The Great 1930s Scheme

The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby GrahamH » Sat Nov 26, 2005 9:14 pm

Crumlin is a fascinating place. Its vast tracts of housing were built as the great hope for solving Dublin’s housing crisis of the early 20th century, but then went into a dark period about ten years later once the young, often disadvantaged families began to grow up, stigmatising the area, but now it is going through a revival of sorts as the population has mellowed and aged and the ‘troublesome’ generation dissipated, with new families now moving back into what are now highly desirable homes close to the city centre.

A lot has been written about the great Corporation schemes of the 1930s-60s, particularly the flat complexes, but not so much of the suburban housing constructed, and least still of their architecture. The book ‘Shaping the City and Suburbs’ seems to have a good bit on it though – hope to get hold of it soon.

The Crumlin housing as it exists today itself reads as an open book, reflecting cultural and societal trends to an extraordinary degree – most prominent of all of course being individualism.
Indeed it is the result of this very practice that forces you to look down from above to see the Crumlin Scheme as originally built. This is an OS map of the area – you can see how beautifully planned it is:

Image

…all linking through to Crumlin village at the very bottom.

(apologies for the poor quality of the pics below - very rushed)

Mostly designed and built in the 1930s, the basic house unit is quite modernist in style: streamlined, clean cut lines, stripped of virtually any decoration, with the aesthetic relying on the bold structure of the buildings, the paint colour used, and the simplest of render detail in the form of a distinctive band running across the middle of every house, and around doors and windows. They have an almost classical elegance, particularly the doorcases:

Image


For the most part the units are not built as semi-detached as above – these were only used as infill or on corners – but rather as part of terraces such as these:

Image

Image


There were three main house types: the Mk 1, the Mk 2 and Mk 3 – the first being a two-bed mid-terrace, the second a three-bed mid-terrace, and the third being an end-of-terrace which is usually 3-bed. Most of the houses are built of solid concrete (not sure if this is cast concrete or cavity block though), making them incredibly solid, seemingly well insulated, and completely sound-proofed from neighbours. The interiors feature quality carpentry in doors, architraving, skirting and stairs.

As most people in Dublin know, it is the latter corner house that is highly coveted :), either in the form of an end-of-terrace or a signature corner house at a crossroads of which there are many beautifully laid out examples.
Corner houses were often given ‘special treatment’ like the Wide Streets Commission corners of old, with classic wine-bricked ground floors:

Image

…or just featuring a posher string course of brick rather than render :)

Image

Image

It is without doubt these carefully laid out crossroads punctuating linear streets that is one of the most appealing aspects of Crumlin housing. Which is where the rant begins :mad:

Why why why must we allow anything that is good in this country fall to pieces for the sake of individualism and parish pump politics?
Why in the name of all that is sane was the Crumlin Corporation housing scheme not protected from the inevitable utter insanity that prevails today?
Why is it that in Britain local authorities protect and enforce letting contracts in even the most depressingly bog standard, sprawling 1950s estates, yet in Dublin the Corporation couldn’t have given a toss as to how its flagship scheme built with such pride and optimism ended up?
Why when it started selling off its stock c.1970s did it not do so under strict lease conditions, indeed any conditions at all?!

It is so depressing to walk around these once fine areas and see the most arrogant, self-absorbed, selfish, self-centred preposterous alterations being carried out to units in this planned scheme, with not so much as the slightest input of any planning professional.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby GrahamH » Sat Nov 26, 2005 9:16 pm

One of the worst manifestations of this is the destruction of the distinctive boundary walls – arguably the finest feature of Corporation housing, and a design that remains completely unchanged for every single type of house ever built in the area from 1930 through until 1950 – they link everything together. Beautifully proportioned, built and finished, these walls are fine pieces of design, with the original gates featuring a little flourish of detail in what is an otherwise straight-laced urban scheme:

Image

Image


Everywhere you go you see the walls hacked down and left vacant, gateposts knocked out to fit cars into the drive – if you’re lucky they may be crudely rebuilt - breeze block walls, unrendered walls, rail-topped walls, ghastly all-singing red or tan brick replacement walls, piers and gateposts, 70s railings, 80s railings, gold-tipped 90s railings………

Image

Image

Image


When you see all this nonsense, and it’s everywhere, the planning threshold of around 1.5 metres or so to the front of properties comes across as nothing short of a farce.


