Dublin skyline

Re: Dublin skyline

Postby rob mc » Tue Dec 05, 2006 8:23 pm

paul h wrote:thanks rob mc, but i was wondering if work has actually started on them??


I'm not architect but i cant find anything offensive with that buiding in the pictures:confused:


dont think so no but everything is ready for them to start.just a matter of time,probably early next year
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Re: Dublin skyline

Postby Morlan » Mon Mar 19, 2007 8:17 am

I'm more looking forward to the revamped bridge to be honest
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Re: Dublin skyline

Postby jackwade » Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:55 am

Does this count as false advertising?

http://www.daft.ie/2680909

That's Morlan's photoshopped picture, first posted on page 11 of this thread.
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Re: Dublin skyline

Postby igy » Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:41 am

jackwade wrote:Does this count as false advertising?

http://www.daft.ie/2680909

That's Morlan's photoshopped picture, first posted on page 11 of this thread.

ha, that's nice of them :-)

At least they left his watermark on it
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Re: Dublin skyline

Postby Paul Clerkin » Sun Mar 22, 2009 3:53 pm

unlike mine which they just nicked
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Re: Dublin skyline

Postby Morlan » Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:35 pm

jackwade wrote:Does this count as false advertising?

http://www.daft.ie/2680909

That's Morlan's photoshopped picture, first posted on page 11 of this thread.


Thanks for the heads up. Just doing up an invoice now.
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Re: Dublin skyline

Postby Pepsi » Fri Mar 27, 2009 4:14 pm

i saw a clip on the news the other day about clongriffin, dublin. i was amazed to see a rather nice plush looking highrise here so i checked out their wesite http://www.clongriffin.ie to see what it's all about. the larger image on the right hand side of the page shows what i saw on the news but it also shows further highrise buildings. are the "red" buildings under constuction at present? does anyone know? looks good.
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby Contraband » Thu Apr 09, 2009 3:24 pm

57 metres?
The Riverpoint Tower and the Clarion Hotel Tower in Limerick City are both taller than that! How is it that in the nation's capital in one of the most expensive areas the only buildings that can be built fall behind buildings already built in Limerick?
I know tallness isn't everything, but seriously at least one decent actual skyscraper would be nice.
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Fri Apr 10, 2009 1:53 am

I must warn you that you're just asking for a barrage of idiotic arguments against high rise: from the (false) claim that they would be out of place in what is essentially a low rise city, to the (equally false) argument that high rise buildings will not increase density in Dublin, as if that were even the point.

I totally agree that Dublin needs some high rise buildings. Such buildings are a crucial way for a capital city to express its openness to thinking big and remaining dynamic into the future. From a purely architectural perspective, skyscrapers create contrasts and shadows and sculptural effects undreamed of by those who are limited to a view of vast planes of five storey retail park fodder. I mean, was Georgian Dublin constructed at the same height, block after block? No. Variation was key to its success. The modern equivalent is a more substantial varying of heights - and nothing could be more contextual to Dublin than that. Anybody who surveyed Ireland's account books for the last twenty years and then went to look at the docklands would be drawn to the inevitable conclusion that some kind of pathology is in effect here - a simple primeval fear preventing Dublin from getting it up like normal cities.
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby Smithfield Resi » Fri Apr 10, 2009 7:51 pm

barrage of idiotic arguments against high rise: from the (false) claim that they would be out of place in what is essentially a low rise city, to the (equally false) argument that high rise buildings will not increase density in Dublin, as if that were even the point.


Nice starting point for reasonable debate...calling holders of the opposite view idiotic.

I could equally express it as....

barrage of idiotic arguments for high rise: from the (false) claim that they would make Dublin a 'modern city', to the (equally false) argument that high rise buildings will increase density in Dublin, as if that were even the point.

"crucial way for a capital city to express its openness to thinking big and remaining dynamic into the future"

How exactly is a low/medium rise city less open-minded?

From a purely architectural perspective, skyscrapers create contrasts and shadows and sculptural effects undreamed of by those who are limited to a view of vast planes of five storey retail park fodder.

