the ESB or whoever to install the most energy efficient floodlighting system of any major building in the capital. The site, with its wide protected lawn and railing boundary, is the ideal arrangement for any floodlighting scheme, and also offers simple access for installation and maintenance. The type of aesthetic required – a simple ethereal glow of upward-cast white light from a hidden source - has long been the most effective solution for the expansive gracious West Front, making matters all the easier to implement if the will was there. Finally, those shocking grubby wonky 80s lanterns clinging for dear life to the piers of the entrance gates sorely need replacement. Two charming, well detailed reproduction lamps with glittering clear bulbs would be the icing on the cake of a newly invigorated West Front.

These issues just have to be sorted. As with many Irish institutions, Trinity for some reason doesn’t appear to hold an overt pride in dignity of appearance, or graciousness in its presentation to the world. The current misuse of Regent House, as mentioned by notjim earlier, is the classic example of such an attitude – a facility which could be a prestigious showcase for the college, ideally positioned on the interface between the institution and the city as host to innumerable public events.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Wed Jul 15, 2009 12:37 am

As well as agree with all of the above I can think of a thousand other instances of how the college is failing to look after its building stock: some day I want to start a TCD snag list of all the small and large things they could do to look after the place properly.

The Pav, the Pavilion bar on college park so beloved of students, the three or four sunny evenings they spend drinking there each April/May/June form 90% of their happy memories, is being extended, for the fourth time in its existence. As far as I understand it, glass boxes are being added on the podium areas each side of the bar and some arrangement is being made to improve disabled access.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Cathal Dunne » Wed Jul 15, 2009 12:47 pm

notjim wrote:
The Pav, the Pavilion bar on college park so beloved of students, the three or four sunny evenings they spend drinking there each April/May/June form 90% of their happy memories, is being extended, for the fourth time in its existence. As far as I understand it, glass boxes are being added on the podium areas each side of the bar and some arrangement is being made to improve disabled access.


They could also do with expanding the toilets in the place. The gents are shoebox-sized and you're always blocking the washbasin when drying your hands with the hand-dryer which can be a bit uncomfortable of a Pav Friday.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby lostexpectation » Thu Jul 16, 2009 12:08 am

fyi st patrick's well in tcd well photos/ discussions
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2055615605
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby GrahamH » Thu Jul 16, 2009 10:14 pm

Thanks for the link lostexpectation - most interesting! Good to see Trinity News's journalistic standards are as high as ever too, ripping text word for word from published sources.

I never heard of this well's survival before, perhaps because it is quite clearly not St. Patrick's Well of antiquity, or indeed even of late medieval times, which might otherwise promote a wider knowledge of its existence.

Rachel Moss's thoroughly researched and beautifully written history of the well in The Provost’s House Stables: Building and Environs, observes that by the 18th and 19th centuries there was a proliferation of wells in the Nassau Street district, all of which had competing claims to the title of St. Patrick's Well, even though it was more than likely originally located about half a kilometre away at Lincoln Place (the name St. Patrick's Well Lane alone suggests a positioning at a remove from the settlement of Trinity College and Hoggen Green). Thus the impressive brick-lined Georgian well which stands today immediately beneath the traffic junction with Dawson Street (RPA take note), albeit quite extravagant, is probably associated with the houses which once stood along this section of this side of the street, possibly accessed in a manner similar to a typical basement cellar with an entrance off a basement light well under the pavement. Alternatively. Rachel Moss suggests the well may be connected with the older Trinity stables which were also located in this area: the likely inferior quality of the water being acceptable for animal consumption.

In any event another Dublin curiosity to add to the list! I wonder what the entranceway was like before the tunnel was lined with concrete during the construction of the Arts Block. I suppose we should be thankful it was otherwise maintained...
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby kinsella » Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:24 pm

Look at the orbs in some of those photos in lostexpectation's link..............................'Most Haunted' anyone! (we could get Derek Acorah to connect with some of Trinity's more famous alumni) :rolleyes:
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Fri Jul 17, 2009 10:29 am

oh and work has begun on the scheme to replace some of the front square cobbles with paving to improve disabled access.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Frank Taylor » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:17 pm

notjim wrote:oh and work has begun on the scheme to replace some of the front square cobbles with paving to improve disabled access.
The idea was to lay some discrete flat granite tracks through the cobbles to allow for wheelchairs. This was promised enthusiastically in 1991 by Tom Mitchell while on the hustings to become provost. He was elected but several years later, I had to push my mother over the cobbles to my graduation. Anyway I'm glad it's finally happening.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Fri Jul 17, 2009 3:22 pm

I think both funding and planning permission proved more difficult than anticipated. Basically there will be a track around the edge and two perpendicular tracks cross the large expanse of cobbles. I am also glad it is happening, though I am unsure they have picked the right size of paving stone.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby notjim » Wed Jul 22, 2009 9:21 am

The path replacing part of the cobbles; these are samples apparently:

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(photo from boards.ie; the cobbles thread on the TCD board)
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby Frank Taylor » Wed Jul 22, 2009 1:54 pm

Why not use flags the same size and colour as the cobbles? This looks big enough to park a truck and shiny enough to use on a bathroom wall.

The stretcher bond pattern is badly mismatched with the cobble stones. Looks horrible to me. Still it's better than forcing invalids over bumpy stones.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby fergalr » Wed Jul 22, 2009 6:16 pm

Cathal Dunne wrote:They could also do with expanding the toilets in the place. The gents are shoebox-sized and you're always blocking the washbasin when drying your hands with the hand-dryer which can be a bit uncomfortable of a Pav Friday.


Listen, those aren't toilets. Those are water closets in the most closet sense of the word. I don't know why they don't boot the changing rooms out of the bottom of the building and use all that room for more bar space.
Ah, the Pav. Best pub in the world on a late summer's afternoon.
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Re: Trinity College Dublin

Postby marmajam » Wed Jul 22, 2009 7:21 pm

notjim wrote:The path replacing part of the cobbles; these are samples apparently:

Image

(photo from boards.ie; the cobbles thread on the TCD board)

contrast looks good I think
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