Similarly, and much more prominently, how can any local authority possibly claim to be ‘protecting’ or ‘preserving’ the ‘established character’ of residential areas with extension applications, when you see the travesties of Corporation housing – the vast majority of which was not carried out in the dark ages of the 1970s as is commonly perceived, but rather today. How can Dublin City Council possibly permit this type of development?

A crucial corner house:

Image

A rendered-over mid-terrace:

Image

The ubiquitous porch addition:

Image

…and countless countless other additions on every second house.
Another astonishingly bad example of atrocious planning is the building of new houses as infill in the gardens of corner houses. Not only can this destroy the orderly planned crossroads, these houses aren’t even built in the same style! Red or orange brick and everything in between is permitted, materials completely alien to their location, cladding detached houses with equally inappropriate roofs chimneys and boundary wall treatment


Why was all of this allowed? Is personal ‘freedom’ and ‘expression’ considered so much more important than the greater good? Do really hold mé-féinism so dear to our hearts?!

Even if the houses of the 1930s don’t quite suit contemporary needs, a series of templates could have been drawn up by the City Council for the purposes of extending the original dwellings: plans that could not be deviated from that would have complemented the collective whole.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby GrahamH » Sat Nov 26, 2005 9:18 pm

Crumlin as it exists today is a shambles, with, as happens in all similar schemes, the only fragments of the original plan remaining manifest in decrepit houses occupied by elderly people who have lived there since day one: the Marian blue paint still on the front door since 1973, the garden overcome with weeds, and the original timber windows rotting off the sills.
Indeed original windows, let alone front doors are as rare as hen’s teeth now, with probably less than 1% of houses, i.e. less than 1 in 100 houses retaining their features, having survived the self-improvement brigade.


None of this intended to come across as some sort of Marxist rant, far from it, just if you have a plan, you stick to it. If it needs to be changed, you do it in an orderly fashion.
The above is also not intended as a scoff at the taste or cultivation of people, but rather their blindness towards the bigger picture.
It’s not the preposterousness of the cliché below that is offensive, rather it is the damage done to common interest:

Image

Image

Image

(Though saying that, you gotta love that last house – it has what seem to be blue LEDs built into the interior sill of the bay window that light up the curtains at night :D)


It seems the ‘common interest’ in this country is having the freedom to do as you like, considering this is what most people seem to want…
Similarly you could argue that part of the appeal of Crumlin today is this very patchwork makeup of the area.

How different things could have been.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby Devin » Sat Nov 26, 2005 10:18 pm

Ah yes, Crumlin - it has the holy grail of planning today: the ‘series of interconnecting streets and spaces’. A detail I love is the Art Deco-ish motif on the dwarf wall surrounding the circular green in the centre.

It is so sad what is happening to those houses and their curtilage. A friend of mine lives in one – the insides are of similarly good robust design.

Something definitely needs to be done before the place becomes unrecognisable.
Devin
Old Master
 
Posts: 1509
Joined: Fri Dec 12, 2003 10:27 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby lunasa » Sun Nov 27, 2005 1:07 am

Graham honey, there's no accounting for taste. Some people like easi-cheese with their fois gras.
lunasa
Member
 
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2005 6:09 pm
Location: Milano

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby dc3 » Sun Nov 27, 2005 11:23 am

I seem to recall reading a microfilm news report from the period that the primary school in Crumlin was the largest in Europe due to the sudden influx of new residents.

One wonders if locating the Children's Hospital there too was an early (rare) example of planning.

The influence of Marino on Crumlin is very pronounced. Pity the planners of both areas did not foresee the explosion in car ownership, a the narrow roads are in part the explanation of the early transformation of gardens into car parking bays. This is one of the most pronounced, yet unremarked, features of changing urban landscape.
dc3
Member
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2000 1:00 am
Location: dublin, ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby GrahamH » Mon Nov 28, 2005 8:07 pm

Absolutely - though the opposite is often the case regarding road widths dc3: Crumlin has exceptionally wide streets in places, made up of wide pavements, an equally wide and often windswept lay-by, and then wide two-lane carriageways in the middle. Even in these cases no effort is made to convert these areas for parking.
I know from residents that these areas are used by commerical outfits and small business to park their trucks and trailers at night! Indeed the place can become a dumping ground at weekends for commercial vehicles.