Are you saying that architects cannot express contrast and sculptural effects in less than 15 storeys? Really?
http://thomasmayerarchive.de/details.php?image_id=86095&l=english

I mean, was Georgian Dublin constructed at the same height, block after block? No. Variation was key to its success.

Equally, the uniformity of the rooflines of the grand Georgian terraces is part of their beauty, Without the need to 'punctuate' the skyline (god, I loathe that word)

The modern equivalent is a more substantial varying of heights - and nothing could be more contextual to Dublin than that.

Define substantial. That seems to be the crux of the debate....

Anybody who surveyed Ireland's account books for the last twenty years and then went to look at the docklands would be drawn to the inevitable conclusion that some kind of pathology is in effect here - a simple primeval fear preventing Dublin from getting it up like normal cities.

Since you bring up the inevitable phallic allusion, is the frustration at the lack of high-rise expressed by the 'we want it big and tall and now!' brigade a primeaval fear of impotence? :D
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby thebig C » Fri Apr 10, 2009 7:56 pm

Contraband wrote:57 metres?
The Riverpoint Tower and the Clarion Hotel Tower in Limerick City are both taller than that! How is it that in the nation's capital in one of the most expensive areas the only buildings that can be built fall behind buildings already built in Limerick?
I know tallness isn't everything, but seriously at least one decent actual skyscraper would be nice.


I thought that was strange also. I recall seeing a recent acticle listing the height as approx62 metres. I.E, 14x4 metre office floors plus a 6 metre ground floor lobby.

Maybe the planners gave it a crew cut on the basis that nothing should stand taller then Liberty Hall. I am being facecious I know....but that mindset does exist!

C
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby rob mc » Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:03 pm

thebig C wrote:I thought that was strange also. I recall seeing a recent acticle listing the height as approx62 metres. I.E, 14x4 metre office floors plus a 6 metre ground floor lobby.

Maybe the planners gave it a crew cut on the basis that nothing should stand taller then Liberty Hall. I am being facecious I know....but that mindset does exist!

C


Would 5 metres really make much of a difference?

Maybe they can stick a piece of metal to the top of it,like they seem to do with most medium rise building in this country to make seem bit bigger :D
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby rob mc » Fri Apr 10, 2009 8:08 pm

Contraband wrote:57 metres?
The Riverpoint Tower and the Clarion Hotel Tower in Limerick City are both taller than that! How is it that in the nation's capital in one of the most expensive areas the only buildings that can be built fall behind buildings already built in Limerick?
I know tallness isn't everything, but seriously at least one decent actual skyscraper would be nice.


You cant just build one massive skyscraper in the middle of low/medium rise buildings, unless you want it to end up like Manchester,which looks completely ridiculous!

Image

Image
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby Contraband » Fri Apr 10, 2009 10:07 pm

At least they have something.
I know, I know, I know - height isn't everything. Like it or not though, it is a symbol of a modern city, of progress, and of success. I recognize that in the midst of one of the deepest recessions Ireland's ever seen, building skyscrapers isn't really what the city should focus on.
However, what I will say, is that I really don't understand why the city constantly fought any high rise development during the boom years, and why getting a building, which is only 57 meters high, is seen as a triumph for the Dublin high-rise movement.
Maybe now high rise should get built, simply for the fact that it is the cheapest time to build. Prepare for the future?
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby rob mc » Sat Apr 11, 2009 4:21 pm

Contraband wrote:At least they have something.
I know, I know, I know - height isn't everything. Like it or not though, it is a symbol of a modern city, of progress, and of success. I recognize that in the midst of one of the deepest recessions Ireland's ever seen, building skyscrapers isn't really what the city should focus on.
However, what I will say, is that I really don't understand why the city constantly fought any high rise development during the boom years, and why getting a building, which is only 57 meters high, is seen as a triumph for the Dublin high-rise movement.
Maybe now high rise should get built, simply for the fact that it is the cheapest time to build. Prepare for the future?


Yea i know what you mean, and i whole heartedly agree that Dublin really needs to go higher. And its true that in todays world people believe that the higher your buildings the more rich and powerful you are.