Also many of these areas are devoid of planting, i.e. trees along what could be fine very avenues and roads. No doubt this is in part due to the troublesome generation of the past, but efforts should now be made to change this. One need only look at the beauty of St Agnes Park, the main avenue that links the Crumlin Scheme to the village and church.
It is a private road, but was developed at roughly the same time in the late 40s and early 50s. At the time it was planted with sycamore trees and now these form an almost Griffith Avenue-like streetscape - if only the same could be said for the Crumlin scheme.

As the Hospital has been mentioned the new wing recently opened looks great, fits in very well with the original scheme, even if its long-term future may be in question:

Image

Yes that fact about the schools in Crumlin is extraordinary - something like 20,000 children used to pour out of the schools at closing resulting in the closing times being staggered like present-day nightclubs :)
Indeed three of the schools are on St Agnes Park/Armagh Road, architecturally interesting in themselves - one modernist, the other two neoclassical.


When you see the gently curving roads of Crumlin, the squares and crescents, the well-designed houses and curtilages, the spaces set aside for recreation, the tree planting in areas where it has survived, the emphasis placed on layout and social interaction, you really would wonder about modern-day housing estates.
Why can't developers even lay out a curved street?! Is it really that difficult?! They can be so picturesque and visually interesting.
Why can't developers build terraces anymore, or indeed anything other than semi-ds on a grid pattern?
Or properly finish off estate walls, paving, planting, street furniture...?

The other factor to consider with Crumlin is that it was built at such a density as to make public transport more than viable; there's a bus every 15 minutes at peak times in most places, with every 20-30 minutes thereafter.
Very few, if any housing estate in modern Ireland can claim anything even close to the success of the Crumlin Scheme, planned over 70 years ago.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby Morlan » Mon Nov 28, 2005 8:36 pm

Good work, Graham. Image. 'Tis like reading a book.. when are you publishing that book on Dublin anyway?

One thing that strikes me about Crumlin/Drimnagh.. concrete & tarmac city. Not a planned tree in sight. The Long Mile Rd there is terribly sparse. A few trees down the median would work wonders.

Those houses in your first post were built to a very high standard. My sister has a similar house out in Inchicore, which is exactly the same as the ones in Crumlin. She had the house renovated, everything stripped back. It was amazing to see the craftsmanship underneath the plaster. Quality stuff indeed.

That building above (or the one next to it on the left) has something to do with Macdonalds fast food, they provided funding for it. I believe they serve food to the visitors of the hospital in that building. Sorry for being vague. I remember driving past it last week and seeing (much to my surprise) 'Ronald Macdonald House' on the side of the building!

Somebody here must know more about it.
User avatar
Morlan
Senior Member
 
Posts: 831
Joined: Thu Oct 09, 2003 2:47 pm
Location: Áth Cliath

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby GrahamH » Mon Nov 28, 2005 8:49 pm

Well they do operate a children's charity, a big world-wide organisation, so maybe it was part-funded by it?

Yes it's funny to see good old Corpo housing in parts of the city that may be unfamilar to you - they breed like rabbits, popping up all over the place :)
The basic model was used all over the city - even Fair City took them into account when building their set in the 80s!

Concrete & tarmac city is right - ridiculous amounts of space left bare and windswept. Indeed as we speak, much of this concrete is being renewed all over Crumlin causing something of a headache for residents trying to get home.
Hopefully trees will feature more this time round.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby dc3 » Mon Nov 28, 2005 10:16 pm

Yes

Well done Graham.

My understanding is that Ronald McDonald houses provide living quarters for parents of sick children, so they can stay with them in hospital.
dc3
Member
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Sun Dec 17, 2000 1:00 am
Location: dublin, ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby hutton » Tue Nov 29, 2005 1:49 pm

Graham, Excellent work, terrific rant :) But must disagree totally!
To my mind one of the most appealing aspects of these houses is that the basic robust structure of the units allows them to be individualised - a bit like Le Corbs Donimo. And if and when so desired in future times, the original can be reinstated without too much effort. I say this giving particular consideration to add-on conservatries that may up the floor area of a two-bed from maybe 70 sq metres (?) to closer to 100 - and so dramatically enhance the quality of life of a young couple with two kids. Any takers? I know that this heresy is probably going to be a minority view of 2! :D
PS When is the book coming out - and will you take contributions to its content from archiseek members?
hutton
Senior Member
 
Posts: 993
Joined: Tue Dec 28, 2004 10:14 pm
Location: NAMA HQ

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby StephenC » Tue Nov 29, 2005 2:25 pm

I live in a similar scheme in Donnycarney...although it was built a little earlier than Crumlin. But there are similar issues here. Extensions into side plots, building whole houses on some corner plots, re-rendering of facades out of style with the restof the scheme, hacienda style additions.

We also had no trees for years until some where put in about 10 years ago. However it was more a case of put a tree where there's an excess of pavement rather than laying out any sort of planting scheme.

Paving and surfaces are in a poor state generally. Personally I dont understand this fixation with using poured concrete for surfaces. Its only laid and it dug up by a utility. The cumulative affect in our scheme is a patchwork of low quality pavements and roads. The use of a high wuality tarmac set off with proper stone kerbs would be much more practical. Or eve the combination of tarmac and paving slabs that you see in UK housing schemes. At least the tarmac can be more easily removed and replaced when utility works are required.

And finally the mass of overhead wires and poor grade lighting takes away from the schemes. You rightly point out the aesthetic qualities of these housing schemes Graham...its such a pity that the public domain wasn't given as much consideration. Of course if this was Sandymount, Ballsbridge, Foxrock....
User avatar
StephenC
Old Master
 
Posts: 2483
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2001 12:00 am
Location: Dublin

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby Richards » Tue Nov 29, 2005 4:55 pm

Good article Graham!!
As a resident of Crumlin I would agree totally on your thesis.
The houses when originally built were very basic often with very basic sanitary facilities. the norm was to have a separate toilet in the back garden. The majority of the original houses had a very small kitchen area (back) with a small parlor room at the front. This space is small compared to today's standard new house design. I would guess that 95% of all housing stock in this area has some kind of back garden extension in order to compensate for the lack of space.(look at the OSI 1:1000 map). In my case, there is an single story flat roofed extension in the back garden which is where the kitchen is located. Kitchen extensions would make up the majority of extensions in the area. Having said that, it is great to live in an area with a very settled population. These is a sense of neighborhood which I feel if often missing in new housing developments.There is a great mix of people from young couples to OAP;s in the area. This kind of mix of people you do not get in any of the new housing developments in the new suburbs. The area is generally very safe where neighbors would generally look out for one another.

One of the biggest problems with new housing schemes on the peripheries of out towns and cities is this 'Cul-de-sac' culture. Nearly every new housing scheme has one entrance in and out only. When looking on a map each housing estate is linked by these distributor roads which are dreary featureless places often with a footpath and gray block walls. These do not add to the concept of an urban place. While I understand that most people who buy (or rent) houses with children want cul-de-sac's because of traffic issues (so that they will let there children play out side etc). But these new cul-de-sac developments are usually not sustainable, lead to this car dependant culture and this monotony of house design which is so prevalent in Irish towns and cities today. I think new developments should have a sense of propose, streets which go places, terraced housing, footpaths and places where you will find pedestrians. One of the interesting things looking at the population density maps (based on DED's) from the last census is that Crumlin and Drimnagh have some of the highest population densities in the city. Yet all houses in these areas have some kind of small private open space
Richards
Member
 
Posts: 64
Joined: Thu May 27, 2004 9:35 am

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby anto » Tue Nov 29, 2005 8:50 pm

anybody see the dreadful estates on Prime Time Investigates last night. One can't but winder that this terribly bleak estates had something to do with the Anti social behaviour (That and the parents and lack of law enforcement!)
anto
Member
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Mon Aug 19, 2002 12:58 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby asdasd » Tue Nov 29, 2005 11:29 pm

anybody see the dreadful estates on Prime Time Investigates last night. One can't but winder that this terribly bleak estates had something to do with the Anti social behaviour (That and the parents and lack of law enforcement!)


Yes, but Graham is in favour of the bleakness. Did you not read the thread properly?
asdasd
Member
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2003 4:59 am

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby GrahamH » Wed Nov 30, 2005 2:54 am

Absolutely - there's nothing like a well-placed burnt out car, stripped-back pebble-dashed (also preferably scorched) facades, and all round a sense of hopelessness and despair. Conforms to what's been said above to a tee.