But in relation to this development a 15 story building in an area where 6 stories is frowned upon and where people fear that buildings of this size may fall on them, this is a triumph, at last.:D
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby rumpelstiltskin » Sat Apr 11, 2009 5:10 pm

Smithfield Resi wrote:Nice starting point for reasonable debate...calling holders of the opposite view idiotic.

I could equally express it as....

barrage of idiotic arguments for high rise: from the (false) claim that they would make Dublin a 'modern city', to the (equally false) argument that high rise buildings will increase density in Dublin, as if that were even the point.


How exactly is a low/medium rise city less open-minded?


Are you saying that architects cannot express contrast and sculptural effects in less than 15 storeys? Really?
http://thomasmayerarchive.de/details.php?image_id=86095&l=english


Equally, the uniformity of the rooflines of the grand Georgian terraces is part of their beauty, Without the need to 'punctuate' the skyline (god, I loathe that word)


Define substantial. That seems to be the crux of the debate....


Since you bring up the inevitable phallic allusion, is the frustration at the lack of high-rise expressed by the 'we want it big and tall and now!' brigade a primeaval fear of impotence? :D


Ok, here goes:
1.Dublin is not a low/medium rise city, it is a low rise city. People are even afraid of medium rise. And it betokens an almost obsessive Victorian conservatism. I happen to think that medium/high rise makes up a good proportion of the modern architectural idiom, but apparently Dublin, with its grotty 1960s monstrosities and crumbling Georgians is above (or below) all that.
2. I didn't say you can't express contrasts in less than 15 storeys. But by limiting yourself to less than fifteen storeys you consequently limit the range of possible effects. I think a good modern city has a good mix of such effects, but Dublin is limiting itself to only one model.
3. Would you not call the Four Courts a punctuation? Or St. Stephen's church?
4. I don't think there's anything wrong with the "our buildings are bigger than your buildings" mentality. Competition is crucial to creativity. The fact is that most people in Ireland would like to have a gleaming capital city with great architecture and magnificent skyscrapers. It simply sends a message that anything others can do, we can do just as good. Yet we continue to treat Dublin as a provincial city, even as a town. It's a capital city and it needs monumental over-the-topness.
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby Contraband » Sun Apr 12, 2009 2:05 am

rumpelstiltskin wrote:The fact is that most people in Ireland would like to have a gleaming capital city with great architecture and magnificent skyscrapers. It simply sends a message that anything others can do, we can do just as good. Yet we continue to treat Dublin as a provincial city, even as a town. It's a capital city and it needs monumental over-the-topness.


So true, capital cities are often held up to the world as an example of the best a nation has to offer - in terms of culture, history, landmarks, education, and of course architecture.

High-rise simply sends a signal of 'we're a serious city, not an overgrown town.'
I'm all for keeping large parts of Dublin Georgian, but it's not as if we can keep the docklands Georgian, this area is the perfect place to display Ireland's 'Mini Manhattan' or 'Canary Warf.'
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby gunter » Sun Apr 12, 2009 1:40 pm

For a start, the 'Alto Vetro, Grand Canal Docks, Dublin' thread is not the right place to continue this discussion!

. . . . out on the street with hurley sticks is the right place to continue this discussion.
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Re: Alto Vetro, grand canal docks, dublin

Postby rob mc » Sun Apr 12, 2009 8:38 pm

gunter wrote:For a start, the 'Alto Vetro, Grand Canal Docks, Dublin' thread is not the right place to continue this discussion!

. . . . out on the street with hurley sticks is the right place to continue this discussion.


Damn straight lol, there's no school like old school:D:D
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Re: Dublin skyline

Postby Morlan » Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:08 pm

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2010/0728/1224275614559.html

July 28, 2010
Developers to face high-rise curbs as council agrees plan

City councillors last night agreed to ban the construction of buildings above 28m (92ft) – about half the height of Liberty Hall – unless a statutory plan called a Local Area Plan (Lap) was drafted for the area in question. Such a plan could take several years to develop.

This would block the construction of any further high-rise or even medium-rise buildings in areas previously earmarked by the council for tall buildings such as the Docklands, Heuston and Connolly stations and George’s Quay.

LOL! :p
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