There is nothing bleak asdasd in uniformity, though this does seem to be the Irish mindset. There is nothing bleak in the order proposed above - quite the opposite in fact, in contrast with modern-day estates which are very much so cheerless places. Corporation schemes like Crumlin have a life of their own by virtue of the variety of house designs, street patterns and layouts, and the multitude of colours used. Coupled with imaginative street planting and the individuality of resident's gardens, they make for thoroughly attractive places to live

I'm not suggesting that this is what you think asdasd, but your use of the term 'bleak' perfectly encapsulates for me Irish people's attitude towards domestic architecture and 'communal' living. Everything is 'bleak' and 'boring' unless I get the the chance to tart my place up, and make it stand out from the crowd. Uniformity, order and coherence are not considered worthy concepts in this country any more; people are no longer content to live with a base unit to which they can merely add some of their own touches in the form of differently coloured front doors or windows. They have to make a 'statement' - smash out the front of the house and stick in a bay window, tack on a porch, change the windows to highlight my tastes, install a length of new facia the pathetic width of my plot to demarcate my patch from the plebs, install regal railings to the front, paint my house in what is an otherwise unpainted terrace.......the list goes on and on.

So few people seem to have an appreciation for the understated, the simple, for quiet elegance. Instead of being content with quietly being part of the crowd, people want to detach themselves from it at all costs. Of course this has always been the case down through time, but it's never been as blatently evident nor as destructive in the built environment as today.

Richards wrote: These is a sense of neighborhood which I feel if often missing in new housing developments.There is a great mix of people from young couples to OAP]

Could not agree more Richards, this is perhaps the best aspect of Crumlin today. There's such a mix of people there now that works so well, especially having the older generation around which is wonderful - such a refreshing contrast to the stilted demographic of newly established housing estates. There can be a real sense of community in places, with younger people looking after the older ones, and they in turn enjoying having kids around again etc.

Also Crumlin housing is prefect for modern needs with the mixture of two and three-bed houses. With the household population topping 1.4 million recently, a whopping proportion of this increase is amongst single and dual-occupier households, to whom the two-beds perfectly suit. The diversity in house size here further helps to enliven the area and attract different people.
Agreed about the room sizes, the sitting room in particular to the front is really tiny in the two-beds. But yes there is huge scope to the rear of these properties to extend, which is where all such extensions should've been confined instead of destroying the distinctive streetscapes with willy nilly, and by and large remarkably ugly, additions.

hutton wrote: And if and when so desired in future times, the original can be reinstated without too much effort


So when exactly is this Revolution planned for hutton? Please give us a hint so we can cash in before the Morehampton Roads of the city vacate in favour of Drimnagh. I can see the estate agents' blurb on original features already :p
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby asdasd » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:06 am

Graham. I dont take offence at you assuming that I am opposed to grey bleak unifrom council houses. I think there should be restrictions on what can be built but lets leave people ownership of their housing stock. You do sound like a Marxist, or a paternalistic conservative: not sure which.

install a length of new facia the pathetic width of my plot to demarcate my patch from the plebs


(My boldification.)

I see.
asdasd
Member
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2003 4:59 am

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby GrahamH » Wed Nov 30, 2005 3:52 am

Pathetic in the grand scheme of a terrace - there is nothing more ridiculous, more ludicrous than a length of personalised fascia on one unit in a terrace. More than anything, this is what sums up people's self-absorption when it comes to the built environment.

I dont take offence at you assuming that I am opposed to grey bleak unifrom council houses.


In which case I presume you are not opposed to Crumlin, considering its houses are for the most part neither grey nor bleak.
There is a world of difference between Crumlin and the likes of architecturally dismal Muirhevna Mór in Dundalk.

By no means is uniformity desirable across the board in the built environment - variety is the spice of life, and this is what makes our streetscapes and buildings interesting. What irritates me about Crumlin is that like countless other schemes and developments, it was just allowed to fall apart because nobody could be bothered to keep it together.
GrahamH
Old Master
 
Posts: 4580
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2002 11:24 am
Location: Ireland

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby asdasd » Wed Nov 30, 2005 4:01 am

Yeah I admit I dont know much about crumlin at all. I am thinking of certain northside housing estates.
asdasd
Member
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2003 4:59 am

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby Rory W » Thu Dec 01, 2005 6:08 pm

Don't worry - all the houses in Crumlin are soon to have a unified scheme, all extensions re-renderings etc will be disguised under wave after wave of Christmas Lights - you wont be able to see any modern additions! :)
Rory W
Old Master
 
Posts: 1331
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2000 12:00 am
Location: Drogheda & Blackrock

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby Alek Smart » Fri Dec 02, 2005 4:58 pm

Holy God Graham but given the present social climate I would hope you keep your camera well concealed during your perambulations through Crumlin/Drimnagh.....:eek:
Its something to keep in the back of your mind,that the sight of a strange fellow taking pictures of individual houses and cars in a resedential area might not be seen as having anything to do with a Social/Architectural forum in some people`s minds.......Bi Cuaramach A Cairde :)
Alek Smart
Member
 
Posts: 285
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2003 11:34 pm
Location: Tallaght

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby PTB » Sat Dec 03, 2005 12:27 am

I think that the most lamentable thing here is that these great works of planning is that they aren't done anymore. If you look at the map above you see that the area is well laid out in a web of roads which create some sense of there being a neighbourhood. One road leads to another and traffic is assimilated better. Nowadays though all you have are cul-de-sacs with 200 homes on them which all lead on to the same road. There could be 5 or 6 estates leading onto what was a country road 5 years ago, which leads to the same set of traffic lights.Theres no sense of area, just anonomous estates with roads that go from the exit/enterance to the end and back again. The large housing estates built by the government in cities around the country in the fifties and sixties were well designed in terms of layout though socially they were a disaster. Sometimes I wish that the government would make up the plans for new neighbourhoods themselves, with better integrated road networks, and then let the developers do the rest. But thats not going to happen.

On the subject of the careless alterations of houses such as these, have you seen some of the colours on houses
in knocknaheeny in Cork? Luminous orange ground to gutter. Yuk!
PTB
Member
 
Posts: 451
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2005 12:14 am
Location: Middle Earth

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby asdasd » Sat Dec 03, 2005 3:46 am

PTB wrote:On the subject of the careless alterations of houses such as these, have you seen some of the colours on houses
in knocknaheeny in Cork? Luminous orange ground to gutter. Yuk!


Maybe you should call in and complain?
asdasd
Member
 
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Jul 13, 2003 4:59 am

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby djasmith » Wed Sep 05, 2007 4:18 pm

Yes original windows and doors are a missing feature now around crumlin. Ive often been temped to call into an 'original' house when its just been sold on and ask for all the windows and doors if the house was being gutted, which more often than not it is. but ive never done it.

Speaking of walls they are an amazing asset to the estates. Not sure if anyone noticed over the past few months, but a house on the corner of Sundrive Road and Clogher Road had its curved original front wall damaged very badly in a traffic accident. The owners have done a most amazing job on restoring the wall to almost original condition and it really does look fantastic. Although one would know on looking at it that the quality just isn't the same. In Crumlin all those lines are perfectly straight and level in the walls, the border where the bit of dashing crosses onto render is perfectly straight, and the curves leading up to the pillars are all perfectly formed. In this day and age with all our technology 70 years later, out builders just cannot seem to get this right. and It shows. none the less it's a pretty good job. ill try and get a photo.

dAve.
djasmith
Member
 
Posts: 84
Joined: Sun Sep 02, 2007 7:24 pm

Re: The Great 1930s Scheme

Postby Rory W » Wed Sep 05, 2007 5:16 pm

djasmith wrote:Yes original windows and doors are a missing feature now around crumlin. Ive often been temped to call into an 'original' house when its just been sold on and ask for all the windows and doors if the house was being gutted, which more often than not it is. but ive never done it.

Speaking of walls they are an amazing asset to the estates. Not sure if anyone noticed over the past few months, but a house on the corner of Sundrive Road and Clogher Road had its curved original front wall damaged very badly in a traffic accident. The owners have done a most amazing job on restoring the wall to almost original condition and it really does look fantastic. Although one would know on looking at it that the quality just isn't the same. In Crumlin all those lines are perfectly straight and level in the walls, the border where the bit of dashing crosses onto render is perfectly straight, and the curves leading up to the pillars are all perfectly formed. In this day and age with all our technology 70 years later, out builders just cannot seem to get this right. and It shows. none the less it's a pretty good job. ill try and get a photo.

dAve.



Back then people took pride in their work - builders today are not the apprenticed craftsmen of old, rather they are the jack of all/master of none variety
Rory W
Old Master
 
Posts: 1331
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2000 12:00 am
Location: Drogheda & Blackrock

Next

Return to Ireland